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El Salvador's President takes blame for migrant deaths in Rio Grande

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posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 09:25 AM
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On July 1st, 2019 President Nayid Bukele took responsibility for the conditions that created the migrant crisis to begin with.

New York Times


He took responsibility.

“People don’t flee their homes because they want to,” President Nayib Bukele said Sunday at a news conference in San Salvador, the capital of El Salvador. “They flee their homes because they feel they have to.”

“They fled El Salvador, they fled our country,” he declared. “It is our fault.”


We often treat these nations as if they were our charge, our unwanted children that we must reluctantly agree to take care of because of these conditions created by their leadership.

But what were fail to recognize is that these countries are run by adults and the US is not responsible for them and their policy decisions.

It's time we stopped absolving Central and South American nations of their responsibility, both to the international community, and especially to their own citizens.
edit on 3 7 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Good on them, maybe they'll stop hand sitting and get some things done.

As for my country, it's a shame so many are willing to use tragedy as a political football. I'm ashamed of the politicians that do, because depending on the context of discussion their tune will change. On the topic of domestic affairs, many of our population are in the have not category (which is true, and I'd like to see this change). On the topic of immigration, we are all in the category of haves and need to focus on this as a paramount topic.

The truth is, we cannot be generous until we get our own affairs in order. We already have given 4.4 billion dollars to El Salvador, and continue to give yearly. I'm even willing to note I believe we do owe it to them to help out for two reasons. The first being helping them actually helps us in our task to curb illegal immigration, the second being we had some questionable endeavors there in the past.

What bugs me the most is the same politicians who use this as a political football only do so in the manner to blame their position. Very rarely do I actually hear of any ideas for meaningful reform, just finger pointing. As one of my old bosses said, don't come to me with problems, come to me with solutions.



posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 11:30 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn

But what were fail to recognize is that these countries are run by adults and the US is not responsible for them and their policy decisions.




That sentiment should apply to every country, no?



posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn




But what were fail to recognize is that these countries are run by adults and the US is not responsible for them and their policy decisions.


Well, that's up for debate.


Many people know that the U.S. intervened in Latin American politics throughout the 20th century and that we supported dictatorships favorable to American business interests.
…….

How are we, as Americans, involved? The American government, one of the people, was intimately involved with El Salvador’s right wing government before and after the massacre. We provided them with weapons, money, and political support for a full 11 years after the massacre.

www.huffpost.com...



posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: Sookiechacha

Yup, we've had our sins. But we've since given the country 4.4 billion dollars, or 1/6th of their GDP.

While I'm against colonialism, imperialism, or forced projection of influence. Tomorrow we celebrate our rising to the occasion.

Just because you have had hardship in the past doesn't give you a pass to sit on your hands.



posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker




But we've since given the country 4.4 billion dollars, or 1/6th of their GDP.


Do you have a source for that figure. Does that figure represent aid to El Salvador or all of Central America?



posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: Sookiechacha


I would like information on USAID’s support to El Salvador through the years. The United States has provided over $4.4 billion in development assistance through USAID and its predecessor U.S. Government programs. You may find more information on the History of USAID in El Salvador section in this website.
USAID.gov



posted on Jul, 3 2019 @ 02:30 PM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
On July 1st, 2019 President Nayid Bukele took responsibility for the conditions that created the migrant crisis to begin with.

New York Times


He took responsibility.

“People don’t flee their homes because they want to,” President Nayib Bukele said Sunday at a news conference in San Salvador, the capital of El Salvador. “They flee their homes because they feel they have to.”

“They fled El Salvador, they fled our country,” he declared. “It is our fault.”


We often treat these nations as if they were our charge, our unwanted children that we must reluctantly agree to take care of because of these conditions created by their leadership.

But what were fail to recognize is that these countries are run by adults and the US is not responsible for them and their policy decisions.

It's time we stopped absolving Central and South American nations of their responsibility, both to the international community, and especially to their own citizens.


While that may be true possibly in the case of El Salvador...

You really shouldnt lump all Central and south American countries into your statement.

Sometimes it IS the USA's fault.

We put sanctions and trade embargos on nations that create hostile conditions.



posted on Jul, 4 2019 @ 10:35 AM
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I'll extend an olive branch here and agree with the left wing members in this thread.

You guys have brought up some good points that I have argued before.

This is a complex situation. I believe our War on Drugs is responsible for much of this. However, I do not believe taking an all-permissive approach (via libertarian reality fog) to drugs or immigration, but clearly, the current policy isn't working.

That said, there is PLENTY of responsibility to lay at the feat of these countries whose leadership is more concerned with their corrupt dealings than with the will or prosperity of their own people.

I don't have an answer to that. I don't think anyone here does. But I'm willing to bet the people of these countries DO, and at the very least, we should enable them to make those changes on their own.
edit on 4 7 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)




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