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What is the large star next to the moon?

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posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: Akragon

Once the moon gets out of the way, it should be super bright.




posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 06:26 AM
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It was actually at it's closest to Earth, about 5 days ago: Jupiter June 12th
edit on 17-6-2019 by SpaceJockey1 because: Spelling


Also there's another special Moon/Jupiter event happening this Father's Day: Strawberry Moon
edit on 17-6-2019 by SpaceJockey1 because: Additional info added



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 06:55 AM
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You were correct. You did see a star. One that failed to ignite.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 07:07 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

wow that's crazy if it does happen, would the gravity pull the rocks toward Jupiter? Or could one spit out toward us in anger? going to look for what you say.. love these kind of threads.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: charlyv
a reply to: Sabrechucker
a reply to: xenthuin

Yes, Jupiter is really bright.

If you have a smart phone, download the Google Sky Map app. It is indispensible for queries like that.


Coincidentally, I downloaded that last night. Sky View is another good one.

Thought I'd need something after biting the bullet and buying a semi reasonable telescope.. well the reviews are decent anyway..



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 07:19 AM
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posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 07:25 AM
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originally posted by: visitedbythem
Get the skyview ap for your phone. It will tell you what every heavenly body is


I discovered that the ISS is under my house.. those sneaky buggers.. lol



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: Sabrechucker

It's called the sun, in the grand scheme of things.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: roadgravel

well we all know that Jupiter as big as it is protects us, I'm wondering about a collision between the two moons if it's violent enough to spew a 100 mile asteroid at us?



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 08:57 AM
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a reply to: roadgravel

would be a grand sight to see eh?



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: Sabrechucker
a reply to: dragonridr

I'l be damned... I am looking at That star "Jupiter" threw the binocs and I see a solid white light and a "fuzz" of rainbow like "unformed" rings. It's a barrage of lights. very dim but evident. Are those the gases?


Would be cool to understand the "rainbow" of lights emanating from Jupiter. Moved to a darker area recently and was completely dazzled by Jupiter. I only ever saw it as a "bright star" in the past.



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: Sabrechucker

jupiter will be bright again tonight if the sky is clear. It's a magnificient sight next to the Moon.

During winter you will see Sirius moving across the same part



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 02:36 PM
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originally posted by: Sabrechucker
a reply to: visitedbythem

Ok thanks. was taking the dog for a stroll and noticed it. Seemed rather bright..maybe due to time of day.



The moon moves separately from the rest of the sky, moving a few degrees to the east every night against the background of stars compared to the night before. So every night there are different stars in the sky near the moon.

This all means that due to the apparent motion of the Moon relative to the stars and planets, such as Jupiter, the Moon may look like it's next to Jupiter last night, but over the course of the next few nights the two bodies will grow farther and farther apart from each other in our night sky.

Furthermore, Jupiter may have looked like it was to the west of the Moon last night (June 16), but the night before (June 15) it was to the east of the Moon. Back on June 12, it wasn't really close to the Moon at all, which is probably why you noticed it last night.

By the way, planets such as Jupiter also move independently than the star background, but do so much more slowly than the Moon, and the motion of the planets relative to the stars is not easily discerned one night to the next. So this movement can be virtually ignored when talking about the location in the sky of Jupiter over the span of a few days.


edit on 6/17/2019 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 02:41 PM
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It's a "Baby Moon." People sing songs about it all the time. You've never seen it before?



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

Don't forget Venus, a regular companion of the moon (visually), and can often be seen first in the evening.
edit on 17-6-2019 by ADVISOR because: Spelling



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 09:44 PM
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originally posted by: gallop

originally posted by: visitedbythem
Get the skyview ap for your phone. It will tell you what every heavenly body is


I discovered that the ISS is under my house.. those sneaky buggers.. lol

Oh You got the ap!

Isnt that fun? By the way, I love your Avatar! My real name means lover of horses. Have a great evening




posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 10:25 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

I am looking over the info on that link right now. Incredible..the things ya don't know...wow



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 10:45 PM
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The planets generally take the same path across the sky as the Sun and Moon. This makes it easy to ID them on the "ecliptic".



posted on Jun, 17 2019 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

Doesn't it seem that there is more going on up there the last few years? Discount the drone activity, I remember when the North star really stood out..I couldn't even tell you where it is on a clear night.



posted on Jun, 18 2019 @ 04:58 AM
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a reply to: Sabrechucker

Don't worry, Polaris is still there. The Big Dipper is still pointing to it.




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