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China continues buying Iranian LPG despite U.S. sanctions

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posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 09:11 AM
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originally posted by: Waterglass
a reply to: dfnj2015

What ever happened to BRICS?


BRICS is the acronym coined for an association of five major emerging national economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa.


Brazil is cooked. South Africa is cooked. Iran could be on standby so this "war" could stop that.
BRICS lol




posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Sanitarium79
a reply to: Waterglass
Why should China, or any other country care about US sanctions?
Especially since they own a little of America's debt, eh?
AND? lol, the ignorancy of people when they bring that up....
"Ignorancy"...not a word that's used very often any more. Was that done out of irony...or ignorance?



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 09:42 AM
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We should work out the trade deal between the US and China so their businesses do not have to pay an import tax on the LPG. These Chinese businesses are locked into prices for their products under contracts, they need the supplies to stay at a steady price so the companies can stay viable. Another country that does not have a tax other than Iran should be stepping up, but remember that Iran can also sue these companies because they made a contract with them.

This is not an easy solution to work out. These Chinese businesses cannot sell their products at a loss for very long, they got what they needed to supply their service. The Chinese people using the LPG cannot afford a big increase either. The China trade deals need to be done quickly, that could be a problem.

It is hard for a country like China to start buying high priced American goods to counteract the deficit, they cannot sell the overpriced products in their country, they can make the stuff way cheaper and employ more people with the savings. The cost of living is so much different. What we need to do is to start making our own stuff again, China can still make some of the stuff, and they can actually raise their prices a little to compensate. This twenty five percent tarriff is nuts. Five percent would be all right, there are rams bucking horns in both of our countries, lack of cooperation is the problem. I see little solution to the problem, we need to start making our own, the poor Chinese people have to wear masks to go anywhere over there because of the concentrated polution.



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 09:44 AM
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originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Sanitarium79
a reply to: Waterglass
Why should China, or any other country care about US sanctions?
Especially since they own a little of America's debt, eh?


28% to be exact. China knows they have the US by the balls.

No one is batting a eye at the Trump admin because any moves he makes, congress, the country, will be in even more disarray.



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: Pluginn
It's not a law for other country's but if you ignore those sanctions the US pusnish that country.

Like with the EU recently who wanted to bypass the US sanctions got this warning:



"Entities that continue to engage in sanctionable activity involving Iran risk severe consequences that could include losing access to the US financial system and the ability to do business with the United States or US companies," he said.


Nice dictatorial behavior...
Well, when your the worlds reserve currency, you can have that kind of pull.

Iran has been sanctioned and people who do business with them will be subjected to penalties.

Look at Huwaei, they got caught doing business and now they are blacklisted, and this is a chinese company too, Trump Admimistration gives no F#s.


Yea the US is now more and more viewed as untrustworthy. When you have this world trading currency it comes with a responsibility's not using it for blackmailing, making country's/competition weaker.
But the US got a big spending problem, it needs to spend at least 1000 billion more then they have in income/year.
So they got an income of about 3400 billion and so they are spending about 4400 billion/year.

They know the US can't go on like this for a long time, so in the meantime making competition weaker, start some war(s) and such, in the meantime China gets closer with Russia and both trying to get bypass the dollar as much as possible.

The EU most likely will also be attacked economically as well sooner or later (which is also competition).. so it's a matter of time when the EU wakes up that it also find ways around the US.



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Sanitarium79
a reply to: Waterglass
Why should China, or any other country care about US sanctions?
Especially since they own a little of America's debt, eh?
AND? lol, the ignorancy of people when they bring that up....
"Ignorancy"...not a word that's used very often any more. Was that done out of irony...or ignorance?
"often anymore" once again, AND?

You can't weaponize Debt.

"Dumping treasuries would be an ineffective weapon for China as that would send yields higher and hurt the positions of their own holdings in treasuries,” said Tan." (Political et al)

So yes, "Ignorancy" at its finest.



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 10:05 AM
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originally posted by: Pluginn

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: Pluginn
It's not a law for other country's but if you ignore those sanctions the US pusnish that country.

