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My first painting in a decade

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posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 02:19 PM
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The title of this one is Spring Cardinal. Acrylic on canvas. I am a complete novice with painting. While I am pretty proud of what I managed to accomplish, if there are any painters around who would like to impart knowledge I would definitely appreciate it! Specifically, I would like to know how to do backgrounds.

Here was my process: After I made a base sketch of the bird on a piece of branch with pencil, I did a light blue wash over the whole thing and then did the base for the leaves and the bird. From there, I built the leaves up, finished the bird, added some details to the leaves, and then went back over the blue sky with washes of darker blue, purple, orange, and yellow. I wanted it to look streaky and I like the effect, but I would like to do something a bit more refined for my next piece. I tend to paint thickly, so it was kind of a challenge for me to keep the layers relatively thin compared to what I normally do.

Additionally, I have watercolor and oil paints to experiment with, too--so if anyone knows how to use that stuff, that would be great! Things like materials/etc. would be really helpful.

Thank you!
edit on 18-4-2019 by rukia because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: rukia

Oh I love this!


I purchased some acrylic paints and a couple of small canvases. I've never painted before, but what the hell, I'll give it a shot...one of these days.

Thank you for sharing your work with us rukia!



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: rukia

HEYYY... lookin good!


I dont believe the novice part... but it makes it seem like More of an accomplishment that way, so I dont blame you. Human nature and all. (that was just my roundabout way of complimenting you, i Do actually believe you)



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 04:06 PM
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Did you paint the bird first and then add everything later? I’ll give you criticism if you want some. Everything here looks very disconnected from one another. I think that is mainly because your cardinal is for the most part outlined with extreme darks and the background is lacking finer detail mainly in the color contrast department. Did you paint in layers or did you just go for it? Your birds composition is nice but it seems to be the only focus in this piece, perhaps practice drawing around your whole composition instead of just having one focus. Otherwise it appears you have a raw talent that with work you can hone and do more complex and interesting things only you can create. My advice is work around your whole piece and learn about layering and give her a go. I hope I didn’t come off as mean cause I really do like your bird all the other stuff though I don’t like so much.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman

Much appreciafed. I painted a wash followed by the leaves and then I paid the most attention to the bird. I am pretty bad with landscape/scenery so no offense taken! I did layers on the bird and kind of half-arsed the tree. I will definitely take ypur critique to heart so I can improve--thank you!



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: rukia

What kept you from painting for a decade? You obviously have some skill. Thanks for sharing.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 06:43 PM
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I still cant get over the jaw-dropping fact that you havent picked up a brush in a decade.

You must have incredible patience.

That's the impression that I get. That you must have more than average patience in order to be able to paint like this after a 10 year break. *shrug*
edit on 4/18/2019 by 3n19m470 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2019 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: rukia
Most importantly is have fun while doing it!



posted on Apr, 19 2019 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

Well, I painted in high school when I was required to, for AP, but I never took painting class. While I've always admired painters, I don't really know what I am doing. So I guess the answer is I was a bit afraid of taking the first step. That was until my kind friend bought me a cool art kit and my parents got me a couple of canvases to paint on. At that point I just went for it! ^_^ Thank you!



posted on Apr, 19 2019 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: 3n19m470

Thank you very much! I appreciate it. I find artwork to be soothing. I definitely had to be more patient with painting than woth something like a regular drawing. It was quite enjoyable.



posted on Apr, 19 2019 @ 01:13 PM
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Looks great...excellent restart into the medium. For constructive critisisms I can offer the following.

Add more tones and levels, and learn to blend more.

What I mean by that is to add more subtle shading by adding dark and light washes to areas needing shading or highlighting. It will add depth and bring the features forward (or back depending on what you want).

Examples:
Bird - Add darker shading (think 3 levels of dark, neutral, lt. gray) to the edges and under the wing to give a more rounded 3D appearance. Add lighter washes to highlight the hotter areas where the light would catch and reflect such as the bridge of the beak, and center of the chest feathers...and blend the edges out smoothly.

Background foliage - Add darker tones in the leaves to provide a depth of the foliage...skattered as shaded areas would be.

Good luck, and keep painting, regardless of what anyone says, good or bad.






posted on Apr, 20 2019 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Solid advice bro.



posted on May, 12 2019 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Many thanks! I did end up adding some more tones of yellow and purple throughout the piece. I also redid a few things--I have a long way to go and much to learn. It is exciting and I hope to improve!

