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A Microwave Hologram Radar System

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posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 10:24 AM
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ieeexplore.ieee.org...

does anyone have anymore info on this? it seems to behind a paywall.


cool patient on paired sats
edit on 7-7-2019 by penroc3 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 04:45 PM
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Seems totally possible. Directed signals (microwaves, especially) are quite sensitive to obstructions in the pathway of the signal through the air.

When the F-117 'stealth fighter' went into service in the 1980s, it did an exceptional job of absorbing/scattering radar signals and was virtually impossible to track, especially at lower altitudes where it would be masked from radar detection by mixing in with ground clutter.

But during testing it was discovered the jet was completely trackable using fairly cheap *existing* systems not intended for air surveillance: cell phone transmit/receive towers and repeaters and microwave comms links.

The doctrine for mission operations of the jet dictated it fly very low to maximize its electronic invisibility. But if the jet flew through an area where the cell towers were in use, brief interruptions in networked signals could be quickly plotted on a map to show speed and direction of the aircraft over the ground.



posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: TheTruthRocks

Like low frequency radar, that's only good enough to tell you that something is there. It won't allow you to target well enough to either direct aircraft onto the target, or fire weapons. Technology has evolved since then, on both sides.



posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

so for instance in the 117 under the skin is where the microwaves are absorbed and on top deflected, i've always wondered why if one were to crank the emitter power way way up the aircraft wouldn't light up in IR.

even with normal radar, the energy has to go somewhere, and over a heavily contested area there are going to be allot of radar beams



posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

IR is limited in range that it can be detected. Under optimal conditions IRST is only going to "see" a target within weapons range of just about any weapon that can be carried by a stealth aircraft. I've seen claims that an F-22 supercruising at the limits of its ability could be detected at 288 miles, but again, that is under absolutely optimal conditions. You also need to know where to start looking to find any target.
edit on 7/7/2019 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

i think with all the stand off weapons already around and the crazy ones on the horizon the F22 is safe at 288 at the very least

if always wondered if there might be like a high res active cooling to hide something from IR, probably easier to just blind sensors.




posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 09:31 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

There are ways to cool exhaust to a degree. It's not going to make it cold but it will reduce the temperature somewhat.



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