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PARIS AIR SHOW 2019 warm up - BOEING 787 + AIRBUS A350 Air SHOW

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posted on Jun, 1 2019 @ 04:00 PM
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I found this video of some pilots practicing in commercial airliners. Pretty impressive because I was not aware that airliners could do verticals like in this video. Check it out!







posted on Jun, 1 2019 @ 04:12 PM
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a reply to: TheGreatWork

No extraneous weight, which means minimal fuel load. That results in them being effectively overpowered.



posted on Jun, 1 2019 @ 04:31 PM
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I have a love hate relationship with big planes. Love because I just love them and their size and power, hate because I regularly dream that one of them falls towards me and kills me.

I have [fear] goosepimples when I see large crafts make strange unnatural movements, but at the same time I feel compelled to watch.

The video could have been soooo much better [worse] if the person who took the video would have included some background so you can see properly how they fly and how they hang in the air.
As it is it doesn't look all too impressive on that video, even though it is.



posted on Jun, 1 2019 @ 04:31 PM
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dp

edit on 1-6-2019 by Hecate666 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2019 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: TheGreatWork

No extraneous weight, which means minimal fuel load. That results in them being effectively overpowered.


I see. So is this also the case with the C-17? Or can it still do it loaded?



posted on Jun, 1 2019 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: TheGreatWork

The steep climb, yes. The other maneuvers, no. The more weight, the less they can push the aircraft. Any time you see them at an airshow, they're about as light as they can get away with.
edit on 6/1/2019 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2019 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: TheGreatWork

The steep climb, yes. The other maneuvers, no. The more weight, the less they can push the aircraft. Any time you see them at an airshow, they're about as light as they can get away with.



You can tell buy the HARD tight banking they do, as well as the steep incline. Really fun to watch them train around here.

Oh BTW..these are C-17 's from the 911th air wing



posted on Jun, 2 2019 @ 01:12 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

C17 flew over my house taking off out of DMAFB today. Always jaw dropping.



posted on Jun, 2 2019 @ 01:13 AM
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a reply to: PilSungMtnMan

One of the E-4Bs was there the other day.



posted on Jun, 2 2019 @ 02:24 AM
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Maybe someone who knows Airbus can answer this.. It used to be the computer flight management system restricted the aircraft to a max bank angle of 60 degrees or there about.. With the Airbus the computer is number one and the pilots are number two...

Boeing on the other hand you could completely roll the aircraft if you needed or wanted to.. Different philosophy ... Some will remember the Airbus that ended up in the trees during an airshow several years ago.. If I remember correctly they did everything to blame something else but the fly by wire computer system..

There were stories (maybe fake news in the Boeing pilot community) where an airbus at LAX (auto land) had to be toed off the runway because the computer would not let the aircraft exit the runway ..

I never flew the airbus so it is an honest question..Never wanted to either... I do know you can put on one hell of an airshow (simulator) to include rolls and even a loop with a B737-700 and even a 737-500.. 700 had more power.. I never tried with the 800 or 900 simulator... but I figure rolls would have been no problem... Loops too if altitude was available....

My simulated stuff was max power take off gear up flaps up pitch up and roll the aircraft then gain altitude and reverse for a low pass at the speed of heat and do a loop when barber poll was achieved... the over the top and then the bottom of the loop was supposed to be 250 AGL. I never hit the runway or crashed but I did not always come out at 250 feet either.. It was fun but I never rolled the real thing as I liked my job.. A Captain Bole (Boeing test Pilot) rolled the B707 during a low pass over a big foot ball game way back when.. He almost got fired by Boeing.. I think that was his name as it has been a long time ago.. The 707 and the 727 you could obviously roll but if you did not know what you were doing with the 727 it became an instant lawn dart if you were doing stuff low level.



posted on Jun, 2 2019 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

For the Airbus Frogjets, under the Flight Control System Normal Law, pitch is limited to 30 degrees up, 15 degrees down, and roll is limited to 67 degrees. And the computer does some really weird things. In most airplanes, roll rate is somewhat airspeed dependent, so with a given stick (yoke) deflection, the roll rate increases with airspeed. Not so with the Airbus. So, you can't roll or loop it, so what good is it?



posted on Jun, 2 2019 @ 05:41 PM
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originally posted by: F4guy
a reply to: 727Sky

For the Airbus Frogjets, under the Flight Control System Normal Law, pitch is limited to 30 degrees up, 15 degrees down, and roll is limited to 67 degrees. And the computer does some really weird things. In most airplanes, roll rate is somewhat airspeed dependent, so with a given stick (yoke) deflection, the roll rate increases with airspeed. Not so with the Airbus. So, you can't roll or loop it, so what good is it?



I had thought it was around 60 degrees so thank you for the info. I guess if you need a 70 degree bank to miss a mountain top or recover from an unusual attitude you are SOL.

Where is that "miss a mountain top button" was the last thing they would have on the voice recorder I suppose...



posted on Jun, 2 2019 @ 05:55 PM
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I hope the Airbus 350 series is going to be quieter than the 320s.

What i mean, is the howling noise from the vents on the underside of each wing. It sounds like its coming in to land in my back garden at about 10,000 feet its that loud.

Its not been as loud since the 2014 fix with vortex generators but still scares the hell out of me sometimes.




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