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Fishing Is Now Under Attack By PETA

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posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 07:49 AM
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Been fishing my whole life and asked myself do fish feel pain?

If I had a face full of hooks attached to a rope with someone yanking on the the other end I'm going where ever that rope leads me.

On the other hand when I catch fish they fight back even with a face full of hooks and me yanking on the line to get them in.

I do believe fish feel pain but not like we do.

I'm a serial fish murderer. I've killed over 100 fish these past two weeks. I have a freezer full of walleye. Been getting my limit every trip.

In my state it is illegal to harass fishermen.




posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 10:10 AM
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"It's Official: Fish Feel Pain":




Right now, the Burns brothers export the cod they catch to Japan, China, France, Spain, Denmark, and Norway. The fact that the fish are humanely harvested has not been a big draw for their main buyers, Michael says, but he expects that will change. He and his team have been speaking with various animal welfare organizations to develop new standards and certifications for humanely caught wild fish. “It will become more common,” Michael says. “A lot of people out there are concerned with where their food comes from and how it’s handled.”

Meanwhile, the vast majority of the trillions of fish slaughtered annually are killed in ways that likely cause them immense pain. The truth is that even the adoption of humane slaughter methods in more progressive countries has not been entirely or even primarily motivated by ethics. Rather, such changes are driven by profit. Studies have shown that reducing stress in farmed and caught fish, killing them swiftly and efficiently with minimal struggle, improves the quality of the meat that eventually makes it to market. The flesh of fish killed humanely is often smoother and less blemished. When we treat fish well, we don’t really do it for their sake; we do it for ours.

“I’ve always had a natural empathy for animals and had no reason to exclude fish,” Brown says. “At that park [in Melbourne], they didn’t have any concern that there were fish in there and they might need some water. There was no attempt to save them or house them whatsoever. I was shocked by that at that age, and I still see that kind of callous disregard for fish in people today in all sorts of contexts. In all the time since we discovered the first evidence for pain in fish, I don’t think public perception has moved an ounce.” Read more: www.smithsonianmag.com...


www.smithsonianmag.com...

There you have it, so instead of letting your fish suffocate to death which is making it suffer, have a little empathy and kill it quickly by hitting it with a blunt object on the head; my dad use to do this, but he knew exactly where to strike and he also just cut off it's head. Another way, is put the fish in a cooler full of ice to freeze it to death.

The video below shows where to strike the fish on the head as well as where to insert a sharp knife directly into the brain for an immediate kill. GRAPHIC

www.youtube.com...
edit on 16CDT10America/Chicago026101030 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6
I’ve been Deep sea fishing twice... was really quite the experience.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 02:32 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: chr0naut

Science is a bit more complex than that.
www.sciencedaily.com...
Obviously they respond to stimuli, but they lack some features (such as a neocortex) which is instrumental in science's understanding of the sensation of "pain."


There are parts of that article that throw doubts on 'if humans feel pain' and they suggest that pain is only an emotional and consciousness related effect in humans.

So, the article itself is attempting to redefine pain as something that comes from a human (only) intellect. Yet we know that pain happens for even quite basic terrestrial creatures because of their cries, avoidance and responses to it. So the argument is simply invalid.

It is a type of ignorant bigotry similar to the 'scientific' studies of 150 years ago that suggested that some humans weren't as evolved as others, or even conscious, based upon simple pigmentation or other unrelated ethnically identifying features.

It is clear that the pain response is a basic survival mechanism for all creatures with a nervous system. In fact, the pain response is probably the primary natural selection advantage of having a nervous system in the first place. It allowed reaction from, and escape from, situations dangerous to the creature.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Yes, but an animal can feel pain and then again, they can feel pain. Seriously, if a snake felt pain the same way we humans do, they wouldn't be prone to sit atop a heat rock long enough to give themselves second and third degree burns like they have been known to.

It isn't that they don't feel pain. They do, but they clearly don't feel it the same way a human does. How many people do you know who would expressly sit atop a hot rock long enough to blister themselves or worse? And we're not talking about a searing temp, more of a gradual heat burn.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 04:55 PM
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But the voice for a generation told me it's okay to eat fish ‘cause they don't have any feelings.

