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When or if we begin colonization on Mars. Re: Aging

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posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 01:34 PM
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I was thinking about this earlier. I did a little bit of research on the internet and came up empty handed. Anyways, we've all heard about the permanent settlement with the Mars One project. But the two biggest questions I wondered about were:

1. If I'm 227 lbs on Earth, that makes me 85 pounds on Mars. Weight Converter Here. At what age will my skin begin to wrinkle? Theory being based on if I was born on Mars. Because if you think about it, for 40 years I've lived on Earth under Earth's gravitational pull, with Earth's mass. So being born on Mars and living under the lower weight of gravity, how long would it take for your body to begin to wrinkle?

2. How long would you live? I feel like my body would be under less stress, therefore lead to a longer life. Speaking in terms of Earth years. Granted, I'd only be 21 years old on Mars. Your Age on Other Planets

Fun fact: I would've had to have been born in 1870 on Mars to reach the average life expectancy in Earth years.


edit on 11-4-2019 by LSU2018 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-4-2019 by LSU2018 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 01:42 PM
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Reminds me of those born on February 29th. They only have a birthday once every four years. Strangely enough, they age four times faster than everyone else! BTW, "wrinkling" has as much to do with environmental factors. Those who smoke or spend a lot of time in the salt air are a lot more wrinkled than people who don't.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 01:43 PM
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The big question of colonization of the solar system and you question the rate of your skin wrinkling. Cudos for one I have never heard or thought of. Vanity thy name is Earthman.

Seriously though to me the quesiton of when or if is better considered ''why?''. Or better yet, ''really?''.

To me the notion of colonization of Mars or the moon or any of the rest of the system based on current technology and human adaptability seems more a red herring rooted in those older science fiction scenarios that spoke to the growing population problems we have explaining how we will solve it by escaping to other environments to life. From my perpective it is a pipe dream.

Wrinkles? By then we will have ''Astrocream'' to ''smooth away your wrinkly brow''. Special with this offer ''three for the price of two as our wearhouse is emptying fast so act now.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: TerryMcGuire




Wrinkles? By then we will have ''Astrocream'' to ''smooth away your wrinkly brow''. Special with this offer ''three for the price of two as our wearhouse is emptying fast so act now.


They already have cosmetics with nano-particles in them.

"Abrasion by nano", what could go wrong



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Profiteering ingenuity, always one step ahead of the game. Patents pending.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Reminds me of those born on February 29th. They only have a birthday once every four years. Strangely enough, they age four times faster than everyone else! BTW, "wrinkling" has as much to do with environmental factors. Those who smoke or spend a lot of time in the salt air are a lot more wrinkled than people who don't.


Yeah but it's skin that begins to fall as you age, thus causing the wrinkles. Smoking causes your body to age faster, much like the sun beaming down on you all the time.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: TerryMcGuire
The big question of colonization of the solar system and you question the rate of your skin wrinkling. Cudos for one I have never heard or thought of. Vanity thy name is Earthman.

Seriously though to me the quesiton of when or if is better considered ''why?''. Or better yet, ''really?''.

To me the notion of colonization of Mars or the moon or any of the rest of the system based on current technology and human adaptability seems more a red herring rooted in those older science fiction scenarios that spoke to the growing population problems we have explaining how we will solve it by escaping to other environments to life. From my perpective it is a pipe dream.

Wrinkles? By then we will have ''Astrocream'' to ''smooth away your wrinkly brow''. Special with this offer ''three for the price of two as our wearhouse is emptying fast so act now.


Well, I'm not vain, but I couldn't help but ask. This is the first time I've researched the internet for something and couldn't find an answer. I knew someone here could help me. Plus it gets us away from the politics for a few. But really, if you don't have gravity pulling you at like it is now, wouldn't you stay younger looking longer?



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: LSU2018

LSU

I was not directing that at you dude, it was just a quip in general on that topic.
My thoughts on with less gravity helping stay younger looking are maybe but.
We have developed as a species over a couple of million years in this environment here on Earth. Gravity and air and radiation levels and such. All that time has conditioned us to survive in this environment alone. Change those parameters and there is no telling just how it would affect our bodily systems. No proof on my part just a general assumption on the effect of environmental factors on our biology.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: LSU2018

Mars atmosphere does not protect against ultraviolet radiation, which means you would have to always be protected from it or get cancer and lots of wrinkles faster. I think that may be what you are looking for. It would be a life of hiding from the sun.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: TerryMcGuire

I should've included an "lol" with my response, my bad. This is, of course, all hypothetical but I think we'd live longer. Unless someone unseals the doors that have vacuumed the outside air out. If Mars One succeeds, this means children will be born and will grow up in an environment unknown to us, but normal to them.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 02:54 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: LSU2018

Mars atmosphere does not protect against ultraviolet radiation, which means you would have to always be protected from it or get cancer and lots of wrinkles faster. I think that may be what you are looking for. It would be a life of hiding from the sun.