Like with the EU recently who wanted to bypass the US sanctions got this warning:



"Entities that continue to engage in sanctionable activity involving Iran risk severe consequences that could include losing access to the US financial system and the ability to do business with the United States or US companies," he said.


Nice dictatorial behavior...
Well, when your the worlds reserve currency, you can have that kind of pull.

Iran has been sanctioned and people who do business with them will be subjected to penalties.

Look at Huwaei, they got caught doing business and now they are blacklisted, and this is a chinese company too, Trump Admimistration gives no F#s.


Yea the US is now more and more viewed as untrustworthy. When you have this world trading currency it comes with a responsibility's not using it for blackmailing, making country's/competition weaker.
But the US got a big spending problem, it needs to spend at least 1000 billion more then they have in income/year.
So they got an income of about 3400 billion and so they are spending about 4400 billion/year.

They know the US can't go on like this for a long time, so in the meantime making competition weaker, start some war(s) and such, in the meantime China gets closer with Russia and both trying to get bypass the dollar as much as possible.

The EU most likely will also be attacked economically as well sooner or later (which is also competition).. so it's a matter of time when the EU wakes up that it also find ways around the US.
This whole post amounts to "What ifs", too bad?

People often forget their positions when chatting about a country doing "what" as if the other country wouldn't do it.

This is a cold hard world and the US is the best shot there is for and open and free world. Our ideals is what makes up above all, even if we don't practice some of them in the darker corners, chalk it up to life.



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Sanitarium79
a reply to: Waterglass
Why should China, or any other country care about US sanctions?
Especially since they own a little of America's debt, eh?
AND? lol, the ignorancy of people when they bring that up....
"Ignorancy"...not a word that's used very often any more. Was that done out of irony...or ignorance?
"often anymore" once again...
Touché..."More coffee!", he cried.



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 10:12 AM
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originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Sanitarium79
a reply to: Waterglass
Why should China, or any other country care about US sanctions?
Especially since they own a little of America's debt, eh?
AND? lol, the ignorancy of people when they bring that up....
"Ignorancy"...not a word that's used very often any more. Was that done out of irony...or ignorance?
"often anymore" once again...
Touché..."More coffee!", he cried.
Covfefe!



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 10:37 AM
link   

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: Pluginn

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: Pluginn
It's not a law for other country's but if you ignore those sanctions the US pusnish that country.

Like with the EU recently who wanted to bypass the US sanctions got this warning:



"Entities that continue to engage in sanctionable activity involving Iran risk severe consequences that could include losing access to the US financial system and the ability to do business with the United States or US companies," he said.


Nice dictatorial behavior...
Well, when your the worlds reserve currency, you can have that kind of pull.

Iran has been sanctioned and people who do business with them will be subjected to penalties.

Look at Huwaei, they got caught doing business and now they are blacklisted, and this is a chinese company too, Trump Admimistration gives no F#s.


Yea the US is now more and more viewed as untrustworthy. When you have this world trading currency it comes with a responsibility's not using it for blackmailing, making country's/competition weaker.
But the US got a big spending problem, it needs to spend at least 1000 billion more then they have in income/year.
So they got an income of about 3400 billion and so they are spending about 4400 billion/year.

They know the US can't go on like this for a long time, so in the meantime making competition weaker, start some war(s) and such, in the meantime China gets closer with Russia and both trying to get bypass the dollar as much as possible.

The EU most likely will also be attacked economically as well sooner or later (which is also competition).. so it's a matter of time when the EU wakes up that it also find ways around the US.
This whole post amounts to "What ifs", too bad?

People often forget their positions when chatting about a country doing "what" as if the other country wouldn't do it.

This is a cold hard world and the US is the best shot there is for and open and free world. Our ideals is what makes up above all, even if we don't practice some of them in the darker corners, chalk it up to life.


The US was the best shot after ww2 sure, now it's only good for the US. The US needs conflicts so they can sell more weapons.
With open and free you don't sanction country's at will and tell other what they must do and if you don't listen you will be will be punished (even good befriended country's).
So now for example with Huawei. US company's do what the government tells them to do and block out competition where Huawei can't use android or MS windows anymore.
So now ppl in Europe can't buy Huawei phones anymore because of the US! yea open and free...
When EU country's still buy G5 equipment from Huawei they also have been warned of consequences.

