It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

38 percent of stored grain has been lost due to flooding USA

page: 1
15
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 05:17 PM
link   
It is estimated that (so far) the flooding has caused at least 38 percent of the stored grain in the USA to be lost/spoiled.. They may be able to salvage some IMO for fodder for animals but regardless expect products made with wheat, corn, and soy, to increase in price.. Pretty much like the potatoes..

The flooding in some crop areas are bad enough that the planting season is going to take a hit for this years crop harvest. The thread is about the USA crop production but there are many places around the world that are and will suffer crop loss due to weather extremes . youtu.be...




posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 05:36 PM
link   
a reply to: 727Sky

We're seriously considering putting our Texas acreage in to soybeans rather than cotton and onions this season.
The futures markets are going to be tricky for awhile.

www.cmegroup.com...
edit on 26-3-2019 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 05:43 PM
link   
a reply to: 727Sky

Most people in the US don't realize how close we are to widespread hunger. We have one of the only widely stable productive areas in the world, and we feed a lot of mouths around the planet. But, we don't lay in stores against bad years like we used to. All it takes is one or two really disastrous growing years to remind everyone, and I do mean everyone.

There's still a deep, deep freeze in the upper midwest and a lot of snow yet to melt, and we're starting spring storm season for the rest of us. There's a lot of water left to run before we hit the dry parts of summer.

Farmers haven't been able to get into their fields, so right now, this doesn't look like a good year.
edit on 26-3-2019 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 05:44 PM
link   
a reply to: 727Sky

Even Wal-Mart's secret Great Value stockpiles that they use to churn out $0.67 cent bread loaves in all 50 states?

The honey wheat is $0.97 cents but well worth it. Why pay $3+ for fancy name bread like Nature's Own, Pepperidge Farm, Old Tyme when you can get the same thing for 1/3rd of the price? Wonderbread is $2 a loaf here and I know the sandwich seems like it tastes better because it was Wonderbread but Great Value would be indistinguishable in a taste test. It's.. white bread.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 05:47 PM
link   
Ah yes- our ethanol tainted gasoline will spike in price too.
I hadn't considered the stores for grain, my whisky has already gone up more than twenty percent!



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 05:52 PM
link   
Actually wet corn is good to make ethanol with

Wheat can be plowed in for fertilizer either can be burned for fuel.

Much of it can be re dried

It will be a rough growing season but not that bad.




posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:03 PM
link   
I would imagine loss of good topsoil from erosion wouldn't help matters at all.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: a325nt
Ah yes- our ethanol tainted gasoline will spike in price too.
I hadn't considered the stores for grain, my whisky has already gone up more than twenty percent!


I thought whiskey was aged for years in barrels.
I seriously wonder if grain prices are a huge factor in whiskey production costs.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:09 PM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

Supposedly civilization has been reset on multiple occasions possibly from natural disasters such as this. Scary to think something as simple as a flood could end civilization as we know it! History repeating itself?



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:12 PM
link   
a reply to: Bluntone22

Jim Beam was about $23 for 1.75 l about 5 years ago. Now it's over $30. I've had to lower my tastes.

Brown liquor has become more popular as of late. It's because that Kunis chick is selling it on TV.

edit on 3/26/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:17 PM
link   
a reply to: 727Sky


It is estimated that (so far) the flooding has caused at least 38 percent of the stored grain in the USA to be lost/spoiled.
Source?



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:33 PM
link   
And so the crumbling of Western civ starts.

I'm going to try to make some indigenous friends ... or get eaten in the attempt.
edit on 3/26/2019 by Baddogma because: too many periods



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:38 PM
link   
a reply to: 727Sky

I cant find a source anywhere that say 38% flooded.
The more I thought about it the more it sounds awfully high.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:41 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Possibly a mis-statement.

As of Dec. 1, producers in states with flooding - including South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin and Illinois - had 6.75 billion bushels of corn, soybeans and wheat stored on their farms - 38 percent of the total U.S. supplies available at that time, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data.
UPDATE 1-U.S. farmers face devastation following Midwest floods

Article dated March 20,2019 citing Dec. 1, 2018 data. That's how much was stored on farms; not how much was destroyed on farms.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:45 PM
link   
And with the lost crops in Africa from the cyclone, somebody is going to have a bad year.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Bluntone22

Jim Beam was about $23 for 1.75 l about 5 years ago. Now it's over $30. I've had to lower my tastes.

