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What are the biggest mistakes cooking?

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posted on Apr, 10 2019 @ 09:01 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: BrianFlanders

Oh, I don't know, cleaning cast iron isn't any harder really than cleaning any other kind of pot once you learn the tricks of how to do it. I usually just boil some water in mine and use a nylon brush to get the crusty stuff off, then wash them out as normal. I'm referring to non-enameled seasoned cast iron here. Enameled you can just soak the insides with water and clean as usual.

The real trick with raw cast iron is getting it seasoned properly to start with. Once you've got a good patina on the cast iron it makes cooking and clean up a snap.



I'd rather just get stainless. It's not gonna rust if you leave it sitting in water for days and you can always take a brillo pad or something to it if you need to without doing too much damage. I'm lazy and I can't cook that well anyway.




posted on Apr, 10 2019 @ 09:26 AM
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Another big mistake people make (IMO) is, buying pots & pans "sets". I don't think I've ever seen a "set" which one pot or other didn't have some serious design flaw. I don't think there is a 'do-everything' set of pots and pans out there, which is why we generally buy specific cookware for specific types of cooking. One brand will have a great pan for making crepes, while another brand will have a better pot for making sauces. Form follows function in this case. I don't really care too much what they look like hanging on the pot rack. What they look like is they mean business, which is all that counts.



posted on Apr, 10 2019 @ 10:05 AM
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Using dull knives. Not only does it make chopping your ingredients harder, it is dangerous. If your knife can't cut through a tomato or pepper without leaving the pieces attached, they are too dull. Sharpen them if you know how or get them done by someone who does.

Not being prepared. Don't try to cook on the fly if you aren't comfortable doing it. Even if you are, it still leads to poor results more often than not.

Use fresh ingredients and local if you can. The farther the ingredient has to travel, the more they need to do it to make it look normal. Buy from markets and butchers etc... Some of us can't always get fresh and local because of our geography but when it's available, do it. The difference in taste is demonstrable.

Don't use salted butter unless you don't have a choice. Unsalted butter is just better for your dishes. Oh and don't substitute margarine for butter unless you don't have a choice.



posted on Apr, 10 2019 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

We forgot to mention rendered fats, and reserved bacon-grease!

Have you ever used/made tallow from your cattle?



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

The biggest mistake is................ Working in a restaurant cooking for ungrateful people.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 09:21 AM
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Some of my favorite pots and pans I have came from the Goodwill store.
I have found vintage cooking utensils still in great shape as well.I have
one large pot I use for cooking my jams and jellies for canning.My skillets
are stainless steel and cast iron.I do have a couple of those copper pans
my husband bought off from a TV ad.I only like them for frying eggs and
frozen fish patties.
As I mentioned,I do have cast iron cookware.I am getting older now and
they are getting to be too heavy for me to use.I will probably let my children
have them.

edit on 11-4-2019 by mamabeth because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: mamabeth
Some of my favorite pots and pans I have came from the Goodwill store.
I have found vintage cooking utensils still in great shape as well.I have
one large pot I use for cooking my jams and jellies for canning.My skillets
are stainless steel and cast iron.I do have a couple of those copper pans
my husband bought off from a TV ad.I only like them for frying eggs and
frozen fish patties.
As I mentioned,I do have cast iron cookware.I am getting older now and
they are getting to be too heavy for me to use.I will probably let my children
have them.


I just found some lovely porcelain pie and tart plates for baking and ceramic French onion oven bowls at a second hand store and they were very inexpensive. I also just started reusing my old cast iron pan but it seems to retain more heat, so I had to relearn how to use it. I washed it, but I think will just keep it oiled from now on.

Here is a tip for cutting onions without crying.



Also to add savory umami taste to any dish use mushrooms, tomato paste, anchovies, or soya sauce. It's amazing the taste difference these ingredients add.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

That has got to be one of the worst and most dangerous ways I've ever seen anyone cut an onion. He wasn't even using the proper knife.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:01 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight

That has got to be one of the worst and most dangerous ways I've ever seen anyone cut an onion. He wasn't even using the proper knife.

I don't cry when I cut onions. I run over them with the lawn mower, you just have to make sure and go fast. The cats hate t hold the onions for me when I cut them though.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy


Your cat-mowing method is safer than that guy's.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:07 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: butcherguy


Your cat-mowing method is safer than that guy's.

Safer for me!
Sometimes I get sticky from the duct tape (helps the cats hold the onions.)



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:16 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight

That has got to be one of the worst and most dangerous ways I've ever seen anyone cut an onion. He wasn't even using the proper knife.


What do you mean? When he cored it? I don't know about you but that is exactly how I have been coring veggies for the last 30 years and I have never cut myself because the key is to take it really slow.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
What do you mean? When he cored it?


Putting that part aside for uselessness of the process I was referring to him using a serrated knife to cut an onion.

This is the proper way:




posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

The only time I use a serrated knife is when I am at a steak house.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy


One of the few places it's called for. I use one on bread and dried meats as well.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight
What do you mean? When he cored it?


Putting that part aside for uselessness of the process I was referring to him using a serrated knife to cut an onion.

This is the proper way:



One man's way of cutting an onion is another man's other way. One person's mistake is another person's successful technique. Some can do it while others can't.




posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
One man's way of cutting an onion is another man's other way.


Actually, in this case there is a very clear right way and a very clear wrong way .The guy with the multiple Michelin stars and trained culinary background is doing it the right way, serrated knife guy, not so much.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:58 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight
One man's way of cutting an onion is another man's other way.


Actually, in this case there is a very clear right way and a very clear wrong way .The guy with the multiple Michelin stars and trained culinary background is doing it the right way, serrated knife guy, not so much.


Well, it probably works for him, but sure if you are trying to instruct people here then go for it.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight


It doesn't just 'work for him', it works for every trained chef on the planet.



posted on Apr, 11 2019 @ 04:04 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight


It doesn't just 'work for him', it works for every trained chef on the planet.


Well, I've been doing that way for 30 years and it works for me too.




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