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Sun Appears Much Darker Outside of Earth Atmosphere Than Under It - (olber's paradox?)

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posted on May, 18 2019 @ 06:50 AM
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a reply to: Artesia

Another example. Cameras meter to prevent over exposure. A camera is going to use shutter speed and aperture size to mute the intensity of bright objects. Another reason why the sun probably looks unnaturally dim in photos and film.




posted on May, 18 2019 @ 07:22 AM
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Nope, the Sun is blindingly white in space. Without the protective atmosphere, you'd get a sunburn pretty quick, it's unfiltered UV radiation.

Space walkers and Apollo astronauts wore sun shades for a reason.







The size of the Sun in images is entirely due to the focal length of the lens used.



posted on May, 18 2019 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: Artesia
Yet cameras supposedly recording or streaming from sats or craft outside of the atmosphere show our sun, Sol - supposedly a star - that looks like merely a streetlight in the distance, at best. Why?

Because cameras are not the same thing as our eyes, you just have to make a video yourself to see if the Sun looks exactly the same as you see it or not.



posted on May, 18 2019 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: Artesia
^ great point. NASA referenced olber's paradox, and indeed they are applying it inappropriately going off on a tangent about DISTANT stars in the NIGHT sky that olber's addresses.



No. The link you gave is providing an answer to this question:


Why is space black?


You saying NASA have provided an explanation for your bogus bit of strawman logic is not the same as them having done that. You are deliberately taking their answer out of context and pretending that it has been supplied to explain some nonsense you have fabricated. Doesn't appear to be NASA that's being dishonest here now does it?



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 06:42 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: Artesia

The lack of atmospheric magnification could explain why stars are never visible in space-station videos.


No exposure is what determines what is visible, If the Earth or part of it is in view the exposure is set for that so stars don't show it's that simple.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 06:50 AM
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a reply to: Artesia


This is how exposure works

Picture exposed for the sheet of paper so background buildings are overexposed.



Now exposed for the background an the paper now looks black.



It really is simple YOU have NO understanding of photography or optics so you can't understand what you see.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 04:42 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: Artesia
Yet cameras supposedly recording or streaming from sats or craft outside of the atmosphere show our sun, Sol - supposedly a star - that looks like merely a streetlight in the distance, at best. Why?

Because cameras are not the same thing as our eyes, you just have to make a video yourself to see if the Sun looks exactly the same as you see it or not.
You're not supposed to look at the sun because doing so can cause permanent damage to your eyes, as people who have tried to view eclipses without eye protection discovered. Maybe you can look at it when it's very low in the sky but then it's not as bright and may look orangish or reddish.

Man Who Suffered Eye Damage from Solar Eclipse Has This Warning

Louis Tomososki, who is now 70, said he was 16 when he watched a partial solar eclipse without any eye protection from his high-school baseball field in Portland, Oregon, according to Fox affiliate KPTV. He closed his left eye and viewed it with his right eye for about 20 seconds.

"That's all it took," Tomososki told KPTV. He now has a small blind spot in the center of his right eye, which hasn't gotten any better or worse since 1963.


a reply to: wmd_2008
Therefore there is a giant conspiracy over the color of a piece of paper, and I'll bet NASA is in on it, SpaceX too!
Wake up people and think for yourselves! When are you going to realize the true color of a sheet of white paper and stop believing the NASA lies? What color would that piece of paper be in space?

OK see how silly that sounds? But that's what the guys talking about a conspiracy of the brightness of the sun or the visibility of stars from the moon sound like. The translation is as you say, a lack of understanding how photography works. Nice demonstration by the way!



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 06:48 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
You're not supposed to look at the sun because doing so can cause permanent damage to your eyes, as people who have tried to view eclipses without eye protection discovered. Maybe you can look at it when it's very low in the sky but then it's not as bright and may look orangish or reddish.

I looked at the Sun several times when I was a kid and it didn't affect my vision.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP
Maybe you didn't look at it long enough to cause permanent damage but it's still not recommended and it has damaged the eyes of other people.

Anyway that reminds me of another fact that I don't think has been mentioned in this thread. When the Apollo 12 camera was pointed at the sun, the camera couldn't handle the direct light from the sun, it was so bright. The sunlight damaged the TV camera, so it's not just people that can damage their eyes by aiming at the sun too long. In this video, the sun is so bright from space that the camera can't handle being pointed at the sun for even a short time. That was enough to permanently damage the camera and there was no more useful TV from this TV camera after it was briefly pointed at the sun.



During the first Apollo 12 Moonwalk, Alan Bean was moving the camera from the side of the LM to the tripod. During the movement of the camera he accidentally pointed it into the sun, burning out the pickup tube. This was the last TV from the surface on Apollo 12.



posted on May, 20 2019 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Yes, it's easy to damage a camera by pointing it directly at the Sun, even new cameras, but that wasn't what I was suggesting, as you don't have to take a photo or make a video with the camera pointing directly to the Sun to see if the Sun looks the same as with the naked eye.




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