It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NJ Democrats Work to Remove ‘Huckleberry Finn’ From Schools

page: 5
29
<< 2  3  4    6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight


And that's exactly where a good educator can take that scenario and turn it into a relevant teaching example about the use and context of that word in both the past and present.



Good point, maybe they will turn it around and figure out how to present it differently.

Did you know?



BANNED: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It began rolling off American printing presses in February of 1885. By March, librarians in Concord, Massachusetts deemed it “trash” and “suitable only for the slums.” It was the first time the book was banned in the United States, but it certainly wouldn't be the last.




Why has Huck Finn consistently landed on the list of banned and challenged books?

I think that it’s landed on the list of banned books because it goes where Americans really don’t want to go. We talk about race and racism and acceptance and inclusivity and equity. We talk at that, but we don’t really listen and engage in a real substantive conversation. I think that Huck Finn will remain on the banned books list because it will remain a burr under the saddle of so many people — because it goes to the heart of what still bothers us to this day.


www.pbs.org...


Actually...that's not why it was banned...it.had nothing to do with race


Upon issue of the American edition in 1885 several libraries banned it from their shelves.[25] The early criticism focused on what was perceived as the book's crudeness. 

The Concord (Mass.) Public Library committee has decided to exclude Mark Twain's latest book from the library. One member of the committee says that, while he does not wish to call it immoral, he thinks it contains but little humor, and that of a very coarse type. He regards it as the veriest trash. The library and the other members of the committee entertain similar views, characterizing it as rough, coarse, and inelegant, dealing with a series of experiences not elevating, the whole book being more suited to the slums than to intelligent, respectable people.[26]


It was banned because it was deemed lowbrow.
edit on 23/3/2019 by dug88 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:22 PM
link   
a reply to: InTheLight


They haven't done anything here yet, it's only a resolution looking for signees.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 01:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight


You don't have to go that far back in time to learn about the plight of African-Americans in U.S.A., just watch the news.


You obviously haven't either read or comprehended the book in question if you think it's solely about 'the plight of African-Americans'.


I was referring to the 'N' word still being used today.


LMAO.........

"Im uncomfortable with period literature because of the use of the N word in the book"

*turns on rap music at lunch *

Give me a break


It depends on who is saying that word and to whom. Context is everything.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 01:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight


And that's exactly where a good educator can take that scenario and turn it into a relevant teaching example about the use and context of that word in both the past and present.



Good point, maybe they will turn it around and figure out how to present it differently.

Did you know?



BANNED: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It began rolling off American printing presses in February of 1885. By March, librarians in Concord, Massachusetts deemed it “trash” and “suitable only for the slums.” It was the first time the book was banned in the United States, but it certainly wouldn't be the last.




Why has Huck Finn consistently landed on the list of banned and challenged books?

I think that it’s landed on the list of banned books because it goes where Americans really don’t want to go. We talk about race and racism and acceptance and inclusivity and equity. We talk at that, but we don’t really listen and engage in a real substantive conversation. I think that Huck Finn will remain on the banned books list because it will remain a burr under the saddle of so many people — because it goes to the heart of what still bothers us to this day.


www.pbs.org...


Actually...that's not why it was banned...it.had nothing to do with race


Upon issue of the American edition in 1885 several libraries banned it from their shelves.[25] The early criticism focused on what was perceived as the book's crudeness. 

The Concord (Mass.) Public Library committee has decided to exclude Mark Twain's latest book from the library. One member of the committee says that, while he does not wish to call it immoral, he thinks it contains but little humor, and that of a very coarse type. He regards it as the veriest trash. The library and the other members of the committee entertain similar views, characterizing it as rough, coarse, and inelegant, dealing with a series of experiences not elevating, the whole book being more suited to the slums than to intelligent, respectable people.[26]


It was banned because it was deemed lowbrow.


Well, I posted the opinion of this lady as to why she believes this book was banned and/or challenged.



Jocelyn A. Chadwick began her career as a classroom English teacher and is President of National Council of Teachers of English. She is a former professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and is an internationally recognized Twain scholar. American Experience spoke with her about Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

How do students react to this book?

Before 2012, students were curious about race, racism, the 19th century — what was that like? And I think they saw Huck Finn — the character and the novel — as a literary history lesson. I would go into a school for days and I’d bring in the art, images, the primary sources. Now, the key word to me is relevance. With this particular generation of young people, everything has to be relevant to them and to their experiences. They want to know how a text “fits” in to who they are. Now it’s about social context. It’s about equality and equity and ethics writ large.




The NAACP in the '50s lodged the first major complaint about the novel’s using the racial slur “N” over and over and over — more than 200 times throughout.


Relevant? That was my question regarding this issue at the outset of this debate.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 01:30 PM
link   


“The novel’s use of a racial slur and its depiction of racist attitudes can cause students to feel upset, marginalized or humiliated and can create an uncomfortable atmosphere in the classroom,”


I think that was the whole point. Make people think about racism and it's effect on people? Probably why it was included in the syllabus to begin with.