Thank you for your kind words and advice



posted on May, 13 2019 @ 12:01 AM
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a reply to: rukia

If you are interested in a more abstract process, check out Acrylic Pouring. I've begun that adventuire that past few months, and have posted a few here already.

Check these threads out for more ideas in art if you like.....
Acrylic Pouring!! I am hooked and the muse in me is overwhelming!
My latest artistic piece, Acrylic on Canvas...
Another glimpse of my latest paintings.....



posted on May, 13 2019 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: rukia

Not bad for a beginner and as for using oil paints and watercolour paint, I would suggest you use oil paints first because it allows you greater freedom to experiment, whereas watercolour painting really needs deliberate actions.

Always start with your background. Your piece seems to straddle between abstract and reality, so, hey, if that is your bent or natural style, then go for it. But if you want to end up with a realistic rendition, then perhaps paint your background smaller or non-existent with the main focal point larger, then you don't have to worry so much about the background. For example...



Have fun either way.

You just reminded me I haven't picked up a paint brush, pastel crayon nor drawing pencil in way too long.
edit on 15CDT10America/Chicago031101031 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2019 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

That's a gorgeous painting.I want to paint like that one day! Do you color in the whole background and then sketch over it for the subject? I suppose I don't want to lose my line work so that I can still maintain the integrity of the subject. I heard something about using white charcoal to draw the subject once the background is dry. What method did you use for that background? Absolutely lovely!



posted on May, 16 2019 @ 08:35 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Thank you! I will check out your threads


I'm thinking about sanding my next canvas so I have a smoother surface to work on. Perhaps the paint won't look as thin that way?



posted on May, 17 2019 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: rukia
a reply to: InTheLight

That's a gorgeous painting.I want to paint like that one day! Do you color in the whole background and then sketch over it for the subject? I suppose I don't want to lose my line work so that I can still maintain the integrity of the subject. I heard something about using white charcoal to draw the subject once the background is dry. What method did you use for that background? Absolutely lovely!


That picture is not mine, I took it from the WWW as an example of using a background just to make the focal point pop.

If I am using pastel or acrylic paints, I always start with the background for a general light and shadow and colour scheme, then sketch over it for the subject. But with oil painting I build up light/shadow/colour and the form of the background then build up or sketch with the oil paint, then at the end I add highlighting and fix tonal areas where needed. I still have to teach myself when to stop, sometimes I just don't want to stop because it is so therapeutic and I end up with muddy areas. Good news with oil painting, I can start all over again.
edit on 15CDT09America/Chicago01690931 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Thank you for your advice, InTheLight! I really want to try out oil painting and watercolors. Have you ever used the parchment paper transfer method for acrylics? I was looking up some videos and people seem to like that, but do you sketch in white charcoal or just regular pencil?



posted on Jun, 14 2019 @ 08:21 AM
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originally posted by: rukia
a reply to: InTheLight

Thank you for your advice, InTheLight! I really want to try out oil painting and watercolors. Have you ever used the parchment paper transfer method for acrylics? I was looking up some videos and people seem to like that, but do you sketch in white charcoal or just regular pencil?


I always sketch with sketching pencils and before oil painting I will sketch a rough idea of the scene, then apply the oil paint to establish my colour scheme layout. Do you know how to use sketching pencils to enlarge or decrease the size of the subject you want to paint? Painters in the olden days used their thumb to enlarge/decrease the subject's size onto canvas but the sketching pencils have a black section at the end which serves this purpose and I use it all the time.

Just choosing a colour scheme is a big decision in itself. I have tried to sketch in charcoal and pastel, but I find it very messy but that could be in the way I position my hand too near the canvas.

I have not used the parchment paper method, nor the drip method (putting paint on canvas then maneuvering it to allow gravity move the paint around) because I normally do not do impressionistic pieces, rather more landscapes and natural objects, which one may say is a cross between impressionism and real life. Although, when I was learning watercolour painting I found that the flow of the watered down paint lended itself very well to impressionistic painting.

If your bent is impressionistic art, then maybe watercolour painting is for you. I would just dive in and give it a try.

Anyway, I am still in a painting slump and my creative interests seem to be moving toward hand sewing and embroidery. I am in the design stage of sewing two border curtain panels for my windows perhaps with a macramed overlay.
edit on 16CDT08America/Chicago02280830 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)

edit on 16CDT08America/Chicago02380830 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)




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