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CNN Chief Dr Gupta boasts Herd Immunity but 4 in 10 Measles cases originated from Vaccine itself

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posted on May, 8 2019 @ 11:56 PM
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a reply to: dashen

Attenuated viruses do reproduce, but they do not cause an infection because they reproduce slowly. Slowly enough for immunity to develop before they are widespread enough to cause disease.

Again, even if they were transmissible, they would still be an attenuated virus.
edit on 5/9/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:14 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Gotcha. Which means that statistically high numbers of vaccine reactions are mistaken for ourbreaks which prompts an uptick in vaccinations in the area which causes more vaccine reactions.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:21 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: dashen

A fever is not contagious. A rash is not contagious.
A reaction is not an infection.




5% of recipients of measles virus-containing vaccine experience rash and fever which may be indistinguishable from measles




Doesn't indistinguishable me exactly the same?
edit on 9-5-2019 by highvein because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: dashen

Vaccination reactions are not mistaken as outbreaks. If that were the case there would be no "wild" virus found.


The outbreak comes first but you are probably correct that outbreaks lead to more vaccinations, that would make sense but it's unfortunate that it takes an outbreak to spur action in some people. It does complicate things, which is what the article is about. Sorting them out.


edit on 5/9/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:26 AM
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a reply to: highvein




Doesn't indistinguishable me exactly the same?

Same symptoms, but not an infection. Also generally shorter duration and less severe.
edit on 5/9/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 01:07 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein




Doesn't indistinguishable me exactly the same?

Same symptoms, but not an infection. Also generally shorter duration and less severe.


I think that may have been what I had as a child.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 01:19 AM
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a reply to: highvein

If so, a booster might be a good idea. Unless you got two vaccinations.


edit on 5/9/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 01:35 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein

If so, a booster might be a good idea. Unless you got two vaccinations.



I can't remember. I will have to check my records.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 01:38 AM
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a reply to: highvein

In lieu of that, you can get an antibody test.

Or just take your chances, but immunization would be better. I'm old enough, I'm immune.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 03:59 AM
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a reply to: Artesia


This is crap because they are acting on false information namely being the phrase "herd Immunity." They are either doing this willingly or unwillingly and I dont know which but the concept of herd immunity just does not exist in science.

Herd Immunity is not even a theory because it has no scientific substance whatsoever.

Actually the phrase “herd immunity” is even less scientific than that. Its genesis was in the 1950s - 1960s when it was used in bovine (cattle) TB testing terminology.

Herd Immunity was a phrase used by veterinarians and farmers to describe a bovine herd, that was free of TB (Tuberculosis) following herd a herd testing program for TB. Herd-immunity… meant each dairy farmer’s herd was free of TB.

A decade or so ago, some clown, or was that actually some very clever person highly skilled in marketing and media studies, applied this term to human immunity, deliberately using public ignorance back against the public for who knows what gain?

Immunity can only be individual.

How can somebody who is not immunised catch a a disease from a herd of animals or a group human beings and not from an individual animal or human? . Similarly, how can anyone who has been vaccinated against a specific disease, catch a disease from an un-vaccinated person if the vaccine works as claimed? Would not the vaccine stop the infection each and every time?

When I say “immunity” I say it with my fingers crossed because around 87% of current Pertussis victims are fully immunised and about 90% in mumps. Some immunity!

‘Herd immunity” is not even a legitimate medical or scientific theory as it has no scientific substance whatsoever.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 04:27 AM
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a reply to: Azureblue

lying is undignified - but a common trait in anti vax loons



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 04:48 AM
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Sorry but this is just more vaccine lies and conspiracy.
The vaccines do not administer enough live virus to cause a contagious case of measles. EVER...
and vaccines do not cause autism.... EVER
So zero cases originated from people who got the vaccine. It just never happened. Its a lie.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 04:55 AM
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a reply to: dashen

That would assume that high numbers of people would react to the vaccine.
But the numbers do not support that at all.
Some people will react. A small percentage.
My youngest is very sensitive to vaccines. He got a fever with every one.
In two case, chicken pox and measles he developed a mild form of the rash.
In neither case was he contagious and the effects were gone in 24 hours. Not long enough to cause a public panic either.
And I had two other children who had no reaction at all.
So I doubt that the small number of people who might react to the vaccine could cause any public reaction what so ever.
You are over simplifying the phenomena.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 04:59 AM
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Interesting article here:

Public Health: Vaccine Myths Debunked

Here in the UK Measles is on the increase largely due to an idiot who claimed the MMR jab caused autism. This caused a wave of anti-vax hysteria hence why we now have an increase in measles cases. Measles is a nasty illness and is highly infectious but is easily preventable by vaccination.

These people have a lot to answer for.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 05:04 AM
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a reply to: highvein

Not at all. It means to the untrained they will appear to be the same.
The fact is that most reactions abate within 24 hours while the actual disease will last a week to ten days.

A fake Gucci handbag that is virtually indistinguishable from a real one is still not a real one if that helps make the distinction.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 05:07 AM
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a reply to: highvein

Its possible if you were vaccinated for sure.

Like I said, my youngest was sensitive to the vaccines.
I called the doctors office when he developed the rash. The nurse reassured me that he would be fine and that it was not a full blown case and it would abate in short order. She was correct. The next day he was fine as frog hair.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

Years ago when I travelled to Africa i had to have a typhoid jab and it made me quite ill for a couple of days. Pretty sure I was not actually infected. That's just how vaccinations work.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

Yes it is.
I had already had two children go through vaccines and one got mild fevers but not the rash like the last one did and when it happened I called right away because I'd never seen that reaction before.
That same kid just went to boot camp and had the same bad reaction to the shots he got. He was sick for a week he said.
edit on 592019 by Sillyolme because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: KrishnaTheGreat

Its not a disease that can be cured. It is a virus. A living organism that they would have to completely kill off from the planet to eliminate it.

Prevention in spreading it is the next thing.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 09:51 AM
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BS

If people were getting measles from the vaccine then almost all of the kids that get the mmr shot would get the measles.

It takes a couple of weeks for the process to work once you get the immunization so if you get the measles shortly after the immunization, you were previously exposed.

Immunizations are not 100% effective but people who spread the anti vax information should really consider themselves pro plague.

Unless your child cannot get immunized do to medical conditions, then you are foolish if you don't vaccinate them.



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