Brown liquor has become more popular as of late. It's because that Kunis chick is selling it on TV.


LOL

Jim Beam!

That was my drink of choice when I was younger.... now it is Makers Mark or Woodford Reserve.

Now, if you want an affordable but better than Jim Beam Bourbon, go with Very Old Barton. For the price, it is very good.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 06:51 PM
link   
a reply to: r0xor

The Bakery Bread at Walmart

INGREDIENTS
enriched flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, wheat bran, yeast, high fructose corn syrup, whole wheat flour, vital wheat gluten, contains 2% or less of; soybean oil, salt, sodium stearoyl lactylate, datem, ammonium sulfate, calcium sulfate, ascorbic acid, enzymes, potassium iodate, azodicarbonamide, l-cysteine monohydrochloride, baking soda, sodium aluminum phosphate, corn starch.


munchies.vice.com...

L-cysteine is an amino acid used to extend the shelf life of commercial bread products and is most commonly synthesized from human hair.


Nature's Own Bread

INGREDIENTS
stone ground whole wheat flour, water, yeast, brown sugar, wheat gluten, contains 2% or less of each of the following: salt, monoglycerides, enzymes, ascorbic acid, soybean oil, vinegar, cultured wheat flour, monocalcium phosphate, soy lecithin.


Pepperifge Farms Bread

INGREDIENTS
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, WATER, WHOLE WHEAT, WHEAT GLUTEN, SUGAR, YEAST, MOLASSES, SOYBEAN OIL, CONTAINS 2% OR LESS OF: SUGARCANE FIBER, SALT, CALCIUM PROPIONATE AND SORBIC ACID TO EXTEND FRESHNESS, MONOGLYCERIDES, DATEM, SOY LECITHIN, WHEY (MILK)*.


Wonder Bread

INGREDIENTS
unbleached enriched flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, high fructose corn syrup, yeast, contains 2% or less of each of the following: calcium carbonate, soybean oil, wheat gluten, salt, dough conditioners (contains one or more of the following: sodium stearoyl lactylate, calcium stearoyl lactylate, monoglycerides, mono- and diglycerides, azodicarbonamide, enzymes, ascorbic acid), vinegar, monocalcium phosphate, yeast extract, modified corn starch, sucrose, sugar, soy lecithin, cholecalciferol (vitamin d3), soy flour, ammonium sulfate, calcium sulfate, calcium propionate (to retard spoilage).


I'll gladly pay extra to have human hairless bread.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 07:17 PM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

Not to mention the grain that is being grown is the same everywhere. There is the risk of a fungus, disease, or natural disaster that could wipe it out. Mankind has messed with nature and is relying on it being the be all and end all. It could actually end up being the unforeseen "end all".



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 07:25 PM
link   
For right now, I'd say look at the floods of '93 and see what the potential impact is. We aren't anywhere near that level yet, but the recent river crests were close in this area. If things do not dry out with all the melt yet to go ... well, we may be looking at a wet year.



posted on Mar, 26 2019 @ 07:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: 727Sky

Most people in the US don't realize how close we are to widespread hunger.


That's because we're complete retards when it comes to locally grown food -- the moron in one state would rather cheap out with the food trucked across the country and sold on the cheap than eat the food farmers in their own regions/areas grow. And then there's some areas of the country where they just don't diversify for s#. Florida's a good example of lacking in agricultural diversity -- if they were to ramp up the warm/hot climate veggies more, there'd be more than tomatoes, strawberries and citrus groves to live on locally.

In the few years since we moved to MI, with the exception of some fruits that cannot be grown in this zone that we don't rely on, but rather splurge on (orange, bananas, etc) we haven't bought hardly ANYTHING not grown or slaughtered in MI. And we're getting used to eating what's available seasonally, too, this is not a hard thing to adapt to. People are just too damn stupid to do it. They'd consistently rather have their quick-fix Kraft mac & cheese and TV dinners manufactured halfway across the country instead of whipping something up that came from a farm an hour or two away.

If you can't be bothered to at least try to eat local, or if you're in an area with very limited agricultural variety, it's not my fault you're going hungry. The farms made poor crop choices, and you're not helping.



new topics

top topics



 
15
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join