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What happened to Tesla's files?

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posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: mike dangerously

Perhaps Tesla's last papers were just crazy crayon drawings of the pigeon and the archivists thought it best not to 'spread the info around'.

"I loved that pigeon as a man loves a woman, and she loved me. As long as I had her, there was a purpose to my life." - Nikola Tesla.




posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut



Ironic that the inventor of HAARP technologies would have such an affinity for homing pigeons.
The patents attributed to Tesla are solid, but of course once the media misquoted and spun the Tesla sales pitches into nonsense there isn't much left for a positive public image.

The time travel meme probably came from classified rainbow Naval research/"Philadelphia experiment".
At 86 you would think he might form an alliance with Grandma Top Gun?



posted on Apr, 23 2019 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: mike dangerously
There was a series on history channel (I think. Could’ve been science) last year that was about this very subject. Not sure if it’s coming back but it was interesting to watch. Some of their speculation seemed a bit stretched. It was an interesting watch though.




posted on Apr, 24 2019 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: Blue Shift

Was there any proof he had any files, much less files of substance?

Tesla wasn't so much a scientist as he was a dabbler. Unlike a scientist, who would come up with a hypothesis and then run multiple tests to see if the hypothesis was verifiable or to clarify a relationship between variables, Tesla was the kind of guy who would build a huge coil and then run electricity through it cranked to "11" just to see what it would do. He liked sparks. And occasionally he discovered something like the transmission of a signal through a radio wave. He is credited with having invented "radio," but never really developed it into anything useful. That was Marconi. Same thing with wireless power transfer. Pump enough electricity into the air and it will light up a fluorescent bulb without wires. You can do that if you go stand by a high tension wire. But again, there was no practical application for it because he didn't think out the underlying physics of it. And who would want to live under a massive grid of high-voltage wires?

Now compare Tesla with a real scientist like James Clerk Maxwell, who worked around the same time. He was meticulous and brilliant, and as a result his equations are the foundation of most of our knowledge and industry of electromagnetics up through quantum mechanics throughout the 20th Century to today.

But Maxwell didn't have the things that would make him a favorite of the disgruntled conspiracist, like an unorthodox research method, wild claims of fantastical futuristic devices, a perceived plot against him by TPTB, and so on, so he doesn't get cars named after him. This one doesn't count:


Jack Benny (here with Eddie "Rochester" Anderson), an American comedian and entertainer from the 20th Century with his vintage Maxwell automobile. The Maxwell was part of a running joke alluding to Benny being so cheap that he didn't want to buy a new car. (For you young folks out there.)
edit on 24-4-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 01:47 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

It takes both theoretical and practical scientists to get things done.
Tesla certainly gets a lot more fame/infamy due to the nature of his later life, however he certainly was a scientist of a high caliber. I mean he designed the first practical AC induction motor, as it didn't require a commutator which made the use of AC power not only cheaper but more efficient due to not having to worry about constant sparks from a DC motor switching the direction of it's current.



posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Nikola Tesla was a lonely, troubled man who had watched his great ideas ripped from his hand by financial moguls all his life, and who died penniless still working on his ideas. The electricity you use to communicate with us, the vehicles you drive to get around, and many other things you and I take for granted are in large part due to his discoveries. To try and demonize him that way after his death, when he cannot defend himself, is purely despicable. You have no shame.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift


Tesla wasn't so much a scientist as he was a dabbler.

I used to think the same thing, although I never presumed to degrade him over that reputation. Then a friend came across a book at a flea market and, knowing my affinity for his work, sent it to me. Inside, I found many of Tesla's actual notes, both in print and in photocopy.

The equations floored me. Nikola Tesla was as much of a scientist as Marconi, Hertz, Newton, Planck, or any of the other names we know so well. He had an intuitive understanding of mathematics and used many of the equations from others you consider "real" scientists to make things work. Many of his theoretical assumptions still require me to sit and study to follow his line of reasoning. In contrast, compared to Tesla, Edison, his major competition at that time, had a poor foundation in mathematics.

To listen to someone who likely has trouble with simple calculus try and disparage his superior comprehension is disconcerting to me, and one of the major reasons I hold humanity in such low esteem. No other creature on this planet will try and destroy another of its own species over self-aggrandization. That includes rattlesnakes, vampire bats, cockroaches, and sewer rats.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 04:38 PM
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The Tesla-Westinghouse hydro electric plant built in 1895, in Niagara Falls was a flawless execution involving very complex engineering issues.