I dunno, I guess if something makes you upset to think about you shouldn't think about it. Just think happy thoughts. God help these kids when they get to the Holocaust in history...



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 01:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight


And that's exactly where a good educator can take that scenario and turn it into a relevant teaching example about the use and context of that word in both the past and present.



Good point, maybe they will turn it around and figure out how to present it differently.

Did you know?



BANNED: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It began rolling off American printing presses in February of 1885. By March, librarians in Concord, Massachusetts deemed it “trash” and “suitable only for the slums.” It was the first time the book was banned in the United States, but it certainly wouldn't be the last.




Why has Huck Finn consistently landed on the list of banned and challenged books?

I think that it’s landed on the list of banned books because it goes where Americans really don’t want to go. We talk about race and racism and acceptance and inclusivity and equity. We talk at that, but we don’t really listen and engage in a real substantive conversation. I think that Huck Finn will remain on the banned books list because it will remain a burr under the saddle of so many people — because it goes to the heart of what still bothers us to this day.


www.pbs.org...


Actually...that's not why it was banned...it.had nothing to do with race


Upon issue of the American edition in 1885 several libraries banned it from their shelves.[25] The early criticism focused on what was perceived as the book's crudeness. 

The Concord (Mass.) Public Library committee has decided to exclude Mark Twain's latest book from the library. One member of the committee says that, while he does not wish to call it immoral, he thinks it contains but little humor, and that of a very coarse type. He regards it as the veriest trash. The library and the other members of the committee entertain similar views, characterizing it as rough, coarse, and inelegant, dealing with a series of experiences not elevating, the whole book being more suited to the slums than to intelligent, respectable people.[26]


It was banned because it was deemed lowbrow.


Well, I posted the opinion of this lady as to why she believes this book was banned and/or challenged.



Jocelyn A. Chadwick began her career as a classroom English teacher and is President of National Council of Teachers of English. She is a former professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and is an internationally recognized Twain scholar. American Experience spoke with her about Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

How do students react to this book?

Before 2012, students were curious about race, racism, the 19th century — what was that like? And I think they saw Huck Finn — the character and the novel — as a literary history lesson. I would go into a school for days and I’d bring in the art, images, the primary sources. Now, the key word to me is relevance. With this particular generation of young people, everything has to be relevant to them and to their experiences. They want to know how a text “fits” in to who they are. Now it’s about social context. It’s about equality and equity and ethics writ large.




The NAACP in the '50s lodged the first major complaint about the novel’s using the racial slur “N” over and over and over — more than 200 times throughout.


Relevant? That was my question regarding this issue at the outset of this debate.


I dunno, our teacher read us that book in elementary school. There were black kids in my class. My asian teacher used the word 'n-word' over 200 times. Nobody gave a #. There was a simple conversation about how it's an inappropriate, hurtful word that was being used in context at the time. That was it. There was no complaints, nobody got uncomfortable, no parents flipped out and the teacher was able to use the book as a way to teach us about the way people were historically at a time when we didn't really understand such things. It was a good lesson...

Better than...Ahhh Omfg 'n-word', racist, i'm sad...burn it....



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 01:56 PM
link   
it's time to ban history. All of it. Erase the past and start fresh. That way, we can have lots and lots of new mistakes to make and feel special as if we are the first ones to make them.

Stupid people won't rest until they have surrounded themselves with nothing but more stupid people.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 02:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: dug88

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight


And that's exactly where a good educator can take that scenario and turn it into a relevant teaching example about the use and context of that word in both the past and present.



Good point, maybe they will turn it around and figure out how to present it differently.

Did you know?



BANNED: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It began rolling off American printing presses in February of 1885. By March, librarians in Concord, Massachusetts deemed it “trash” and “suitable only for the slums.” It was the first time the book was banned in the United States, but it certainly wouldn't be the last.




Why has Huck Finn consistently landed on the list of banned and challenged books?

I think that it’s landed on the list of banned books because it goes where Americans really don’t want to go. We talk about race and racism and acceptance and inclusivity and equity. We talk at that, but we don’t really listen and engage in a real substantive conversation. I think that Huck Finn will remain on the banned books list because it will remain a burr under the saddle of so many people — because it goes to the heart of what still bothers us to this day.


www.pbs.org...


Actually...that's not why it was banned...it.had nothing to do with race


Upon issue of the American edition in 1885 several libraries banned it from their shelves.[25] The early criticism focused on what was perceived as the book's crudeness. 

The Concord (Mass.) Public Library committee has decided to exclude Mark Twain's latest book from the library. One member of the committee says that, while he does not wish to call it immoral, he thinks it contains but little humor, and that of a very coarse type. He regards it as the veriest trash. The library and the other members of the committee entertain similar views, characterizing it as rough, coarse, and inelegant, dealing with a series of experiences not elevating, the whole book being more suited to the slums than to intelligent, respectable people.[26]


It was banned because it was deemed lowbrow.


