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The Bible Code proves God's existence

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posted on Apr, 30 2019 @ 06:31 PM
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I'm thinking we have very different ideas on the meaning of the word proof! I see no proof.




posted on Apr, 30 2019 @ 06:32 PM
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Sorry for the duplicate... The site slowed way down and I hit enter again thinking it was my internet being wonky with the snow we are getting.

edit on 30-4-2019 by MaMaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2019 @ 06:32 PM
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Sorry for the duplicate.

edit on 30-4-2019 by MaMaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2019 @ 06:39 PM
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Why would an extratemporal, transdimensional, omniscient and super powerful creator entity need to hide evidence of his/her/its existence in a complicated code buried a small religious book? I guess simply reading the supposed words and deeds of this entity doesn't cut it for some people. But if it's in a crossword puzzle, then it's true!



posted on Apr, 30 2019 @ 09:11 PM
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The only way the secrets of the bible can be decoded is by the Spirit. I'm talking about secrets that reveal how a prophecy will be fulfilled. I don't believe the scriptures hide codes in words just like in the National Treasure movies. The bible code must have been invented by the Masons. They have some interesting books authored by Albert Pike.



posted on Apr, 30 2019 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: info393

My call on this is that the writer of this particular book is trying to interpret ancient texts via modern English phonetic similarities.

It is clutching at straws and finding equivalences where there are none.

The Bible is self explanatory and should remain so in any translation that does not make assumptions and that tries to remain true to the original texts (or to the majority of textual sources which exist).



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

The Bible is a collection of allegories. The veracity being in the story, not the mystery or the history. At the heart, tales of how to be a good human.


Well...the New Testament, anyway. That other one gets pretty dreadful.

edit on 5/1/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 02:54 AM
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originally posted by: Phage

Well...the New Testament, anyway. That other one gets pretty dreadful.


You're not into the deeper archetypal stories of humankind? I don't think there is one old testament story that lacks deep meaning.

Moses exodus demonstrating our persistence to remain in a state of slavery exhibited by pharaoh's stubbornness.
Cain and Abel demonstrating the ideological debate between the agricultural revolution and nomadic herding.
Circumcision to demonstrate the importance of not letting fleshly desires distract you from greater promises.
Daniel demonstrating the ideal way to live among the confusion of Babel-on.
etc, etc, etc.



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: cooperton

Yeah.
And killing people for disobeying their parents.

Groovy.



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 03:32 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: cooperton

Yeah.
And killing people for disobeying their parents.

Groovy.


Surely there was a deep lesson involved that you are ignoring. Why do you fear death, or view it as a tragedy? Whatever gave you life would know when is best for you to shed your cocoon and fly away.
edit on 1-5-2019 by cooperton because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 03:41 AM
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a reply to: cooperton

I don't want to die. Who does? Perhaps when I'm even older and frailer I will. But for now, I enjoy life. My dad was ready and he was certainly not a Christian.

But I don't fear death. It happens to every living thing.
edit on 5/1/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 04:50 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: chr0naut

The Bible is a collection of allegories. The veracity being in the story, not the mystery or the history. At the heart, tales of how to be a good human.


Well...the New Testament, anyway. That other one gets pretty dreadful.


As well as allegories, there are histories, laws, king lists, genealogies, cultural notes, pure fictions, anthropological info, metaphors, philosophy, predictions, national and tribal definitions, language etymology, songs and deep spiritual concepts.

Stacks of stuff. It is a whole collection of writings spanning nearly 3,000 years. Some writers were kings and intellectuals, some were bumpkins. You gotta expect a lot of content.



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 05:12 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

The Golden Rule, rules.

There's a lot of Not Golden Rule in the Bible.


edit on 5/1/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 05:42 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: chr0naut

The Golden Rule, rules.

There's a lot of Not Golden Rule in the Bible.


But the Golden Rule is in there, in a way.

Consider that if I got a stack of news sites and newspapers, I'm fairly sure I could read them all entirely and not find a single moral dictate but I'd find a lot of crime.

Sometimes when we talk of some abstract concepts we have to use language that makes us challenge our assumptions and that makes us muse over the scenarios.

I believe that overall, the Bible has a highly moral and positive slant and the context is the key. Too many people take individual bits, without reference to apparently contradictory parts, as being the full and final interpretation of the Bible.

I find that often when sections seem to conflict that I have made the wrong assumptions about the meaning of something and that the overwhelming majority of writings give clarity to the interpretation of the odd one out.

To merely see the Bible as some confusingly verbose list of do's and dont's misses the majority of what we might learn from it.

Traditional Jewish interpretation is that there are only 114 laws (or thereabouts) in the Old Testament and these 'laws' almost from day one were challenged and a process of adjudication to asses the applicability of the laws was encouraged (by God & Moses, etc.).

In the New Testament, Jesus explained that the foundation of all the laws was summed up in just two: Love God above all else and love your neighbor like you love yourself.

The second of Jesus' laws is very similar in effect to the Golden Rule, only more compassionate, perhaps, and it also has the sophistication of implication that you must, necessarily, also love yourself. The Golden Rule suffers in that some people can be self destructive and suicidal and clearly treating others in the same way is not good.

edit on 1/5/2019 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 10:37 AM
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originally posted by: schuyler
I have two books on the Bible Codes and even the software where you can pull out the codes.

Only problem is it does not work. It's a total fantasy.

