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Jupiter moon's to be seen by binoculars this month

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posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 04:08 PM
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Just saw this bit of news and figured would let others know as well.

MIght have to pull out mine at home and bring them to work this month and see if I can get a good look. Even though we can see it with them not sure how well we will see it. still think you would really need decent telescope for any detail and what not.


Jupiter's Moons



TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) - The largest planet in the solar system will put on a show for stargazers throughout June. According to NASA, Jupiter is at its biggest and brightest and will be visible to naked eye when it passes Earth later this month. The planet will appear bright throughout the night, even in cities. Stargazers should be able to spot several of its moons with nothing more than a pair of binoculars or a small telescope, according to NASA. You may even catch a glimpse of the cloudy bands that encircle the planet. NASA shared more detail in its June 2019 Skywatching Tips.




posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 04:28 PM
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I'm an amateur astronomer, John Dobson himself got me interested in Astronomy and currently own 4 telescopes and off the bat I read it as Fake News....

But if you have a clear night and are standing atop the Everest....maybe
edit on 6-6-2019 by manuelram16 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: manuelram16

Yea, kind of questioned it my self hence why mentioned telescope as well.



posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: manuelram16

I see Jupiter and the moons every year with my binoculars, and I have a lot of (online) friends that take pictures of it and the moons, showing the bands too.
I can also take pictures and see the bands and moons, but the moons have to be in a completely different shot with a wider aperture to make them show, you can't (or I can't) take a one shot Jupiter and moons shot.

I have 10x50 binoculars.



posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 06:56 PM
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What? You guys don't have binoculars made of two Hubble monocles?

Easy peazy to see with mine.



posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: manuelram16

8 years ago (more or less) I took a photograph of Jupiter with my Samsumg WB5000, nothing special, and some of the satellites were visible.



I took the photo because it looked to me, with the naked eye, that there was something more than just one bright light.



posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 07:34 PM
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originally posted by: OzManHero
Just saw this bit of news and figured would let others know as well.

MIght have to pull out mine at home and bring them to work this month and see if I can get a good look. Even though we can see it with them not sure how well we will see it. still think you would really need decent telescope for any detail and what not.


Correct, you will not be able to see detail with binoculars. The moons will just look like little points of light, as will Jupiter, kind of like ArMaP's picture but not as good.


originally posted by: manuelram16
I'm an amateur astronomer, John Dobson himself got me interested in Astronomy and currently own 4 telescopes and off the bat I read it as Fake News....

But if you have a clear night and are standing atop the Everest....maybe


What are you basing that on? I've seen them through binoculars. It's possible if you have a good pair and are in a place with low enough light pollution.



posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 08:59 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
a reply to: manuelram16

8 years ago (more or less) I took a photograph of Jupiter with my Samsumg WB5000, nothing special, and some of the satellites were visible.



I took the photo because it looked to me, with the naked eye, that there was something more than just one bright light.
That's a really cool photo, thanks for sharing. It's interesting how much Jupiter looks like an actual star in it, you can easily see the moon's are reflective but Jupiter looks like it has its own light source.
Must have something to do with the reflective qualities of gas vs rock/solids.



posted on Jun, 6 2019 @ 10:36 PM
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The first thing you need to do is find Jupiter. I know my star patterns, but not where planets are. I could identify Mars a couple of times, but it's red color is what gave it away.



posted on Jun, 7 2019 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

It's generally one of the brightest objects in the night sky. Use something like Stellarium software to confirm it


As for the OP, I've seen Jupiter's moons through binoculars, but it was in a very low light plution area.



posted on Jun, 7 2019 @ 12:20 AM
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All you have to do is find the ecliptic, and all the planets that are visible presently, will be on that line.

Today, finding most any celestial object is super easy, with Google Sky , just point it at the sky on your smart phone...

Binoculars always show Jupiter's moons, but as specks of light. Best to use a good pair of 10x50 binoculars. High end Bushnell and Bausch & Lombe will have the best resolving power, especially with the models that zoom up to 25x.

Most telescopes resolve Jupiter's bands fairly well, but you will usually be disappointed with the seeing conditions as the Earth's atmosphere sometimes makes viewing with anything above a set of binoculars very frustrating.

Best leave the telescopes to the diligent amateurs with deep enough pockets to own an instrument worth having. There is so much crap on the market. In my perspective, if the instrument is a Celstron or Meade, you will have to spend a grand or more to be a happy astronomer.
edit on 7-6-2019 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught


This Questar standard 3 1/2 inch cassegrain quartz optics desktop telescope is by far the most versatile and superior small instrument you can buy. Price ranges from about $3k to $5k used. Fits in a nice little case. Drool on!

edit on 7-6-2019 by charlyv because: content



posted on Jun, 7 2019 @ 02:37 AM
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but Jupiter's largest moons are visible in binoculars all the time (as long as you can see Jupiter in the night sky).

Seems like things got taken out of context for a sensationalising/clickbaity headline, again.

BTW, here's my pic of Jupiter and its largest moons, taken with a Canon DSLR and 300mm lens:




posted on Jun, 7 2019 @ 06:45 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Correct me if I'm wrong, but Jupiter's largest moons are visible in binoculars all the time (as long as you can see Jupiter in the night sky).


As far as I know, you are correct. Every time I attempted to see Jupiter's main moons through binoculars, I could see them.

I think at least two or three of the four Galilean Moons are always visible with binoculars. Maybe they might brighter this month, but being able to see them isn't new.



posted on Jun, 7 2019 @ 08:19 AM
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originally posted by: BlackIbanez

originally posted by: ArMaP
a reply to: manuelram16

8 years ago (more or less) I took a photograph of Jupiter with my Samsumg WB5000, nothing special, and some of the satellites were visible.



I took the photo because it looked to me, with the naked eye, that there was something more than just one bright light.
That's a really cool photo, thanks for sharing. It's interesting how much Jupiter looks like an actual star in it, you can easily see the moon's are reflective but Jupiter looks like it has its own light source.
Must have something to do with the reflective qualities of gas vs rock/solids.


It also has to do with the fact that Jupiter is much bigger, so it reflects a larger overall amount of light from the sun. Some of the moons have a lot of ice, which should be very reflective too, but they're so much smaller they just can't reflect enough light.



posted on Jun, 7 2019 @ 08:20 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
The first thing you need to do is find Jupiter. I know my star patterns, but not where planets are. I could identify Mars a couple of times, but it's red color is what gave it away.


These days you can just download an app that shows you where everything is. I have one called Star Chart. You hold your phone up and turn around and it shows you whatever is in the direction you're facing.



posted on Jun, 7 2019 @ 12:00 PM
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Here's something to check your area for observations:

darksitefinder.com.../37.21/-92.92



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