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Mars - Dusty and Gusty

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posted on May, 7 2019 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: Justoneman

Possibly and based on what I have read, we have some Scientist who think that Mars had a big hit and the atmosphere was blown off during that event that was the death blow to the possible life on Mars?


The earth had a rather big hit too ripping out our moon and it didn't wipe out our atmosphere, so I'm not sure about that theory. I'll just go with the cooling of the core leading to the loss of its magnetic field to have the atmosphere slowly bleed off, but then one needs to question why did its core solidify.




There is a another Mars myth about the Flood on Earth that we were hit with the water from the Mars event that wiped out the atmosphere. Plus, Earth has a magnetic field to trap the lightly magnetic molecules that make up our atmosphere.




posted on May, 7 2019 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman



Plus, Earth has a magnetic field to trap the lightly magnetic molecules that make up our atmosphere.

Which molecules are those? The magnetic ones, I mean.

Since the magnets on my refrigerator are much stronger than the Earth's magnetic field, does that mean there is a bunch of those molecules accumulated in my kitchen? My stereo speakers have some pretty strong magnets too.

I think it's gravity that mostly keeps our atmosphere here. Venus doesn't have a magnetic field but it has plenty of atmosphere.

edit on 5/7/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2019 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk




I don't know a lot about Mars


I've heard they try to determine if there's still some form of life there. They almost did but then, no they were wrong..
seems an awful waste of time trying everything spending so much money but still nothing. I'd say try IO for a change?



posted on May, 8 2019 @ 08:12 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Justoneman



Plus, Earth has a magnetic field to trap the lightly magnetic molecules that make up our atmosphere.

Which molecules are those? The magnetic ones, I mean.

Since the magnets on my refrigerator are much stronger than the Earth's magnetic field, does that mean there is a bunch of those molecules accumulated in my kitchen? My stereo speakers have some pretty strong magnets too.

I think it's gravity that mostly keeps our atmosphere here. Venus doesn't have a magnetic field but it has plenty of atmosphere.


I am wasting your time since you already have that information repeatedly from me.

But for the others I will answer

Virtually EVERY molecule has a weak magnetic attraction to other things except the Noble Gases Even then the larger ones though Neutral polarity for the whole series have some properties that make for fun nerd stuff.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 8 2019 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman


Virtually EVERY molecule has a weak magnetic attraction to other things except the Noble Gases Even then the larger ones though Neutral polarity for the whole series have some properties that make for fun nerd stuff.


Your wiki article mentions the electromagnetic force which holds electrons to their nucleus and allows atoms to form molecules or not, but it doesn't say anything about neutral atoms or molecules being held by magnetic fields. Electromagnetic force is an effect found between charged particles. Between electrons and protons, for example.

Now, if the atmosphere were to be composed of ions (like the ionosphere) magnetism would have an effect. But it isn't, not so much, it's mostly neutral particles so no, not held by the magnetosphere. Gravity is what does it. Venus has no magnetic field but it has lots of atmosphere.

edit on 5/8/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2019 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: Phage

yea yea,. Keep it to yourself your damaging the minds of other people.



posted on May, 8 2019 @ 11:30 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Xtrozero

Water at the poles is there, no doubt, in the form of ice. Highly probably in liquid form beneath the ice.


Does desublimation occur at Mar's poles?



posted on May, 8 2019 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: highvein

I would say yes, since there is a lot of water ice there.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein

I would say yes, since there is a lot of water ice there.



Do we have evidence of whether it is water or the vapor that turns to ice?



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:27 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Justoneman


Virtually EVERY molecule has a weak magnetic attraction to other things except the Noble Gases Even then the larger ones though Neutral polarity for the whole series have some properties that make for fun nerd stuff.


Your wiki article mentions the electromagnetic force which holds electrons to their nucleus and allows atoms to form molecules or not, but it doesn't say anything about neutral atoms or molecules being held by magnetic fields. Electromagnetic force is an effect found between charged particles. Between electrons and protons, for example.

Now, if the atmosphere were to be composed of ions (like the ionosphere) magnetism would have an effect. But it isn't, not so much, it's mostly neutral particles so no, not held by the magnetosphere. Gravity is what does it. Venus has no magnetic field but it has lots of atmosphere.

It would be awesome to go for a run on mars, if the right equipment to do it was available.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: highvein




Do we have evidence of whether it is water or the vapor that turns to ice?

No direct evidence that I know of but the low atmospheric pressure makes the existence of liquid water on the surface problematic.
edit on 5/9/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 01:02 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein




Do we have evidence of whether it is water or the vapor that turns to ice?

No direct evidence that I know of but the low atmospheric pressure makes the existence of liquid water on the surface problematic.


So it is more likely that the water on Mars is stored in either vapor or solid form. Is the atmosphere of mars sufficient to let water vapor escape the planet?



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: highvein

It could be in liquid form and briny, sealed underground or under the ice, but not on the surface. Not for long.

Theory is that most of the atmosphere and water did get carried away by the solar wind.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: highvein

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein




Do we have evidence of whether it is water or the vapor that turns to ice?

No direct evidence that I know of but the low atmospheric pressure makes the existence of liquid water on the surface problematic.


So it is more likely that the water on Mars is stored in either vapor or solid form. Is the atmosphere of mars sufficient to let water vapor escape the planet?

At low Atmospheric pressure it would Sublime or go from ice to gas very fast. If liquid hits the surface it would evaporate very fast. From the looks of things water will not stand on Mars as it is now. But all is not lost if it is under the soil.
edit on 9-5-2019 by Justoneman because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 06:24 PM
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Couldn't we have wind-farms on Mars, and then generate free electricity with a looong fiber optic cable through space for everyone?



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 06:42 PM
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originally posted by: halfoldman
Couldn't we have wind-farms on Mars, and then generate free electricity with a looong fiber optic cable through space for everyone?


We could have the wind farms I suppose. No way for the fiber of course.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 06:43 PM
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originally posted by: halfoldman
Couldn't we have wind-farms on Mars, and then generate free electricity with a looong fiber optic cable through space for everyone?

Too far. And besides, the wind on Mars is very weak. Enough to blow small particles around, but maybe not enough to push a windmill blade.

The Chinese will provide us with all the power we need with their solar powered microwave satellites beaming blistering hot dog cooking power into their collectors in the Gobi Desert.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: Justoneman

originally posted by: highvein

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein




Do we have evidence of whether it is water or the vapor that turns to ice?

No direct evidence that I know of but the low atmospheric pressure makes the existence of liquid water on the surface problematic.


So it is more likely that the water on Mars is stored in either vapor or solid form. Is the atmosphere of mars sufficient to let water vapor escape the planet?

At low Atmospheric pressure it would Sublime or go from ice to gas very fast. If liquid hits the surface it would evaporate very fast. From the looks of things water will not stand on Mars as it is now. But all is not lost if it is under the soil.


What could be added to it's atmosphere in order to get it to hold liquid water?



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: highvein

It needs more pressure in the atmosphere. we could melt the south pole and release a lot of co2, that would do it.



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