Well, I posted the opinion of this lady as to why she believes this book was banned and/or challenged.



Jocelyn A. Chadwick began her career as a classroom English teacher and is President of National Council of Teachers of English. She is a former professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and is an internationally recognized Twain scholar. American Experience spoke with her about Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

How do students react to this book?

Before 2012, students were curious about race, racism, the 19th century — what was that like? And I think they saw Huck Finn — the character and the novel — as a literary history lesson. I would go into a school for days and I’d bring in the art, images, the primary sources. Now, the key word to me is relevance. With this particular generation of young people, everything has to be relevant to them and to their experiences. They want to know how a text “fits” in to who they are. Now it’s about social context. It’s about equality and equity and ethics writ large.




The NAACP in the '50s lodged the first major complaint about the novel’s using the racial slur “N” over and over and over — more than 200 times throughout.


Relevant? That was my question regarding this issue at the outset of this debate.


I dunno, our teacher read us that book in elementary school. There were black kids in my class. My asian teacher used the word 'n-word' over 200 times. Nobody gave a #. There was a simple conversation about how it's an inappropriate, hurtful word that was being used in context at the time. That was it. There was no complaints, nobody got uncomfortable, no parents flipped out and the teacher was able to use the book as a way to teach us about the way people were historically at a time when we didn't really understand such things. It was a good lesson...

Better than...Ahhh Omfg 'n-word', racist, i'm sad...burn it....


Well, the use of his book as a teaching aid in schools has been challenged by African Americans for a long time now.



• Also in 1996, Upper Dublin High School in Pennsylvania decided to drop the book from their required reading list after African American parents complained that the use of the 'n' word made their children uncomfortable.




• In 1997 in Columbus, Indiana (my hometown - I actually remember this happening!) members of an AFrian American community protested the use of Huck Finn in the school's high school classes. The Reverend Charles Sims stated that exposing the book to African American children was 'degrading' and 'insensitive.'


huckfinnhuddle.weebly.com...

Go to 5:17 and 9:19 marks on video - listen to the opinions of actual African-American students.



Where is the teachable moment when the student is uncomfortable or feeling degraded?



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 04:34 PM
link   
If teachers could still teach instead of indoctrinate, they would be capable of explaining why Huck used that language, why it was derogatory, and how Huck grew as a person as he learned from educated folks...but then again, teachers don’t really teach anymore, do they?



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 04:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: IAMTAT

When I read about it yesterday I didn't like that idea but then I wonder what a black kid could feel reading that book in school.... I don't know.


Why not wonder what we whites feel? Shouldn't it make us feel uncomfortable too? There are some very ugly realities about how things were in that book, but that was what Twain was a master of -- writing it as it was. That's why he's a figure in the literary canon.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 05:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: toolgal462
You always crack me up!


Thanks, but in my humorous replies is often the reality.

This book is not going to ruin your children's lives, it isn't going to adversely impact them in the future. Life isn't a parade of puppies and kittens and where you're always comfortable. Learning how life was in the past, viewed in the case via the prism of Twain's fantastic literature, is highly important. It gives you have a better understanding of the times our ancestors inhabited and a greater appreciation for your own.


You don't have to go that far back in time to learn about the plight of African-Americans in U.S.A., just watch the news.


Nonstop CNN in classrooms is PHASE 2.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 05:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: IAMTAT

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: toolgal462
You always crack me up!


Thanks, but in my humorous replies is often the reality.

This book is not going to ruin your children's lives, it isn't going to adversely impact them in the future. Life isn't a parade of puppies and kittens and where you're always comfortable. Learning how life was in the past, viewed in the case via the prism of Twain's fantastic literature, is highly important. It gives you have a better understanding of the times our ancestors inhabited and a greater appreciation for your own.


You don't have to go that far back in time to learn about the plight of African-Americans in U.S.A., just watch the news.


Nonstop CNN in classrooms is PHASE 2.


www.foxnews.com...



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 05:10 PM
link   
a reply to: InTheLight


The pizza manager read 'Huck Finn' in school?

What is your point?



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 05:12 PM
link   
deleted, nm
edit on 23-3-2019 by NoCorruptionAllowed because: deleted



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 09:24 PM
link   
are they going to ban jay-z as well?



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 09:34 PM
link   
Next up ...

We must ban Moby Dick because it sends the wrong message about animal rights and it makes children uncomfortable to read so many passages about endangered animal slaughter.
edit on 23-3-2019 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 09:38 PM
link   
Cowards and tyrants ban things.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 09:40 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy

Oh, but no one will care because they're only books written old, dead white men. So they were all inherently oppressive anyhow.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 09:46 PM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

Need I repeat myself?




posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 09:54 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy

I've already started producing the avant garde literature of the future.

It feature enough main characters that everyone in every victim demographic can identify with at least one in some way.

I don't know what the plot will be, but it won't matter because everyone will identify with at least one character personally. That's what will make it an instant classic worth reading forever in classrooms.




new topics

top topics



 
29
<< 2  3  4    6 >>

log in

join