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Smartphones May Cause 'Horns' in the Skulls of Regular Users, Research Shows

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posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 10:09 AM
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Be honest.

How many people just felt the back of their head for a horn ?




posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 10:09 AM
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So does holding it in your hands playing Candy Crush all day cause you to grow horns? Or do you have to actually have it up to your head 12 hours a day? I don't know anyone who talks on the phone that much. I avoid all calls.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 10:28 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 10:28 AM
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dup post removed
edit on Fri Jun 28 2019 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 11:05 AM
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I think it may too late for Tim Curry,
m5.paperblog.com...
(wonder what tariff he is on)

But you know on a more serious note people growing horn's or horn like protrusions is nothing new and has happened many time's throughout history - usually the poor sod was burned at the stake or something but not always.

And there are many, many claim's of horned skull's found in the past, some of them were REAL horn's, of course most or all such remain's have conveniently been lost?.


So maybe mobile phone's can have this affect but like the first video they are probably more tumor in nature than actual horn's BUT?.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 11:11 AM
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Sign of devil.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: and14263
Sign of devil.


Or, just the result of the brain trying to escape.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

I read about 30-50 books a year for the past 30 years. I wonder why I dont have little horns



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: YouSir

originally posted by: gallop
God damn it, I spent thousands of dollars having these silicone horns surgically put in place, when all I needed to do was use the phone more.

But.. does this mean I'll get horns on my horns??




Ummm...how...ahhh...horney does one need to be...?

Horn dog...





YouSir


I certainly don't need more horns where the horns are not required. I remember the day people still had ear horns, for listening in to conversations of folks at gatherings and what not. Ol' Polly in her formal attire, her head tilted, as she listened intently to the jovial conversations..



It's just progression. It's the brain horns we'll have to be worried about...
I am looking at you farce bork and gurgle..


edit on 28-6-2019 by gallop because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: VictorVonDoom

Mine did that years ago.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: Artemis12

No


Why?



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: Fallingdown
Be honest.

How many people just felt the back of their head for a horn ?


I stopped feeling the back on my head that day I shaved it, and felt it, and felt what felt like a ducks bum.

O.o

Horns would be an improvement.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: Nexttimemaybe

You double posted, and didn't even edit the second one.

Who's not smart enough to use technology, again?

eta- haha but yeah, he did..




edit on 28-6-2019 by gallop because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 01:18 PM
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www.nature.com...
edit on 28-6-2019 by SeaWorthy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: sunkuong
a reply to: Artemis12

No. Your sorces arent science. Good fiction, though

It is science you can go download the citations if you need
Scientific Reportsvolume 8, Article number: 3354 (2018) | Download Citation



Abstract Recently we reported the development of prominent exostosis young adults’ skulls (41%; 10–31 mm) emanating from the external occipital protuberance (EOP). These findings contrast existing reports that large enthesophytes are not seen in young adults. Here we show that a combination sex, the degree of forward head protraction (FHP) and age predicted the presence of enlarged EOP (EEOP) (n = 1200, age 18–86).


While being a male and increased FHP had a positive effect on prominent exostosis, paradoxically, increase in age was linked to a decrease in enthesophyte size. Our latter findings provide a conundrum, as the frequency and severity of degenerative skeletal features in humans are associated typically with aging.
Our findings and the literature provide evidence that mechanical load plays a vital role in the development and maintenance of the enthesis (insertion) and draws a direct link between aberrant loading of the enthesis and related pathologies.
We hypothesize EEOP may be linked to sustained aberrant postures associated with the emergence and extensive use of hand-held contemporary technologies, such as smartphones and tablets. Our findings raise a concern about the future musculoskeletal health of the young adult population and reinforce the need for prevention intervention through posture improvement education.





Results Our current analysis demonstrated the prevalence of EEOP to be 33% of the total population. Logistic regression analysis indicated the presence of an EEOP to be significantly predicted (72.3%; P < 0.001) using the following variables: sex, the degree of forward head protraction (FHP), and age. Sex was the primary predictor with males being 5.48 times more likely to have EEOP than females (P < 0.001).

The extent of FHP (Fig. 2) was a significant component in the prediction of EEOP, where an increase in FHP resulted in a 1.03 times increased likelihood of having EEOP (P < 0.001). Our data also reveals that sex and age are significant factors with the mean FHP in the male population being 28 ± 15 mm while that for the female population was 24 ± 11 mm (P < 0.001). Additionally, FHP was significantly greater in the over 60 s age group than for any of the other age groups (P < 0.001), with FHP >40 mm observed frequently (34.5%) in the over 60 s population (AR = +2.4) (Fig. 3). Accordingly, increases in age groups of both sexes are correlated with a more pronounced FHP.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: jtrenthacker

No, Your Kid Isn't Growing Horns Because Of Cellphone Use


Have to keep the sheep calm don't we.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 03:40 PM
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Coincidence due to crappy posture was my interpretation.

Trying to blame cell phones for horn growth is today's version of the late 90's/early 00's fear mongering over cell phones giving you brain cancer. That one didn't exactly come to fruition, either.



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: jtrenthacker

No, Your Kid Isn't Growing Horns Because Of Cellphone Use

I am sure baseline techs on the web have a better understanding of the medical field than doctors



posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 03:56 PM
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I guess that may be a reason for me to finally get me one.
I will add that to the list for future reference.
In case I get around to making that decision one day.




posted on Jun, 28 2019 @ 07:28 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

This is BS. I'll tell you why. Nobody ever uses their cell phone to talk.




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