The idea of a hidden code in the Bible text is not new. It is a central concept in the Cabala, or traditional Jewish mysticism. According to Cabalistic teachers, the simple meaning of the Bible text is not its true meaning. They believe that God used the individual letters of the Hebrew Bible text as symbols, which when properly understood reveal a greater truth. In their view, each Hebrew letter and its position in the Bible text was set by God with a specific purpose in mind.

According to Jeffrey Satinover, a researcher of the Bible code, these Jewish mystics believe that the Hebrew letters used to record the creation account in Genesis hold incredible mystical power. He writes: “Genesis, in short, is not simply a description; it is the very instrument of the act of creation itself, a blueprint in the mind of God made manifest in physical form.”

A 13th-century Cabalistic rabbi, Bachya ben Asher of Saragossa, Spain, wrote of certain hidden information that was revealed to him by reading every 42nd letter in a portion of Genesis. This method of skipping over letters according to a particular sequence in an attempt to discover hidden messages is the basis for the modern Bible-code concept.

The Dead Sea Scrolls include portions of the Bible text copied over 2,000 years ago. The spelling in these scrolls often differs considerably from later Masoretic texts. In some scrolls, certain letters were freely added to indicate vowel sounds, since vowel points had not yet been invented. In other scrolls, fewer letters were used. A comparison between all extant Biblical manuscripts shows that the meaning of the Bible text remains intact. Yet, it also clearly indicates that the spelling and number of letters vary from text to text.

The search for a supposed hidden message depends upon an absolutely unchanging text. One letter altered would completely distort the sequence​—and the message if there was one. God has preserved his message through the Bible. But he has not preserved each letter intact, as if he were obsessed with such trivial matters as spelling changes over the course of centuries. Does this not indicate that he has not buried a hidden message in the Bible?​—Isaiah 40:8; 1 Peter 1:24, 25.

The apostle Paul very clearly wrote that “all Scripture is inspired of God and beneficial for teaching, for reproving, for setting things straight, for disciplining in righteousness, that the man of God may be fully competent, completely equipped for every good work.” (2 Timothy 3:16, 17) The clear and straightforward message in the Bible is not too difficult to understand or apply, but many people choose to ignore it. (Deuteronomy 30:11-14) The prophecies that are openly presented in the Bible give a solid basis for believing its inspiration. Unlike a hidden code, Bible prophecies are not arbitrary, and they do not ‘spring from any private interpretation.’​—2 Peter 1:19-21.

The apostle Peter wrote that “it was not by following artfully contrived false stories that we acquainted you with the power and presence of our Lord Jesus Christ.” (2 Peter 1:16) The concept of a Bible code has its roots in Jewish mysticism, utilizing “artfully contrived” methods that obscure and distort the plain meaning of the Bible’s inspired text. The Hebrew Scriptures themselves unequivocally condemned such a mystical approach.​—Deuteronomy 13:1-5; 18:9-13.

How useful it is to have the Bible’s clear message and instruction, which can help us to know God. This is far better than trying to learn about our Creator by searching for hidden messages that are the products of private interpretation and computer-assisted imagination.​—Matthew 7:24, 25.



posted on May, 1 2019 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: info393

Sorry to say, but bible code is a load of crap. You can find codes in Moby Dick if you look for them. What a joke. Stop using the word "prove" when you don't even grasp what it means.
edit on 5 1 19 by Barcs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2019 @ 04:43 AM
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Rev 13:18
B.C. 45 Julian calendar took effect. The modern Gregorian calendar begin adoption in 1582. Duration between 45 B.C. and 1 A.D. is 45 years since there is no 0 B.C./A.D.
A.D. 622 someone left Mecca to settle in Medina...the year Muslims considered as beginning of Islam
Duration between 1 A.D. to A.D. 622 is 621 years
45 + 621 = 666



posted on May, 2 2019 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Why would an extratemporal, transdimensional, omniscient and super powerful creator entity need to hide evidence of his/her/its existence in a complicated code buried a small religious book? I guess simply reading the supposed words and deeds of this entity doesn't cut it for some people. But if it's in a crossword puzzle, then it's true!



That is simple. It should be stated clearly.

Because if we FREELY choose to follow the Christ example and attempt to LOVE OUR NEIGHBORS as we love ourselves it is better than if a Hitler uses an Iron rod and Gas Chambers on those who don't.



posted on May, 2 2019 @ 03:29 PM
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I'll keep it real simple then, the first sentence in the book is half a page, half a page can't be too long for anyone to read, what do you think about the first sentence in the book SELF?



posted on May, 2 2019 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: Justoneman
That is simple. It should be stated clearly.

Because if we FREELY choose to follow the Christ example and attempt to LOVE OUR NEIGHBORS as we love ourselves it is better than if a Hitler uses an Iron rod and Gas Chambers on those who don't.

I don't think you're quite getting it. I see the Old Testament as saying that existence is filled with chaos and misery, generally created by the psychopathic God, so you're better off just doing what it says and "going with the flow" until it's over. The New Testament says that this world is only a temporary, horrible illusion created by a demiurge, but we can minimize the misery and pain if we're just kind to each other. (The idea that this can only be done through Jesus is more of a marketing point than anything.)

Most religious texts are about dealing with and hopefully reducing the uncertainty and horror of existence, either by keeping your head low and obeying the rules, or by transcending it. It's not that we can somehow eliminate the misery, because we can't. We can only survive until we die.
edit on 2-5-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)




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