It definitely would. We couldn't live in their atmosphere like we do Earth's, so it would in a sense be like Total Recall. An interesting read.

Colonizing Mars


A Mars Colony Is Coming
Even as the Mars InSight lander begins to gather scientific data from the Red Planet to better inform the potential for human survival there, Earthlings are making plans to colonize Mars. In December 2017, President Donald Trump signed the Space Policy Directive-1, which refocused America’s space program on human exploration. The plan involves returning humans to the moon, establishing a means for traveling to Mars by the 2030s and eventually expanding human presence across the solar system later in the century.

Getting beyond the moon will require advanced rocket propulsion to speed astronauts to their destination. Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems is building the boosters for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket, designed to take humans beyond Earth orbit. In 2020, the rockets will launch an uncrewed Orion spacecraft to the lunar vicinity as part of Exploration Mission-1. The mission will be step one in a series of increasingly complex missions that will work like stepping stones to lead humans into deep space.

Others are shooting for Mars, too. Mars One, a venture launched by Dutch entrepreneur Bas Lansdorp, says they aim to have humans on Mars by 2031.

When Will Humans Terraform Mars?
A hundred years from now, humans may be thriving on Mars. But they’ll likely be conducting their lives under the confines of a transparent dome akin to a large terrarium. Climate, temperature and atmosphere will be controlled, and humans will be able to grow plants for food. Terraforming Mars — that is, manipulating the atmosphere to create an Earth-like, habitable environment — is simply not possible using any of the technology available to humans, according to NASA. Scientists have proposed large-scale geo-engineering projects, such as releasing carbon dioxide trapped in the Martian soil to create a thicker atmosphere that warms the planet. But recent studies have shown that there isn’t enough CO2 in the soil. The atmospheric pressure on Mars is also less than 1 percent of that on Earth. If, somehow, scientists could figure out how to warm the skies and get them to rain, the water would evaporate quickly.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:08 PM
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I would think increased levels of cosmic radiation would lead to accelerated wrinkling.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:39 PM
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not only cosmic radiation but your body has also evolved to live on a planet with gravity. Sort of like those fish that live in the super pressurized depths of the ocean dies when brought close to the surface. You lose muscle mass and your bones get brittle in a weightless environment you have to exercise regularly. Id imagine after an extended stay on Mars, you wouldn't just be able to return to earth without health repercussions. Some theories that an extended stay might weaken your heart along with other muscles to the point of no return.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:47 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
I would think increased levels of cosmic radiation would lead to accelerated wrinkling.


Cancer would kill them first. The third crop to be cultivated on Mars better be Cannabis after grains and beans or other high oxygen producing plants.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:49 PM
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People are going to age hard, get cancers like crazy, and be buried in that dry dirt forever.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: LSU2018

originally posted by: schuyler
Reminds me of those born on February 29th. They only have a birthday once every four years. Strangely enough, they age four times faster than everyone else! BTW, "wrinkling" has as much to do with environmental factors. Those who smoke or spend a lot of time in the salt air are a lot more wrinkled than people who don't.


Yeah but it's skin that begins to fall as you age, thus causing the wrinkles. Smoking causes your body to age faster, much like the sun beaming down on you all the time.


Whatever, dude, but it seems like a strange thing to obsess over when so many other factors have a lot more to do with your survival. I mean, what kind of deodorant would work best on Mars? And how would Martian sunlight affect fashion designs? So many burning questions!



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: watchitburn

If we lived there, we wouldn't be exposed to it. We'd be in domes our entire life.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 04:06 PM
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a reply to: putnam6

The Mars One project is a permanent settlement. If we go by that, children will be born on Mars so they will grow up in that environment.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: LSU2018

originally posted by: schuyler
Reminds me of those born on February 29th. They only have a birthday once every four years. Strangely enough, they age four times faster than everyone else! BTW, "wrinkling" has as much to do with environmental factors. Those who smoke or spend a lot of time in the salt air are a lot more wrinkled than people who don't.


Yeah but it's skin that begins to fall as you age, thus causing the wrinkles. Smoking causes your body to age faster, much like the sun beaming down on you all the time.


Whatever, dude, but it seems like a strange thing to obsess over when so many other factors have a lot more to do with your survival. I mean, what kind of deodorant would work best on Mars? And how would Martian sunlight affect fashion designs? So many burning questions!


I don't know, lol. Maybe I was being misinterpreting in my OP. The essence of my question was basically this: On a planet with less gravity, would it take longer to cause wrinkles and aging. I was trying to throw some other stuff in there to make it a little more interesting. I figured it would make for a good conversation and pull us away from politics for a few.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 05:03 PM
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originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: watchitburn

If we lived there, we wouldn't be exposed to it. We'd be in domes our entire life.

On the plus side, no mosquitoes.




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