"We have many a monument of past ages; we have the palaces and pyramids, the temples of the Greek and the cathedrals of Christendom. In them is exemplified the power of men, the greatness of nations, the love of art and religious devotion. But the monument at Niagara has something of its own, more in accord with our present thoughts and tendencies. It is a monument worthy of our scientific age, a true monument of enlightenment and of peace. It signifies the subjugation of natural forces to the service of man, the discontinuance of barbarous methods, the relieving of millions from want and suffering"


The flowery speech by Tesla putting his feat in lineage with the Great Pyramids, temples of Rome, and the cathedrals of Christiandom might come off as a little over the top, but who are we to judge there isn't anyone on ATS that could fix a Hyundai much less be first in the world to visualize a cutting edge technology.



posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: chr0naut

Nikola Tesla was a lonely, troubled man who had watched his great ideas ripped from his hand by financial moguls all his life, and who died penniless still working on his ideas. The electricity you use to communicate with us, the vehicles you drive to get around, and many other things you and I take for granted are in large part due to his discoveries. To try and demonize him that way after his death, when he cannot defend himself, is purely despicable. You have no shame.

TheRedneck


Maxwell's equations From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Electrical theory complete (with the exception of photoelectric and relativistic effects) when Tesla was 5 years old.

Of course I have no shame.




posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Well, you found the Wikipedia page. I am unimpressed. Now, can you impress me and read it? What does the del symbol represent? What about "del-dot"? What is a tenser? How do Maxwell's equations relate to a step down transformer?

You think electromagnetic theory is complete? Wow... OK, hot shot, explain to me what magnetic flux is made of.


Of course I have no shame.

Seems you take pride in that fact. That's pretty pitiful... maybe that's why so few others take anything you say seriously.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Well you found the cobalt-iron alloy article in 2019.
Spooky



posted on Apr, 25 2019 @ 10:21 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: chr0naut

Well, you found the Wikipedia page. I am unimpressed. Now, can you impress me and read it? What does the del symbol represent?


I think you mean the Nabla symbol which is an inverted Delta symbol (a point down triangle).

It is used in multidimensional vector mathematics for gradient or can be used as a symbol of the standard derivative in linear mathematics.


What about "del-dot"?


Divergence, again in multi-D vectors.


What is a tenser?


One more than nine, sir.



But a tensor is generally a directional value in a multi dimensional vector graph.


How do Maxwell's equations relate to a step down transformer?


They explain time-variant values in relation to Ohm's law, extending it to explain field variations and issues like hysteresis.


You think electromagnetic theory is complete? Wow... OK, hot shot, explain to me what magnetic flux is made of.


Magnetic flux is a measurement of magnetic field for a particular area. It is made of magnetic flux.



Of course I have no shame.

Seems you take pride in that fact. That's pretty pitiful... maybe that's why so few others take anything you say seriously.

TheRedneck

Maxwell's equations cover more than vector mathematics and were seen as a complete description of electrics well after Tesla, with the exception of Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, and of relativistic effects which would not have been observable by the likes of Tesla or Maxwell.

edit on 25/4/2019 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut


I think you mean the Nabla symbol which is an inverted Delta symbol (a point down triangle).

You would be correct. It is commonly referred to as the "del" operator. Hence the "del-dot" and "del-cross" references, referring to the dot product and cross product of two partial derivative vectors.

The fact that you didn't know the reference to "del" is a good indication that you can find links and parrot information.


Divergence, again in multi-D vectors.

But what does that mean? Anyone can type into a search engine, read the gobbledy-gook therein, and parrot it.


But a tensor is generally a directional value in a multi dimensional vector graph.

Grammar Nazi.


They explain time-variant values in relation to Ohm's law, extending it to explain field variations and issues like hysteresis.

Actually, they define the action of impedance and the transfer of impedance from one coil to the other through magnetic flux variations. But that's a good regurgitation of a web page.


Magnetic flux is a measurement of magnetic field for a particular area. It is made of magnetic flux.

So you believe magnetic flux is made of magnetic flux. And I suppose coffee is made of coffee, right?

No one knows what magnetic flux is made of. We call it flux because flux is techno-speak for "something we haven't figured out yet." That's a direct quote from a retired dual PhD (Electrical Engineering, major in Electromagnetic Field Theory, and Physics) who had retired from NASA and was teaching as an adjunct to pass the time. Damn good instructor.


Maxwell's equations cover more than vector mathematics and were seen as a complete description of electrics well after Tesla, with the exception of Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, and of relativistic effects which would not have been observable by the likes of Tesla or Maxwell.

No.

Maxwell's equations were first published in James Maxwell's paper "On Physical Lines of Force" in 1861. They were consolidated in 1884. Tesla lived from 1856 to 1943. The first publication of Maxwell's equations occurred when Nikola Tesla was 5 years old, and the first consolidation when he was 28.

You are trying to equate the acceptance of the equations as a complete description with publication of the equations. Maxwell's equations were certainly known, at least to those who studied mathematics, long before that. It's a common mistake, especially for those who have no previous knowledge of what they are talking about.

All in all, you did not know that "del" was the common term in mathematics, you answered the wrong question about transformers, you tried a circular argument when asked about magnetic flux, and you completely missed the dates of Maxwell's equations. You fail, sir. See you next semester, and please try to listen to the instructor this time.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
To listen to someone who likely has trouble with simple calculus try and disparage his superior comprehension is disconcerting to me, and one of the major reasons I hold humanity in such low esteem.

It must be sad to live in a world where nobody else matches your genius.



