It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Concrete evidence of a new Human Sense MagnetoReception GeoStorms may affect Alphawaves

page: 1
5

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 11:36 AM
link   
A new sixth sense? Magneto reception? A new study just published in the journal eNeuro by researchers at Caltech offers convincing evidence that changes in Earth's magnetic field can suppress alpha waves in the human brain.

This makes you wonder what other senses we have that haven't been discovered yet OR science isn't willing to look at because it's considered too out there? IONS Dr Dean Radin has done a bunch of reproducible experiments but is considered too out there for MS science....


"It is perhaps not surprising that we might retain at least some functioning neural components [of magnetoreception], especially given the nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle of our not-too-distant ancestors," says Kirschvink.


spaceweatherarchive.com...

Link within for DL of original study....
edit on 29-3-2019 by TheJesuit because: (no reason given)

edit on Fri Mar 29 2019 by DontTreadOnMe because: EXTAGS ADDED IMPORTANT: Using Content From Other Websites on ATS




posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 11:40 AM
link   
a reply to: TheJesuit

Geomagnetic storms result in very slight changes in the Earth's magnetic field. Not enough to move a compass needle.

The study did not produce the evidence of which you speak. Your source:

The Caltech study didn’t look at such small changes, however. Magnetic fields inside their test chamber shifted plus or minus 90 degrees at least. As a result, we do not yet know if human magnetorecepton is sensitive enough to detect the more subtle changes typically associated with space weather.


edit on 3/29/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)


(post by TheJesuit removed for a manners violation)

posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 12:12 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

That' some impressive 4-minute research.

Caltech and Science is losing you!




posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 12:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage



Geomagnetic storms result in very slight changes in the Earth's magnetic field. Not enough to move a compass needle. 


First, mere words before the portion you quote they cite examples of magnetic storm events moving compass needles several degrees. Why on earth would you say that they don't. That it is rare does not make it untrue.


The field was shifted in alignment every 2-3 seconds. Alpha activity was suppressed within 100m/s of field beginning to shift and would then return to normal after approximately one second. That the extent of change in orientation included differences as much 90° shouldn't much matter if they can demonstrate the brain reacted during the transition in sufficient sensitivity to the field moving. In fact, the paper notes that birds and other animals with magnetoreceptors will stop evaluating magnetic field differences approximately 25% of expected value. Which makes them susceptible to local anomalies. They suggest the same thing would occur in humans, but have not tested it yet. The purpose of this experiment was to isolate response to shifts in field 's horizontal alignment and declination/inclination. Which was done successfully.
edit on 29-3-2019 by RadioRobert because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 12:54 PM
link   
a reply to: TheJesuit

It may have an effect on alpha waves, but can people sense those effects? Does it mention anywhere in the study that people can sense these effects? Or are you making claims that are not supported by the article as you so often do?



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 12:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Woodcarver

No. Participants were unaware. It was unconscious which hints it is probably vestigial, but that the receptors even exist and work is still a big deal. Opens questions on how or if we might hone that sense moving forward.



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 01:43 PM
link   
a reply to: RadioRobert

The Carrington event, most extreme geomagnetic storm known in recent history. I should have been more specific. Yes, during extreme events extreme things occur. In Rome the magnetometer recorded a total change of 4.22º over the period of half an hour. (The chart trace from Greenwich magnetometer shown in the article shows a change of 0.238º and was associated with the flare which preceded the geomagnetic storm.)



That the extent of change in orientation included differences as much 90° shouldn't much matter if they can demonstrate the brain reacted during the transition in sufficient sensitivity to the field moving.
I disagree, if the question is whether geomagnetic storms can be "sensed." Because a large and rapid change in magnetic alignment may produce an effect in some people, it does not follow that slight and gradual changes will. Without understanding the mechanism or an experiment which actually tests for it, no such conclusion can be reached.



