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Smallest known star discovered.

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posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 12:09 AM
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The smallest known star has been discovered and it weighs in at just 16% bigger then jupiter, and smaller then some planets known orbiting other stars.

space.com...

now prepare to argue over the jupiter star theory




posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 12:10 AM
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hehe I'm gonna love this projectlucifer here we come

its gonna get bright out there bring your suntan lotion..



posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 12:28 AM
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The star's diameter may be only 16% larger than Jupiter's but its mass is much larger.



posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 12:30 AM
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Cool I didn't think that there could be a star that small.

I don't think this gives anything to the Jupiter changing into a star theory.
Jupiter is 1/80th the mass it needs to turn into a star.
The tiny star is extremely dense. Its actually 50 times as dense as the sun.
The diameter of the star is small but its mass is immense.



posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 02:18 AM
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Good find. Like the article stated the mass of an object is different than the size of an object. If you took 95 Jupiters and squeezed them all together into one Jupiter, it's mass would increase by 95 times and you could possibly have a star the size of Jupiter. The star would be the same size as Jupiter but with 95 times the mass of Jupiter today. That is one dense star described in the article (50 times more dense than our sun). I just felt like clarifying the difference between size and mass before someone starts claiming Jupiter could be a star again.


I haven't heard of any project that would create 95 Jupiters and put them all together so I don't think we need to worry about a new star.



posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 03:03 AM
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"Imagine that you add 95 times its own mass to Jupiter and nevertheless end up with a star that is only slightly larger,"

Still not possible sry. Its just not big/heavy enough.



posted on Mar, 5 2005 @ 12:32 AM
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Originally posted by Civil44
"Imagine that you add 95 times its own mass to Jupiter and nevertheless end up with a star that is only slightly larger,"

Still not possible sry. Its just not big/heavy enough.


Well that is what they appear to be saying they have discovered. A star with about 95 or 96 times the mass of Jupiter and it is a star. I used to hear that Jupiter needed about 75 times its own mass to become a star but I believe I heard a higher number later.

How many more Jupiter masses do you think it takes for star formation? I'm not sure what the popular Astronomy theory is now for minimal mass for a star to form.




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