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Sensationalist Headline Black Tic-Tac on Mars

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posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:37 PM
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Just thought I'd throw this in here, rather than my "interesting rocks" thread, since it doesn't really have to do with rocks. Anyway, here's a .gif made with some Curiosity Right Navcam images taken 13 seconds apart. Unfortunately, it appears that the Left Navcam apparently wasn't taking pictures at the time. I guess they don't do that all the time anymore. Anyway, it's like that bright spot that showed up on one of the images a few weeks back, except that it's black and kind of looks like one of those "tic-tac" deals that are so popular these days.



mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
edit on 10-7-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:40 PM
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that is interesting. Was this not a subject on here awhile back though, correct me if wrong, but still interesting.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: data5091
that is interesting. Was this not a subject on here awhile back though, correct me if wrong, but still interesting.

I don't know. Maybe. I only just saw the images this morning from the latest Sol (2461). But there may have been something similar. There are all kinds of "bugs" and things that show up in the images. This one was unusually noticeable.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:44 PM
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This could just be a visual artifact of the digital picture taking process that happens occasionally. It looks like just a few pixels in a straight line. It could have been a cosmic ray interacting with the imaging sensor.

Of course, it could also be a UFO.

I am just throwing out another possible explanation.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:49 PM
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originally posted by: BomSquad
This could just be a visual artifact of the digital picture taking process that happens occasionally. It looks like just a few pixels in a straight line. It could have been a cosmic ray interacting with the imaging sensor.

Of course, it could also be a UFO.

I am just throwing out another possible explanation.

Oh, very possible. That "cosmic ray" explanation is one that gets trotted out every once in a while, although I'm not sure how anybody would actually prove that. It seems big, and not like other "cosmic ray" flashes I've seen. It didn't seem to permanently damage the camera. It doesn't show up in any of the preceding or following images. So...? I thought it was interesting enough to start a thread on it that has a provocative headline.
edit on 10-7-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:53 PM
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I propose that 120,000 pitchfork-wielding UFO fans should buy a one-way ticket to Mars courtesy of Elon Musk or Virgin Galactic.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: ConfusedBrit

there you go!!!!!



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: data5091
a reply to: ConfusedBrit

there you go!!!!!


I don't have pitchfork.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: BomSquad
This could just be a visual artifact of the digital picture taking process that happens occasionally. It looks like just a few pixels in a straight line. It could have been a cosmic ray interacting with the imaging sensor.

Of course, it could also be a UFO.

I am just throwing out another possible explanation.


I wish they'd stop using consumer cameras for these things, I mean cameras that are prone to so many glitches used for things that are reliant on the best possible observational perspective.

I never saw one glitch in Avatar...



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

My headline would be " Black Tic Tac's invade Mars" But that's me


Anyways, who says it's black because it's a black and white picture?



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
a reply to: Blue Shift

My headline would be " Black Tic Tac's invade Mars" But that's me

Anyways, who says it's black because it's a black and white picture?

I suppose it could be red. That sometimes shows up as black in a monochrome image. It might also be white, but looks black because of the lighter background. So many questions.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: BomSquad
This could just be a visual artifact of the digital picture taking process that happens occasionally. It looks like just a few pixels in a straight line. It could have been a cosmic ray interacting with the imaging sensor.

Of course, it could also be a UFO.

I am just throwing out another possible explanation.


That's what it looks like to me, a digital artifact



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 04:32 PM
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originally posted by: ConfusedBrit

originally posted by: data5091
a reply to: ConfusedBrit

there you go!!!!!


I don't have pitchfork.


You can't take the pitchfork on the ship. They are issued upon arrival



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: JHumm

Haha... Welcome to Mars. Here is your pitchfork!



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 05:55 PM
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Interesting, Blue. Keep up the good work.

It's a shame this is probably just the results of radiation damage from a random cosmic ray strike.
edit on 10-7-2019 by Archivalist because: oh well, tic tac on mars is too good to be true



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 06:33 PM
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originally posted by: vlawde
That's what it looks like to me, a digital artifact

That's very possible. It was the size and configuration of it that caught my attention. I've run across glitches before, although they are usually a lot less well-defined, like this one I found a while back (can't recall exactly what Sol):



Black or white, they generally tend to have those fade-out streaks. It's too bad the Left Navcam didn't get an image of it. If it shows up anytime soon, that will tell one way or another.

I'm also kind of wondering... do you think it might be possible for the wind to erode a rock or chunk of sedimentary material to such a degree that it might be blown up into the sky that high? I always thought the wind was too weak to move much but small bits of rock and dust. But hey. I could be wrong.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 09:34 PM
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There is an excellent study of cosmic rays affecting CCD's/CMOS camera chips. Great examples as well. (Courtesy, Cloudy Nights)

Cosmic Ray Examples

Almost all are somewhat spherical, like a hot spot, but very few pixels involved. It would tend to provide more credence to longer, angular and thicker streaks as not being cosmic ray generated.
edit on 10-7-2019 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Jul, 11 2019 @ 01:44 AM
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Yeah, I thought this could have been a real find at first, but it's 100% certainly not a UFO or aliens or anything like that.

I ran the capture on 2461 by some actual experts on the matter.

100% cosmic ray. Not alien.
No, I am not a shill. No, I am not part of the conspiracy.



posted on Jul, 11 2019 @ 11:10 AM
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originally posted by: Archivalist
No, I am not a shill. No, I am not part of the conspiracy.

That's exactly what someone who is part of the conspiracy would say!



posted on Jul, 11 2019 @ 02:07 PM
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originally posted by: Archivalist
Yeah, I thought this could have been a real find at first, but it's 100% certainly not a UFO or aliens or anything like that.

I ran the capture on 2461 by some actual experts on the matter.

100% cosmic ray. Not alien.
No, I am not a shill. No, I am not part of the conspiracy.

Who are these "actual experts"?
You are a WUM.

It looks like a solid object, but who knows and who will ever know?
edit on 11-7-2019 by fromtheskydown because: Messed it up!



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