It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Antarctica is geting colder

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 2 2005 @ 01:14 AM
link   
i am in the process of geting some links on, but does any one else know that antartica is actually getting colder? the trend of melting ice is reversing, and the west antartic ice is getting thicker at the rate of 26.8 gigatons per year, and most of antactica experiaces a longer ice season that 1979, being 21 days longer now




posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 06:00 PM
link   
I'm not aware of any sources for this, but did you get those links you mentioned?



posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 06:16 PM
link   
According to 2004 data, ice melt is increasing at a rapid pace. Where the hell are you getting your information tiddly? It has been increasing for quite some time. The ice melt is reported at least, if it's actually getting colder a whole lot of scientists are lying...

The northeastern tip of antarctica has risen in temperature, in the last 50 years, between 3.6 and 7.2 degrees F. 1200 cubic miles worth of ice named Larsen B slid into the ocean and will melt now, because of it. A similar process is happening on the western tip. If that shelf collapses and melts, sea levels will rise an estimated 16 feet.

According to Quiang Fu from the University of Washington a cooling in the upper aptmosphere concealed from detection a large warming of the lower aptmosphere.

According to reasonable estimates by a European team of researchers, we have another 15k years before the ice starts growing again. Until then it's all melt...



posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 06:26 PM
link   
I have no idea what to believe now.....if you guys could present both sides then maybe I will be able to know the truth.



posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 06:27 PM
link   
In 2002 a 650 feet thick and 1,250 square mile ice shelf fell off of the Antartic cap. It sounds strange to me that would happen if things are getting colder down there.

I am really interested in seeing those links tiddly54.



posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 07:20 PM
link   
It would be nice to get a link to the story, seeing that all i ever hear is of melting ice.

Please provide the link. Thank you



posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 08:38 PM
link   
I looked and looked, and found no evidence we're approaching an increase in ice levels, or a decrease in immediate temperatures. The upper aptmosphere was getting cooler for a while, but the lower aptmosphere was heating up in greater measure. The result is the imbalance we're seeing right now (and well into the future).

Once Larsen B slid into the ocean, several landlocked glaciers starting sliding rapidly towards the ocean. Who knows how much the sea levels will rise when those and the Larsen B shelf melt completely. Perhaps an inch or three, not much in all likelyhood. Still, it is mentionable, and appears to be a very serious warning of more melting action to come. I think we would be better off prepared than drowned. Then again, I'm silly like that.



posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 08:40 PM
link   
My life jacket is on. Thanks for the update.



posted on Mar, 3 2005 @ 09:03 PM
link   
Space is getting close to Earth and we can expect a lot more water to drop from the skies as the temperature lowers around the globe.


E_T

posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 01:30 AM
link   

Originally posted by WyrdeOne
I looked and looked, and found no evidence we're approaching an increase in ice levels, or a decrease in immediate temperatures. The upper aptmosphere was getting cooler for a while, but the lower aptmosphere was heating up in greater measure. The result is the imbalance we're seeing right now (and well into the future).
Yep... and upper atmosphere cooling is connected to ozone depletion.


The first signs of ozone loss have now been observed in the Arctic this winter, and large scale losses are expected to occur if the cold conditions persist. Overall temperatures in the ozone layer are the lowest for 50 years having been consistently low for the past two months.

Since late November large areas of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) - clouds in the ozone layer - have been present over the Arctic region at altitudes around 20 kilometres. They are now the largest in the last 20 years, the period when the ozone-depleting compounds have been high. These conditions could make ozone depletion very likely.

The chemical balance in the stratosphere is changed significantly by the presence of these clouds, altering the breakdown products from CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) so that rapid chemical ozone destruction can occur in the presence of sunlight. If the Arctic stratosphere remains cold during February and March, large ozone loss is expected to take place as sunlight returns to northern latitudes. This could lead to increased levels of ultraviolet radiation in inhabited areas in the northern part of Europe.
www.admin.cam.ac.uk...



posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 01:35 AM
link   
The ice in parts of Antarctica is so thick that warming caused thousands of years ago with the end of the last ice age may just be beginning to affect the bottoms of glaciers, causing them to flow faster. Recent surface temperature fluctuations may have little to do with the breakup of some ancient glaciers.