The purpose of this experiment was to isolate response to shifts in field 's horizontal alignment and declination/inclination. Which was done successfully.
It's an interesting experiment. Some people seem to be able to "sense" large rapid shifts in magentic fields. Hopefully there will be follow ups.

edit on 3/29/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 02:14 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage



In Rome the magnetometer recorded a total change of 4.22º over the period of half an hour

Great, so solar weather can in fact move the compass needle...





I disagree, if the question is whether geomagnetic storms can be "sensed." 

Noone asked that question...





no such conclusion can be reached. 

I didn't see anyone suggest a conclusion was reached. The OP stated it was "evidence that changes in Earth's magnetic field can suppress alpha waves in the human brain". Evidence. The existence of evidence for something does not infer a definitive conclusion.

The study itself acknowledged the "sense" was not consciously noted, and that a different set of experiments would be required to determine to what degree and when such changes in activity occur in more natural settings. The first step was to document the magnetoreceptors do in fact exist and work, are sensitive to inclination/declination, polarity, horizontal displacement, etc - which is what they did. Further experimentation may let us make conclusions.

The fact we have magnetoreceptors is evidence we are sensitive to changes in the field. There is no other reason for the sensors. It is not conclusive, but pretty strong evidence. If it is evidence of a sensitivity required for navigation as it is in other animals exhibiting this trait, it would also be sensitive to deviations caused by changes in the field itself not caused by spatial displacement.



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 02:18 PM
link   
a reply to: TheJesuit

Thanks for thread OP SnF

Wouldn't surprise me! Another ability we have forgotten we have. Would make sense, as we are animals. Surely we'd be equipped with something like this..

To me its all about the nature of the perceiver! I've always imagined what people and our world would be like, had we not been taught at school that we only had 5 senses etc. Imagine what kids would grow up being able to do!

Look the placebo and nocebo effects. They both come from the same action. Mind over matter. The nature of the perceiver.

I'm not sure I would see this as a 'new' sense. Rather one we may have always had, yet due to our cultural perception particularly within the remit of science never 'found' it (or maybe didn't want to find it). Although imho I believe those high up within TPTB are no doubt very well aware of many more abilities/senses. I see it as human abilities/senses being rediscovered. And I have no doubt there may be more to come...

Plus it seems crazy to me, and particularly arrogant of our culture to presume that we are not affected by celestial bodies and the consequences of movements of those bodies, amongst allsorts of other spacey phenomena. Or even our Mother Earth.

This would tie in well with the Schumann resonance too...

Fascinating stuff!




posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 04:04 PM
link   
a reply to: RadioRobert




Noone asked that question...

I should learn to pay no attention to thread titles, I suppose. And there's a reason I placed the word "sense" in quotation marks.

Since the experiment did not involve parameters remotely consistent with geomagnetic storms (extreme or otherwise), there is not evidence (and certainly not "concrete evidence") that such parameters can be "sensed." It does however, provide groundwork for further research.
edit on 3/29/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 04:15 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Well, there is concrete evidence of magnetoreceptors.

And geostorms may affect alpha wave activity.

So what's wrong with the thread title? The fact the forum software kicks punctuation like periods and the reader must rely on contextual clues like the separate complete sentence and capitalization?



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 04:39 PM
link   
So that's what those were. I thought I was feeling shifts from all the incursions into the timeline. Oh, well. Maybe both!



posted on Mar, 29 2019 @ 09:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: Woodcarver
a reply to: TheJesuit

It may have an effect on alpha waves, but can people sense those effects? Does it mention anywhere in the study that people can sense these effects? Or are you making claims that are not supported by the article as you so often do?


Is that all you got? Why are you trolling people?



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 04:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: Groot

originally posted by: Woodcarver
a reply to: TheJesuit

It may have an effect on alpha waves, but can people sense those effects? Does it mention anywhere in the study that people can sense these effects? Or are you making claims that are not supported by the article as you so often do?


Is that all you got? Why are you trolling people?
Can you answer the questions? Or are you just here to call people names?

At no point in this article does it mention that anyone could sense these changes or try to imply that humans have a sense that was just discovered. Although the OP made this claim right there in the title.
edit on 30-3-2019 by Woodcarver because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
5

log in

join