That is a big warning for every company out there outside the US.. Also Europe because the US has shown it will just do that so everyone can be
edit on 21-6-2019 by Pluginn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 11:00 AM
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originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Arnie123

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: Sanitarium79
a reply to: Waterglass
Why should China, or any other country care about US sanctions?
Especially since they own a little of America's debt, eh?
AND? lol, the ignorancy of people when they bring that up....
"Ignorancy"...not a word that's used very often any more. Was that done out of irony...or ignorance?
"often anymore" once again, AND?

You can't weaponize Debt.

"Dumping treasuries would be an ineffective weapon for China as that would send yields higher and hurt the positions of their own holdings in treasuries,” said Tan." (Political et al)

So yes, "Ignorancy" at its finest.


If they dumped the debt it would mean the U.S. won't be able to sell the debt bonds at the low interest they currently do.

No one would buy the new bonds.

It would be pretty bad news.



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: Waterglass
Direct from the Tehran Times!!! So where else would you expect me to get this from? CNN? Nah


China continues buying Iranian LPG


According to Ship tracking data, Kpler estimates that at least five supertankers loaded Iranian LPG in May and June heading for China. That would equate to around $100 million of the gas, according to Bloomberg calculations. Chinese buyers turned to Iran after Beijing slapped a 25 percent tariff on the gas imports from U.S. last August as the trade tussle heated up between the two nations. Iran accounted for around a third of imports in April, before Donald Trump imposed new sanctions on the country in May, aiming to block its energy exports. To avoid running afoul of the U.S. sanctions, LPG importers in Asia’s largest economy would have to turn to more expensive supplies from elsewhere in the Middle East or Africa.


Are you suggesting that the US can now tell China who it is allowed to purchase goods from?

How exactly would that work?



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

www.investopedia.com...


The Bottom Line Pegging the yuan is a strategic policy move that provides crucial benefits to the Chinese economy. Using this approach, the People's Bank of China increases the appeal of Chinese exports on the global marketplace and helps fuel greater prosperity for China. While many governments harness expansionary policies in the hope that they will generate the intended results, China has proved the efficacy of its currency peg over many years.
its been pegged to the dollar since 1994 and they have no desire to change that as it helps them in trade as they artifically devalue their own currency to boost trade

www.investopedia.com...

Skeptical Views Despite the IMF response, many doubted China’s commitment to free-market values arguing that the new exchange rate policy was still akin to a “managed float;" some charged that the devaluation was just another intervention, and the yuan’s value would continue to be closely monitored and managed by the PBOC. Also, the devaluation occurred just days after data showed a sharp fall in China’s exports – down 8.3% in July 2015 from the previous year – evidence that the government's slashing of interest rates and fiscal stimulus had not been as effective as hoped. Thus, skeptics rejected the market-oriented-reform rationale instead of interpreting the devaluation as a desperate attempt to stimulate China's sluggish economy and keep exports from falling further. China's economy depends significantly on its exported goods. By devaluating its currency, the Asian giant lowered the price of its exports and gained a competitive advantage in the international markets. A weaker currency also made China's imports costlier, thus spurring the production of substitute products at home to aid the domestic industry. Washington was particularly incensed because many U.S. politicians had been claiming for years that China had kept its currency artificially low at the expense of American exporters. Some believed that China’s devaluation of the yuan was just the beginning of a currency war that could lead to increasing trade tensions.
they dont want to float their currency as it would hurt them not boost them and facilitate their trade shenanigans


