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Can Congress force Trump to hand over taxes ?

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posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 03:57 PM
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Its my understanding that we have certain rights as taxpayers. The right to privacy and the right to confidentiality state that taxpayers have the right to expect that any information will not be disclosed unless authorized by the taxpayer or by law. I guess a better question would be is if there is a law that states that a sitting president of the United States, if subpoenaed has to hand over his/her taxes? Can the IRS be subpoenaed and if so under what context?




posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:28 PM
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Unless you are saying that he broke tax law under Obama and the Obama IRS let him slide.

If there is no crime it’s none of my business to see anyone’s tax returns


+1 more 
posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:36 PM
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Can Congress force Trump to hand over taxes ?


Nope.
Sorry liberals

-Chris



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:38 PM
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Congress is not asking trump for his taxes. They are asking the IRS for them.



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: Christosterone

Yes they can. Now lets see if the IRS complies. Some think that trump may have said something to them about not releasing them but if he did he is in trouble again.


+24 more 
posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:42 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
Congress is not asking trump for his taxes. They are asking the IRS for them.



I haven't heard that one yet. Oh wait, yes I have.

They are asking the IRS to break disclosure laws for political purposes.



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: Tartuffe

Pretty sure Nadler knows what he can and cannot ask for and I'm also pretty sure that he is fully within the law to do so.


+5 more 
posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:54 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Tartuffe

Pretty sure Nadler knows what he can and cannot ask for and I'm also pretty sure that he is fully within the law to do so.


Sounds like you like NSA type logic. If you CAN get to it, you should. If he hasn't committed tax fraud or tax crime (the IRS clearly knows his tax status), what stance do you have that an american should be forced to disclose their taxes (i.e. what circumstances?)


+1 more 
posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 04:57 PM
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Trump said he emailed em to Hillary. This email somehow got lost or something I dunno.


+20 more 
posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Tartuffe

Pretty sure Nadler knows what he can and cannot ask for and I'm also pretty sure that he is fully within the law to do so.


Lol.

Nadler couldn't find his @$$ with both hands and a map.

You were certain Trump was going down from Mueller too. I'm 'pretty sure' you have a very tenuous grasp of reality.




edit on 4/5/19 by Ksihkehe because: Typo



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:02 PM
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originally posted by: Tartuffe

originally posted by: Sillyolme
Congress is not asking trump for his taxes. They are asking the IRS for them.



I haven't heard that one yet. Oh wait, yes I have.

They are asking the IRS to break disclosure laws for political purposes.

Please cite the "disclosure laws" you are referring to. Because there is a law saying that the IRS must disclose upon a congressional committee request. Thanks.


+6 more 
posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:10 PM
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originally posted by: F4guy

originally posted by: Tartuffe

originally posted by: Sillyolme
Congress is not asking trump for his taxes. They are asking the IRS for them.



I haven't heard that one yet. Oh wait, yes I have.

They are asking the IRS to break disclosure laws for political purposes.

Please cite the "disclosure laws" you are referring to. Because there is a law saying that the IRS must disclose upon a congressional committee request. Thanks.


Quote the law please, because if it is the one I am thinking of it deals with the Senate and only in executive session.

Thanks in advance....




posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

That's the law. They are not asking for copies to send to the NY Times. They want them in closed session.
They will probably get them.



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:18 PM
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a reply to: Halfswede

Its the law. I didn't write it.



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:18 PM
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a reply to: Ksihkehe

Lets see if he can find those tax returns though.


+2 more 
posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:31 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Halfswede

Its the law. I didn't write it.


But can you actually cite the "law" ?

😎



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

Why?



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: xuenchen

Why?


Why Not? 🎍



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: F4guy




26 U.S. Code § 6103. Confidentiality and disclosure of returns and return information

(a) General ruleReturns and return information shall be confidential, and except as authorized by this title—

(1) no officer or employee of the United States,

(2) no officer or employee of any State, any local law enforcement agency receiving information under subsection (i)(1)(C) or (7)(A), any local child support enforcement agency, or any local agency administering a program listed in subsection (l)(7)(D) who has or had access to returns or return information under this section or section 6104(c), and

(3) no other person (or officer or employee thereof) who has or had access to returns or return information under subsection (e)(1)(D)(iii), subsection (k)(10), paragraph (6), (10), (12), (16), (19), (20), or (21) of subsection (l), paragraph (2) or (4)(B) of subsection (m), or subsection (n),
shall disclose any return or return information obtained by him in any manner in connection with his service as such an officer or an employee or otherwise or under the provisions of this section. For purposes of this subsection, the term “officer or employee” includes a former officer or employee.



www.law.cornell.edu...




Disclosure Laws

You are probably aware that the law protects your tax return information from disclosure to other parties by the Internal Revenue Service. IRC Section 6103 generally prohibits the release of tax information by an IRS employee. However, there are important exceptions that you should be aware of.

IRC 6103(d) provides that return information may be shared with state agencies responsible for tax administration. The state agency must request this information in writing, and the request must be signed by an official designated to request tax information.

IRC 6103(i)(1) provides that, pursuant to court order, return information may be shared with law enforcement agencies for investigation and prosecution of non-tax criminal laws.

IRC 6103(k)(6) allows the IRS to make limited disclosures of return information in the course of official tax administration investigations to third parties if necessary to obtain information that is not otherwise reasonably available.

IRC 6103(l)(1) provides that return information related to taxes imposed under chapters 2, 21, and 24 may be disclosed to the Social Security Administration (SSA) as needed to carry out its responsibilities under the Social Security Act. Chapter 2 relates to self-employment income and does not normally concern employers. Chapter 21 concerns social security and Medicare (FICA) tax, and chapter 24 deals with income tax withholding.

The IRS may therefore share information with SSA about social security and Medicare tax liability if necessary to establish the taxpayer’s liability. This provision does not allow the IRS to disclose your tax information to SSA for any other reason. SSA employees who receive this information are bound by the same confidentiality rules as IRS employees. Therefore, they generally cannot disclose the information to a state social security administrator (SSSA), state officials or other Federal agencies.

IRC 6103(e)(6) and (c) provide for disclosures to powers of attorney and other designees. If you are notified of an audit by the IRS, you may want to have someone other than the authorized officer of your entity represent you or participate in the meeting. You may bring any individual you wish into the discussion, in person or by telephone. You may give oral consent to speak with a third party if necessary to resolve a Federal tax matter. However, oral consent does not substitute for a power of attorney or a legal designation, and the discussion is limited to the issue for which the consent is given. To officially establish a legal representative, you must provide consent using one of the following forms:



www.irs.gov...

You're welcome.
edit on 5-4-2019 by Tartuffe because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 05:58 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Ksihkehe

Lets see if he can find those tax returns though.


Like to see if your messiah Al Sharpton pays his tax debt. Now that would be something.




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