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




Nikola Tesla was a lonely, troubled man who had watched his great ideas ripped from his hand by financial moguls all his life, and who died penniless still working on his ideas.

And the myth continues.



January 2ND, 1934

A settlement was reached with the Westinghouse Corporation that provided Tesla with a consulting rate of $125.00 per month along with the agreement to pay his monthly rent expenses. Upon signing the agreement, Tesla promptly moved to the Hotel New Yorker where he'd live rent free for the rest of his days. The debt owed to Hotel Governor Clinton was never paid.

teslauniverse.com...

About $2,400 in today's dollars, I think, and no rent in some pretty nice digs.

Nothing was "ripped" from him, but he was a better engineer than he was a businessman.

By 1890, just one year before his 35th birthday, Tesla had become a full fledged millionaire. To give some perspective, $1 million in 1890 would be worth a little more than $25 million today.



By tearing up the contract and relinquishing his royalties, Tesla single-handedly saved the Westinghouse Electric company. In return, Westinghouse paid Tesla a $216,000 lump sum for the right to use his AC patents in perpetuity (that’s worth roughly $5.4 million today).

dailyoddsandends.wordpress.com...


edit on 4/26/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: Phage


And the myth continues.

Yes, because people like you keep perpetuating it.

Yes, he was allowed to stay in his hotel, and yes, he got a stipend... because before that he was literally indigent. I don't know if Westinghouse paid him out of pity or out of a concern for their reputation (Tesla was immensely popular even though he didn't seem to realize it).

$2400 a month 'retirement' for someone who developed so many patents that literally changed everything we do today so far as technology... oh, and free rent in a nice hotel. Gee, whiz, what was I thinking? The man should have been grateful his patents went to his benefactors!

That's sarcasm, in case you missed it. A freakin' mechanic makes more than that.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

He was not "allowed to stay in his hotel." When the deal was made to have his rent paid, Tesla moved from the Hotel Clinton. He had moved to the Clinton after being "asked to leave" the Hotel Pennsylvania because of complaints from other tenants about his collection of "flying rats."

No, it wasn't a "retirement." Tesla had no retirement but he did not live in squalor.


The myth is that Tesla was treated badly. He was just a bad businessman (and later, quite wacky). Blew his wealth, surrendered his royalty agreement voluntarily.
edit on 4/26/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I purposely placed ' ' marks around the word retirement because it was and it wasn't... Tesla did nothing for the stipend. He had been a faithful supporter of George Westinghouse, and had made the company untold wealth.

Westinghouse was tricked into giving some of Tesla's patents away to J.P. Morgan at one point. Then later, Westinghouse closed Wardenclyff Tower after Tesla sunk his heart and soul into making his dream of wireless power a reality. Yes, Phage, he was heartbroken and the stipend he received during his later years was nowhere near what he deserved. He was always a bit eccentric, but after Wardenclyff he became much worse. Edison became a household name based on Tesla's patents, while Tesla felt he was becoming an unknown. That would depress anyone.

He was a poor businessman; I'll grant that. He preferred creating to managing. Most of our inventions come from people like that.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 07:39 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




Westinghouse was tricked into giving some of Tesla's patents away to J.P. Morgan at one point.

Which ones? How was he "tricked?" How could Westinghouse give away Tesla's patents?


Edison became a household name based on Tesla's patents
Right. Because Edison had no patents of his own which contributed to his fame.

edit on 4/26/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2019 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Which ones? How was he "tricked?" How could Westinghouse give away Tesla's patents?

In 1893, Westinghouse, with Tesla working for him, won the bid to provide electric lighting for the World's fair. Edison, who was backed by JP Morgan at the time, held the patents on the incandescent light bulb, so Tesla invented an early version of the fluorescent bulb and lit the world's fair that way.

JP Morgan was furious that Westinghouse had won and successfully fulfilled the contract. He was trying to establish a monopoly on electric power (today known as "General Electric") and Westinghouse was the sole large hold-out. So he threatened to sue Westinghouse over the patent rights to the light bulbs used. Tesla held the patent on the new fluorescent bulb, but Morgan had so much more wealth than Westinghouse that Westinghouse could not afford to fight such a lawsuit. He convinced Morgan to drop the lawsuit by signing over Tesla's patents.

Supposedly, the conversation went along the lines of:
Morgan: "I'm suing you for using Edison's patents."
Westinghouse: "Those patents are from Tesla and you know it."
Morgan: "Of course I do. How long do you think you can fight the lawsuit, though?"

Technically, they belonged to Westinghouse, but Westinghouse was also Tesla's benefactor and Tesla believed he would be well rewarded for those patents. He likely would have been until Morgan pulled that stunt.

That's the end of your history lesson, Phage... tutoring services are $20 an hour after the trial. You can find out more by watching an old History Channel documentary called, if memory serves, "The Men Who Built America" (or something along those lines).


Because Edison had no patents of his own which contributed to his fame.

Now you're being facetious... not in the mood tonight. Go read some more web pages.

TheRedneck




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