www.proactiveinvestors.com... older link from 2015

Pros to Letting the Yuan Float Helps U.S. Exports – and European exports, for that matter. If the playing field is leveled and all of a sudden China may not be the best solution for cheap goods and production, the attractiveness of U.S. and European goods inherently rises. That could even lead to some manufacturing jobs returning to the U.S. Promotes New Types of Investment in China – if China and multinationals lose their “subsidy” for expanding the manufacturing sector, it could free up capital for investment in other areas like expanding the service economy and promoting domestic consumption. Empowers the Chinese Consumer – speaking of domestic consumption, the middle class in China is one of the fastest growing demographics in the world. If their currency goes a longer way towards purchasing goods in the global economy, everybody wins. Creates New Wealth for Emerging Industrial Countries – if the cost of manufacturing in China rises with a rising yuan it could open new doors for other industrial nations with cheap labor, like Mexico and Vietnam. If there’s one thing you can be fairly certain of, it’s that multinationals will find a place with cheaper cost of production and move there. Doing so could help an emerging economy really gain steam and create new wealth. Cons to a Rapidly Appreciating Yuan Chinese Exports Hurt – If the manufacturing boom slows or even contracts, it could affect China’s overall growth rate. As the second largest economy in the world, China is a hugely meaningful component to global GDP. Softening global GDP could threaten stock prices. Softens China’s Demand for U.S. Treasuries - China sells yuan and buys dollars to control the currency, but they recycle those dollars to buy U.S. Treasuries. Doing so helps the US finance our budget deficits. If the yuan floats, Chinese demand could sap. Higher Production Costs for Some U.S. Multinationals – as production costs rise, those could get passed along to the consumer. Over time, those multinationals will likely seek cheaper production and move operations (a positive), but in the short term it could affect prices.
so that was there explanation back in 2015



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: Waterglass

www.cnbc.com...


The countries went from less than 20% of the world’s GPD in 2003 to about 30% 10 years later. China and India were growing exponentially, while rising commodity prices kept Brazil and Russia in good pace to meet O’Neill’s predictions. But shortly after the financial crisis, external factors combined with serious internal turmoil proved too much for the group. While China and India are growing steadily today, Russia and Brazil have gone in the opposite direction.
Brazil isnt exactly the biggest fan of china these days after electing tropical trump

economictimes.indiatimes.com... but they are going after pakistan now in terror related monies issues at india and surprisingly chinas behest now



posted on Jun, 21 2019 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: underwerks

Funny how we only have a problem with countries who nationalize their oil and gas industries. Oh well. I'm sure it's just coincidence


Well, to be fair we don't have a problem with Norway.



Yet.


We're watching you Norwegians. One more step towards affordable healthcare...



posted on Jun, 22 2019 @ 04:22 AM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz
28% to be exact. China knows they have the US by the balls.


And the US has China by the balls. In the great scheme of things country debt can be written off. That said, China is't very healthy when it comes to debt, both national and civil.

China debt



posted on Jun, 22 2019 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Nice response Blue



posted on Jun, 22 2019 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

We have already sent our pre invasion forces into China. KFC, Pizza Hut, McDonalds and now DOUGHNUT shops. In fact Burger King wants to open over 1000 burger joints. Heres the link.

Oh and those artery blocker Ramen noodles!

USA Fast Food in China



posted on Jun, 23 2019 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: uncommitted




Are you suggesting that the US can now tell China who it is allowed to purchase goods from?


You fooking kidding me. We cant say sheet to China. All I am pointing out is that when sheet hits the fan they always side with those smaller bad boy countries. That's all.

BUUUUUUUUUT:

We hit em in their shorts FAST FOOD!!

We have already sent our pre invasion forces into China. KFC, Pizza Hut, McDonalds and now DOUGHNUT shops. In fact Burger King wants to open over 1000 burger joints. Heres the link.

Oh and those artery blocker Ramen noodles!

USA Fast Food in China
edit on 23-6-2019 by Waterglass because: added



posted on Jun, 24 2019 @ 04:45 AM
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originally posted by: Waterglass
a reply to: uncommitted




Are you suggesting that the US can now tell China who it is allowed to purchase goods from?


You fooking kidding me. We cant say sheet to China. All I am pointing out is that when sheet hits the fan they always side with those smaller bad boy countries. That's all.

BUUUUUUUUUT:

We hit em in their shorts FAST FOOD!!

We have already sent our pre invasion forces into China. KFC, Pizza Hut, McDonalds and now DOUGHNUT shops. In fact Burger King wants to open over 1000 burger joints. Heres the link.

Oh and those artery blocker Ramen noodles!

USA Fast Food in China


Right. You aren't after intellectually vibrant discourse then.




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