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Mars by 2033 - - - or 2060

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posted on May, 18 2019 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: NthOther

Suppose that depends.

Did the "Orange man" somehow touch or do something inappropriate?


Jokes aside you have lost me im afraid.
edit on 18-5-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 19 2019 @ 02:51 AM
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whoever is foolish enough to get on that spaceship, that will be the last time they see earth.

considering how many astronauts died JUST preparing for nasa. i think its like 24%. they had astronauts blowing up on the tarmac.

good luck to them, even if its on tv, cgi is near perfect now, it will be 3d perfect by then. so we will never know if its real or fake, just like the original moon landings.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: dantanna
considering how many astronauts died JUST preparing for nasa. i think its like 24%. they had astronauts blowing up on the tarmac.


Not 24 percent, but 24 astronauts have died in total during NASA training and missions. Out of hundreds of astronauts over the history of the program. It's not a safe job to be sure, but it's not extraordinarily dangerous either.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 01:55 PM
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As of December 2018, in-flight accidents have killed 18 astronauts, in four separate incidents. The current statistical fatality rate is 3.2 percent.



There have been a total of five fatal in-flight accidents, three of them flew above the Kármán line, and one was intended to do so. In each case, the entire crew was killed.



In addition to accidents during spaceflights, 13 astronauts, test pilots, and other personnel have been killed during training and test flights.


List of spaceflight-related accidents and incidents

There are many non-fatal incidents during spaceflight that I never heard about. The above link has some interesting info in it.


The mission featured the world's first spacewalk, by Alexei Leonov. After his twelve minutes outside, Leonov's spacesuit inflated in the vacuum to the point where he could not reenter the airlock. He opened a valve to allow some of the suit's pressure to bleed off, and was barely able to get back inside the capsule after suffering side effects of the bends. Because the spacecraft was so cramped, the crew could not keep to their reentry schedule and landed 386 km off course in deep forest. They spent a night sheltering in the capsule from the cold, and a second night in a temporary hut built by rescuers before skiing with them to a clearing where a helicopter flew them to Perm.


This is all spaceflight not just NASA. I think 3.2 percent is pretty good, wish it was 0% though. Apollo 1 is not counted in that 3.2 percent, I am guessing thats the


astronauts blowing up on the tarmac
mentioned in a post, unless that meant the deaths during training and testing.


edit on 19-5-2019 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars

As of December 2018, in-flight accidents have killed 18 astronauts, in four separate incidents. The current statistical fatality rate is 3.2 percent.



There have been a total of five fatal in-flight accidents, three of them flew above the Kármán line, and one was intended to do so. In each case, the entire crew was killed.



In addition to accidents during spaceflights, 13 astronauts, test pilots, and other personnel have been killed during training and test flights.


List of spaceflight-related accidents and incidents

There are many non-fatal incidents during spaceflight that I never heard about. The above link has some interesting info in it.


The mission featured the world's first spacewalk, by Alexei Leonov. After his twelve minutes outside, Leonov's spacesuit inflated in the vacuum to the point where he could not reenter the airlock. He opened a valve to allow some of the suit's pressure to bleed off, and was barely able to get back inside the capsule after suffering side effects of the bends. Because the spacecraft was so cramped, the crew could not keep to their reentry schedule and landed 386 km off course in deep forest. They spent a night sheltering in the capsule from the cold, and a second night in a temporary hut built by rescuers before skiing with them to a clearing where a helicopter flew them to Perm.


This is all spaceflight not just NASA. I think 3.2 percent is pretty good, wish it was 0% though. Apollo 1 is not counted in that 3.2 percent, I am guessing thats the


astronauts blowing up on the tarmac
mentioned in a post, unless that meant the deaths during training and testing.



Yeah the 24 count I gave was all astronauts killed in NASA missions, whether in-flight or during training. Compared to the hundreds that have been certified, that's less than 1% of them have died. If you separate it out to each individual mission/training session, the fatality rate is far lower than 1%.




 
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