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Boston Dynamics’ latest robot is a mechanical ostrich that loads pallets

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posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Both sides of that coin have proven to impress and disappoint.

Can humans make any sort of device capable of communicating long distances without disruption or outside munipulation?

I doubt it.




posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 01:48 AM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker

Yep. If humans make it, humans can hack it. Probly.

Until quantum computing actually starts to work. That would make it really, really tough to do.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 07:55 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

When AI and robots have taken over 70% of jobs Yang and others have proposed a UBI so that those without work will be able to afford make a meagre living.

However there are many people very much against the idea of a UBI. For those of you who have never been unemployed it’s about more than just money, it’s also about feeling like your needed in society, about providing for your family if you’re lucky enough to have one. It’s about not feeling completely worthless. It’s about being gifted as birthright like all animals, the means to provide for yourself. When that is taken away from you, so is your liberty, freedom and pride.

A large portion of society, is feeling increasingly unwanted, excluded and outright rejected. Struggling just to make ends meat is one thing, but having no means just to scrape by is another.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 07:59 AM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars

originally posted by: Assassin82

originally posted by: conspiracy nut
I give it twenty years before most jobs as we know it are run by some sort of machine, robot or automation. There will be many jobs involved with the sale, maintenance and programming of them but I don't think that will be enough to fill the void.


Most experts (MIT, Yale, Government think tanks) have 70 % of American jobs either automated or in the process of being automated by 2030. Coming sooner than we think.

Listen to Andrew Yang on Joe Rogans podcast...he cites some interesting research and has a solution. Whether it’s the right solution or not remains to be seen. But he’s the only one talking about it at the political level.


Thanks for the info, I will try to give it a listen later. Can you share a brief description of his solution?



Sure. Many won’t like it because it’s socialistic in nature. But the design behind it may bring it a great deal of merit. His solutions starts with $1,000 universal basic income for anyone in the US who wants it. It’s not designed to provide a full income, and it would negate access to some other social programs. His intended purpose with that is to give people something to land on when their jobs become obsolete to automation.

He references the economic depression that hit the Midwest when thousands of manufacturing jobs went overseas and came back heavily automated. Some of those people went on to different careers like truck driving. Others didn’t have the skill set to find another meaningful job and others were just completely out of luck as there weren’t enough jobs in the area. This led to a rise in suicide and a lingering drug problem in the area. Even today, heroin use in the Midwest can be linked to this in some ways.

Now imagine that, but on a national scale and affecting tens of millions of people. Truck drivers, servers, fast food workers, bank tellers, taxi drivers....all of these very well could be automated in 10 years time. You’ll have this HUGE influx in people looking for work in fields they don’t have the training or experience to work in. Even college educated people will have a hard time competing for employment. So the universal basic income would, theoretically, help soften that economic blow. It would at least give people something to help them survive.

Of course from there he puts an emphasis on free education for trade skills that will never go away. A machine could never be a plumber or a mechanic. (Not yet anyway). And they’re jobs that are learnable to many people. I believe he mentioned putting a tax on employers who would use automation to help pay for free education but don’t quote me on that. He mentioned other ways he would pay for all this without it disrupting our political dynamics but I don’t recall the specifics of it.

I typically steer clear of social programs like this, but he seems to have done his homework. There is a bit of common sense and forethought applied to it.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 08:23 AM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

A great number of people between the ages
of 18 to 65 who want to work are excluded
from the job market because of illness or
lack of motivation and rely on disability, donations from family and strangers
and selling food stamps to get some cash.

It can become a desperate situation when
all that of one's income is gone and there
is no support network. 100 s of
thousands if not millions are homeless.
Millions do have a higher education and
it is disregarded because they're not
working. The other millions may
achieve more as there are more
low wage and labor intensive jobs.

It is desireable people work after
high school but many do not go
to high school and become a burden
on society. In smaller BMI
populations, it is easier to
segregate them into can work,
can't work and won't work. Job
opportunities could be given
to people willing and able to
work before payment of a
BMI.

