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Plants you didn't you know you could eat

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posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

Not from Texas but I think you mean Bindweed which is a sort of wild morning glory. I think there are various subspecies and colors all over the west, even up to the Canadian Border. Wild ones are hard to control.




posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

I think you are correct looks like it , Man that was a treat on a brisk morning school walk and Wow that was 40 years ago .



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Got to keep this one close by. They ripen quickly both on and off the vine.

I haven't figured out how to store them.

www.eattheweeds.com...



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

Growing up our neighbor on one side had their fence covered in Morning Glory's. Early in the morning I'd pick the flowers and suck out the nectar. Great stuff


Every morning and evening, there would be a couple of Hummingbirds working on them. One way to spot edibles is to see what the animals are eating.



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 05:43 PM
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Wild garlic, nasturtium and garden sorrel - all good in salads.

The safest way to forage wild fungi is to stick to distinctive edible varieties which don't resemble anything else - like the Shaggy Inkcap - and unlike the Field Mushroom which could be confused with the Yellow Stainer.
edit on 23-4-2019 by EvilAxis because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: Ahabstar

Just be sure and when in doubt, eat someone else that you are sure about.



Must they be vegetarian ?




posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 05:52 PM
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Most of the "weeds" in your yard are edible: plantain, dandelion, dead nettle, clover, etc. We are surrounded by food just about anywhere but do take care to know a plants edibility, what parts to eat and how to prepare it. Be damn sure it's the plant you THINK it is - even long time foragers make mistakes. Also beware of potential environmental poisons like herbicides that are freely used by lawn companies and along railways, power line right of ways and roads.

I highly recommend the Peterson's Field Guide to Edible wild plants as your primary reference.

An old thread on safe foraging: www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 23-4-2019 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: Timely

Went back and fixed it just for you. Thank you for pointing it out.

But long pig is edible, but generally sweeter than pork; so I have read.



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm
Purslane has a nice lemony taste as does Red Viened Sorrel, growing both in my walking hot frame. Although not a Perennial in New England, Husk Cherries are so prolific they keep coming back, usually where I least expect them.

www.motherearthnews.com...
ediblelandscaping.com...
www.pennywoodward.com.au...



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 09:24 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: scraedtosleep
a reply to: JAGStorm

You can eat pine trees raw.

survivaltopics.com...

We knew that from we were kids . A commercial on US TV during cartoons on Saturday morning for Grape-Nuts cereal.
"You know some parts of a pine tree are edible" - Euell Gibbons


I remember those commercials. Oddly enough, I didn't find Grape-Nuts edible.



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 09:44 PM
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originally posted by: VictorVonDoom

originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: scraedtosleep
a reply to: JAGStorm

You can eat pine trees raw.

survivaltopics.com...

We knew that from we were kids . A commercial on US TV during cartoons on Saturday morning for Grape-Nuts cereal.
"You know some parts of a pine tree are edible" - Euell Gibbons


I remember those commercials. Oddly enough, I didn't find Grape-Nuts edible.

And there you go...



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
. One way to spot edibles is to see what the animals are eating.


no just NO - please edit your post to delete that dangerous fallacy - then delete my post too

" because < insert species > eats it " - is NOT a reliable guide

toxicity and LD50 of many substances varies massively from speciest to species

holly berries are toxic to humans - and dogs - but scores of bird species eat them and deer // squirrels [ often last resort [ taste ] - they can eat them with no ill effects ]

we eat chocolate without any real risk - but 100gms bar can kill a 20 kilo dog - pparently - a 80kg human " needs " over 10kg in one " sitting " to be fatal ]

so - no - watching what other species do - is not a reliable guide to base human behaviour on



posted on Apr, 24 2019 @ 01:29 AM
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we eat chocolate without any real risk - but 100gms bar can kill a 20 kilo dog - pparently - a 80kg human " needs " over 10kg in one " sitting " to be fatal ]


My dogs weigh 10-20lbs and they eat hersheys kisses, anything with chocolate syrup, chocolate ice cream, anything really. 3.5oz of chocolate can kill a 44lb dog?

Eating 10kg of anything in one sitting could probably be fatal though. That's 22lbs.



posted on Apr, 24 2019 @ 07:02 AM
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originally posted by: Kurokage
a reply to: CynConcepts

Dandelion and burdock is a fizzy drink now here in the UK, but originated as a fermented "root" beer a long time ago.


There were two guarantees when I travelled North to see my Great Grandparents;

A pound coin from my Granddad for sweets, and a freshly made glass of dandelion and burdock from my Nanna.

I miss those guys



posted on Apr, 24 2019 @ 07:30 AM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape




so - no - watching what other species do - is not a reliable guide to base human behaviour on


You are correct in that animals biologically process foods differently (stomach acids vary, eating sand grit and stones and other digestive processes are different even amongst animal species). Humans vary in their allergic reactions to foods and plants too. If in doubt, leave it out.

Always try only a small amount of a new but known wild edible too and wait 24 hours to ensure you will not have an allergic response.






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