I don’t know. Something in the way, I guess.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Blood is the great spoiler. The process I have always used for fish is to cut the gill rakers or cut the tail behind the anal fin (all fish have a major vein that runs there) and then ideally bleed the fish out while it is in the water on a rope or in a live well. The fish will slowly bleed out and the heart will pump the majority of the blood out of the fish, leaving the meat much fresher and less quick to spoil. If the fish is sea run, it should be gutted within a few minutes of death to reduce the migration of intestinal worms through the stomach lining and into the meat. They start migrating to the exits immediately upon the host's death.

Never club a fish. It introduces stress hormones (adrenaline) which impart a taste in the meat as well as speeding up spoilage. I don't own a fish priest nor do I advocate their usage. If someone is sensitive to the point where they want their fish killed before it bleeds out and I'm "guiding" them, I will capitulate in so much as I will take a fillet knife and scramble the fish's brain with it in a single stroke, but that's not necessary as far as I am concerned.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: InTheLight

Blood is the great spoiler. The process I have always used for fish is to cut the gill rakers or cut the tail behind the anal fin (all fish have a major vein that runs there) and then ideally bleed the fish out while it is in the water on a rope or in a live well. The fish will slowly bleed out and the heart will pump the majority of the blood out of the fish, leaving the meat much fresher and less quick to spoil. If the fish is sea run, it should be gutted within a few minutes of death to reduce the migration of intestinal worms through the stomach lining and into the meat. They start migrating to the exits immediately upon the host's death.

Never club a fish. It introduces stress hormones (adrenaline) which impart a taste in the meat as well as speeding up spoilage. I don't own a fish priest nor do I advocate their usage. If someone is sensitive to the point where they want their fish killed before it bleeds out and I'm "guiding" them, I will capitulate in so much as I will take a fillet knife and scramble the fish's brain with it in a single stroke, but that's not necessary as far as I am concerned.


Great advice, thanks.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny



this practice causes "severe physiological stress that they (the fish) often die of shock."


This is false. The only time this happens is if the fish has taken the hook deep into its belly and to remove it you have to rip the hook out. I would love to never throw a fish back for this, but the fish and game demands I do in most situations. I've caught and released hundreds (maybe thousands) of fish in my life. I can count on my hands the number of them that died afterwards.



"It's called the food chain. Do they get upset when a lion eats a gazelle?" Or, when a Grizzly rips open a salmon?


Or how about when a house cat rips a mouse or bird apart for nothing more than a good time. PETA ought to hate cats.

PETA: Poorly Equipped Thinkers Association.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 07:42 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: chr0naut

Yes, but an animal can feel pain and then again, they can feel pain. Seriously, if a snake felt pain the same way we humans do, they wouldn't be prone to sit atop a heat rock long enough to give themselves second and third degree burns like they have been known to.

It isn't that they don't feel pain. They do, but they clearly don't feel it the same way a human does. How many people do you know who would expressly sit atop a hot rock long enough to blister themselves or worse? And we're not talking about a searing temp, more of a gradual heat burn.


How many animals do you know that voluntarily get tattooe'd, or have piercings.

What about those humans who march, cognizant of the risks of injury and loss of body parts, into the line of fire?

It is obvious that humans must not feel pain.


edit on 11/6/2019 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 09:04 PM
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I used to sport fish, but I stopped. I fish if I plan to eat the fish. That makes sense. Making a sport of catching animals stopped making sense to me, even if a fish isn't sentient, or can or can not feel pain.

PETA imo lost their way a long while back. There could be a goal there of stopping animal abuse, keep people from domesticating what are clearly wild animals, stop sea shows from imprisoning dolphins and whales and other animals for profit. But they went overboard, and were hypocrites as well.

I love animals and nature, and won't go out of my way to make one suffer. I don't go out of my way to kill bugs, or exert my dominance over "lesser" species. I will swat a mosquito, I do eat meat, I am an omnivore - it happens. But PETA went bat# crazy.

I don't care for or endorse sports that exist at the expense of other living creatures that have no say in the matter. Horse racing, dog racing, sport fishing, so on. But humans are omnivores. They eat meat and plants. That is like.. nature. PETA is pathetically so full of themselves.



posted on Jun, 11 2019 @ 10:23 PM
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When I fish, I usually use lures, which replicate prey to larger fish.
Sometimes I use live bait, which is prey to larger fish.

Either way, when that larger fish attacks my bait, what do we think it was trying to do?
Make friends?

No, it was trying to viciously kill and eat smaller prey.




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