Disability is for those that
can't work because if a
physical problem. If you
don't want to work a BMI
should be paid.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 08:26 AM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

A great number of people between the ages
of 18 to 65 who want to work are excluded
from the job market because of illness or
lack of motivation and rely on disability, donations from family and strangers
and selling food stamps to get some cash.

It can become a desperate situation when
all that of one's income is gone and there
is no support network. 100 s of
thousands if not millions are homeless.
Millions do have a higher education and
it is disregarded because they're not
working. The other millions may
achieve more as there are more
low wage and labor intensive jobs.

It is desireable people work after
high school but many do not go
to high school and become a burden
on society. In smaller BMI
populations, it is easier to
segregate them into can work,
can't work and won't work. Job
opportunities could be given
to people willing and able to
work before payment of a
BMI.

Disability is for those that
can't work because if a
physical problem if qualify, else
can't work no disability payment.
If you don't want to work a BMI
should be paid.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 08:36 AM
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The micromachines are so efficient,
moving along a DNA strand, there are
So few parts:

Molecular Machines



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 08:37 AM
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lot of people been trying to tell you guys automation is about to take off

oh well I'll wait for the poor unskilled losers to take your crap via force LOL



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 08:57 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Our company just bought 3 of these.
.

We named them Curly Larry and Moe
I just received my first lesson on them this past week. Fun times ahead. Oh, and people don't like them because they are taking jobs but yet they complain about their job.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: ThatDidHappen

I’ve no idea what you’re talking about, are you saying those that can but don’t want work should or shouldn’t be paid BMI?

What about those that can and want to work but can’t find any because there simply isn’t any available?



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: Tarzan the apeman.

Work wouldn’t be work if it was something fun everyone wanted to do in their free time. How would you feel if your means of earning a living is taken away by Curly Larry or Moe?



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:09 AM
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a reply to: Assassin82




... Of course from there he puts an emphasis on free education for trade skills that will never go away. A machine could never be a plumber or a mechanic. (Not yet anyway).


That's not how it will happen though. Mankind has a fundamental misunderstanding about automation, and he constantly demonstrates it.

While all these propeller heads are out trying to one-up each other with cooler automation, something else is happening which people fail to notice. As manufacturers and producers continue to shove automation down everyone's throats the world around everyone changes, but rather than take notice they just blindly accept it. So what is this big evil? Well, mankind winds up working for the automation, not the automation working for him.

We see it already. When was the last time you did a tuneup on your car? When was the last time you took your TV in for repair? In the case of the tuneup on your car, the average person can't work on a modern (computer-everything) car. In the case of your TV, the TV repairman is extinct and you just go buy another one. We live in a throw away society.

We use more electricity per person than ever before, practically everything needs to be plugged in. Many people today can't even get out of bed without some electronic gadget. Millions can't work without an electronic gadget. 85% of Americans would have a complete meltdown if they didn't have their cell phone. Machines and automation own us, we don't own them.

When AI and automation eliminate the jobs, then the only jobs will be making automation...for a while. Enter AI, pretty soon that automation will learn how to make better automation all by itself. Then what?

Oh, and those plumbers and mechanics, they'll get replaced too, and here's how...

Over time they'll start building everything in modular pieces. They're doing it already. Houses, buildings and cars will all be built in modules. Square, boring, high density modules. Just like your TV, nothing will get repaired, it will just get replaced. Life will be just like the video in the OP, a boring warehouse full of a bunch of evenly sized square boxes stacked on a pallet. Curves will be replaced with squares, terrain will be shunned for ultra-high density flat spots. Unpredictable will be replaced by predictable. Food will all be made from genetically modified tofu made from soy beans farmed in an ultra-high density hydroponic growing facility with precise artificial lighting and automated harvesters. Choice will be lost. Oh sure, you can still get the red kind with Red #6 dye in it, or Yellow #3 dye.