posted on Mar, 4 2005 @ 06:56 AM
link   

Originally posted by tiddly54
i am in the process of geting some links on, but does any one else know that antartica is actually getting colder? the trend of melting ice is reversing, and the west antartic ice is getting thicker at the rate of 26.8 gigatons per year, and most of antactica experiaces a longer ice season that 1979, being 21 days longer now



It is getting colder as we speak because it is going into winter there. I have been watching the weather there for a couple of months now, and have spoken to our local meteorologist. During their summer, most of Antarctica was experiencing 40 degree weather and rain. Not snow, rain. Our meteorologist said that no that is not normal for Antarctica. In their summer it is still not supposed to get above freezing. Not to mention it is the driest continent on earth and for it to have rain a couple times a week was more than odd.



posted on Mar, 12 2005 @ 10:54 PM
link   
sorry about not getting the links i forgot and got lazy
the melting and rising temp and glaciers breaking off you speak off are on the peninsula, which only accounts for about 2 per cent off all antarticas area. i will post the link on monday night, australian time
you need a member ship to go into the site, its like a journal or something that is also a magazine about science



posted on Mar, 16 2005 @ 09:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by tiddly54
sorry about not getting the links i forgot and got lazy
the melting and rising temp and glaciers breaking off you speak off are on the peninsula, which only accounts for about 2 per cent off all antarticas area. i will post the link on monday night, australian time
you need a member ship to go into the site, its like a journal or something that is also a magazine about science


It's now almost Thursday


Got any links? I'm really curious about this.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 04:17 PM
link   
You said you were too lazy, well then why aren't you posting the links now? Seems you're somewhat lazy right now. Where are the links?



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 01:09 AM
link   
Numerous journal articles state conclusively that Antartica, contrary to popular opinion and persistent media coverage is experiencing cooling and ice thickening. Data shows a relatively small portion, arround 2% of the continent, is melting an calving off those large ice-bergs. This area is called the Antartic Peninsula. I cannot provide you with the specific links tiddly is refering to(other than some of the journal sites which you have to pay for), but I can give you some of the journal references. You are free to visit a library to research these journal references on your own. However, I will provide you with a link for GISS data sets on average surface temperature. A couple notes on the data sets. These are the NASA compiled data sets(the full global one is used frequently to support Global Warming) and I would suggest looking at the largest timeframes possible.

www.giss.nasa.gov...
www.giss.nasa.gov...
This is for the closest city to Antarctica with the most complete temperature record.
www.giss.nasa.gov...
A reporting station on Antarctica

2002, "Antarctic climate cooling and terrestrial ecosystem response,"
Nature 415: 517-20

2000, "Variability and trends in Anarctic surface temperatures from in situ and satellite infrared measurements," Journal of Climate 13: 1674-96.

2002, "Positive mass balance off the Ross Ice Streams, West Antarctica," Science 295: 476-80.

2002, "Interpretation of recent Southern Hemisphere climate change," Science 296: 895-99.

1999, "Climate and atmospheric history of the past 420,000 years from the Vostok ice core, Antarctica," Nature 399: 429-36.

1999, "Radiocarbon constraints on ice sheet advance and retreat in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica," Geology 27: 179-82.

2004, "Interpretation of recent Antarctic sea ice variability," Geophysical Research Letters 31: 10.1029/2003 GLO18732

2003, "On the secular trends in sea ice extent over the antarctic region based on OCEANSAT-1 MSMR observations," International Journal of Remote Sensing 24: 2277-87.

2002, "Trends in the length of the southern Ocean sea-ice season, 1979-99," Annals of Glacialogy 34: 435-40.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 06:09 AM
link   
reply to post by PDTwitch
 


I can see the publication that you are quoting here: Michael Crichton's 'State of Fear', page 229!

All the references are genuine though.

Good book, but it is a novel!



posted on Oct, 16 2009 @ 05:47 AM
link   
www.gsfc.nasa.gov...

necroposted....

someone might stumble upon this thread and appreciate the link above.



posted on Mar, 4 2010 @ 04:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Long Lance
 


And here is another.



posted on Mar, 4 2010 @ 04:25 PM
link   
I'm not going to dismis this out of hand. It wouldn't surprise me. I don't think anyone REALLY knows what the hell is going on with the climate. However, I would like to see some links.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join