What other things are curved, and unpredictable, and fallible? Humans?

We will be owned by the automation we have created. And then we will be consumed by it.
With no people there will be no need for buildings, and cars, and food or any products. And all those automated machines will sit idle.

Then there will be silence. There won't be anyone around to worry about global warming, or solar arrays or self-driving cars, there won't be anyone for Alexa to call; there will just be silence.

With automation, we are making ourselves obsolete.

So I guess there really was some truth in the saying...He who dies with the most money (and toys) wins.


edit on 3/30/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

I realize work isn't fun all the time. But it is what you make it. If people are going to pizz and moan about their job and aren't happy then find another job. Why should I have to live in another person's misery?



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:22 AM
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uranus in taurus is going to create major technological evolutions in very short and sudden (out of nowhere) periods of time



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: Tarzan the apeman.

you sound out of touch with reality



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: toysforadults

Well, I'm not. Whose reality are we talking about? The norm?



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Tarzan the apeman.

You can remind the people that pizz and moan about their jobs that they should be thankful they even have one, and as the way things are in about 10 years they won’t.

I don’t see why you should have to live in another persons misery, you need some empathy for that, so tell them you don’t want to hear about their grievances. Simples



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

Trust me I have done that. Sorry to the author of the thread if I have caused it to get derailed.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: Assassin82




... Of course from there he puts an emphasis on free education for trade skills that will never go away. A machine could never be a plumber or a mechanic. (Not yet anyway).


That's not how it will happen though. Mankind has a fundamental misunderstanding about automation, and he constantly demonstrates it.

While all these propeller heads are out trying to one-up each other with cooler automation, something else is happening which people fail to notice. As manufacturers and producers continue to shove automation down everyone's throats the world around everyone changes, but rather than take notice they just blindly accept it. So what is this big evil? Well, mankind winds up working for the automation, not the automation working for him.

We see it already. When was the last time you did a tuneup on your car? When was the last time you took your TV in for repair? In the case of the tuneup on your car, the average person can't work on a modern (computer-everything) car. In the case of your TV, the TV repairman is extinct and you just go buy another one. We live in a throw away society.

We use more electricity per person than ever before, practically everything needs to be plugged in. Many people today can't even get out of bed without some electronic gadget. Millions can't work without an electronic gadget. 85% of Americans would have a complete meltdown if they didn't have their cell phone. Machines and automation own us, we don't own them.

When AI and automation eliminate the jobs, then the only jobs will be making automation...for a while. Enter AI, pretty soon that automation will learn how to make better automation all by itself. Then what?

Oh, and those plumbers and mechanics, they'll get replaced too, and here's how...

Over time they'll start building everything in modular pieces. They're doing it already. Houses, buildings and cars will all be built in modules. Square, boring, high density modules. Just like your TV, nothing will get repaired, it will just get replaced. Life will be just like the video in the OP, a boring warehouse full of a bunch of evenly sized square boxes stacked on a pallet. Curves will be replaced with squares, terrain will be shunned for ultra-high density flat spots. Unpredictable will be replaced by predictable. Food will all be made from genetically modified tofu made from soy beans farmed in an ultra-high density hydroponic growing facility with precise artificial lighting and automated harvesters. Choice will be lost. Oh sure, you can still get the red kind with Red #6 dye in it, or Yellow #3 dye.

What other things are curved, and unpredictable, and fallible? Humans?

We will be owned by the automation we have created. And then we will be consumed by it.
With no people there will be no need for buildings, and cars, and food or any products. And all those automated machines will sit idle.

Then there will be silence. There won't be anyone around to worry about global warming, or solar arrays or self-driving cars, there won't be anyone for Alexa to call; there will just be silence.

With automation, we are making ourselves obsolete.

So I guess there really was some truth in the saying...He who dies with the most money (and toys) wins.



I sense you’re an optimist?



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 02:28 PM
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Sure hope more warehouse workers unionise.



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