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NJ Democrats Work to Remove ‘Huckleberry Finn’ From Schools

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posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 11:56 AM
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originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask
a reply to: InTheLight




It is still not for you or I to determine what measures are taken in schools regarding this book it is up to the students


Actually yes it is up to me to determine how schools teach my children............that said I hope you dont have any kids, because apparently you think its the Schools job to decide how they are taught.......




educators and parents who are trying to foster an environment of inclusion,


Literature doesnt exclude anyone...........this is a stupid premise........




but like I said the message could be relayed in many other ways without making anyone feel uncomfortable.


Again this "comfortable" narrative is one of the biggest problems in society now days.......


Well, we won't agree on whose decision it is, but ultimately when those students objected to this book their reasons were listened to and their feelings respected.




posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 11:56 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
I do not live in the U.S. but the same processes are here in my country. Guess what, the school administration and Board make up the rules according to what the students and parents want.


So the parents are involved? This is right after you said 'It is still not for you or I to determine'.

The reality is WE ARE INVOLVED. Our school budget is $122million, someone can bet their sweet ass I'm invovled in where that money goes.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 11:56 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight


You don't have to go that far back in time to learn about the plight of African-Americans in U.S.A., just watch the news.


You obviously haven't either read or comprehended the book in question if you think it's solely about 'the plight of African-Americans'.


I was referring to the 'N' word still being used today.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: SprocketUK
I get that some will be sensitised by this, I don't like the idea of denying others the chance to learn about important literary works because of it though. Maybe they could run two lit classes? The open one and the restricted, that way no one has to miss out or feel bad.


That would use up too much resource money, that is why the book stays in the library for any interested students.


Yeah but that is not the same as reading and talking about it as a class. It's possible to read a book and still miss the various points the author makes.

Hell, pretty much every bit of art will make someone uncomfortable, from Mister Greedy through to, say Guernica by Picasso.

Hitler banned books and paintings he didn't like, it narrows our perspective, denying art in this way.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight
I do not live in the U.S. but the same processes are here in my country. Guess what, the school administration and Board make up the rules according to what the students and parents want.


So the parents are involved? This is right after you said 'It is still not for you or I to determine'.

The reality is WE ARE INVOLVED. Our school budget is $122million, someone can bet their sweet ass I'm invovled in where that money goes.


Then you can go head-to-head with the parents and the students that felt uncomfortable with the reading of that book at the next PTA meeting.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
I was referring to the 'N' word still being used today.


That book isn't the use of that word. Next we'll be banning other books that used the word 'fag' for a cigarette or sticks because 'feelz'.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:00 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
Then you can go head-to-head with the parents and the students that felt uncomfortable with the reading of that book at the next PTA meeting.


Exactly. Which kinda disproves your point that we have no input or aren't able to get involved. Book bannings don't fly here.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:01 PM
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originally posted by: SprocketUK

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: SprocketUK
I get that some will be sensitised by this, I don't like the idea of denying others the chance to learn about important literary works because of it though. Maybe they could run two lit classes? The open one and the restricted, that way no one has to miss out or feel bad.


That would use up too much resource money, that is why the book stays in the library for any interested students.


Yeah but that is not the same as reading and talking about it as a class. It's possible to read a book and still miss the various points the author makes.

Hell, pretty much every bit of art will make someone uncomfortable, from Mister Greedy through to, say Guernica by Picasso.

Hitler banned books and paintings he didn't like, it narrows our perspective, denying art in this way.


As one poster stated previously, this book was written for adults not for children and so I wonder why it was selected at a childlren's teaching tool in the first place? Was it selected back in the 1950s, 60s?



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight
Then you can go head-to-head with the parents and the students that felt uncomfortable with the reading of that book at the next PTA meeting.


Exactly. Which kinda disproves your point that we have no input or aren't able to get involved. Book bannings don't fly here.


I didn't say you could not be involved, but the final decision is not yours.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight


You don't have to go that far back in time to learn about the plight of African-Americans in U.S.A., just watch the news.


You obviously haven't either read or comprehended the book in question if you think it's solely about 'the plight of African-Americans'.


I was referring to the 'N' word still being used today.


LMAO.........

"Im uncomfortable with period literature because of the use of the N word in the book"

*turns on rap music at lunch *

Give me a break
edit on 3/23/2019 by ManBehindTheMask because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
I didn't say you could not be involved, but the final decision is not yours.


Yeah, it is. If I'm in the majority of not banning something than I was part of the final decision.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: SprocketUK

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: SprocketUK
I get that some will be sensitised by this, I don't like the idea of denying others the chance to learn about important literary works because of it though. Maybe they could run two lit classes? The open one and the restricted, that way no one has to miss out or feel bad.


That would use up too much resource money, that is why the book stays in the library for any interested students.


Yeah but that is not the same as reading and talking about it as a class. It's possible to read a book and still miss the various points the author makes.

Hell, pretty much every bit of art will make someone uncomfortable, from Mister Greedy through to, say Guernica by Picasso.

Hitler banned books and paintings he didn't like, it narrows our perspective, denying art in this way.


As one poster stated previously, this book was written for adults not for children and so I wonder why it was selected at a childlren's teaching tool in the first place? Was it selected back in the 1950s, 60s?


Pretty much everyone I know who has read it did so as a kid.
That's a nothing argument. There are hundreds of books written for adults that kids love and also a fair few written for kids that adults like, Harry Potter for instance.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask


But muh feelz!



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight
I was referring to the 'N' word still being used today.


That book isn't the use of that word. Next we'll be banning other books that used the word 'fag' for a cigarette or sticks because 'feelz'.





The feelings and reaction of students may depend on the demographics of the student population. In schools that are predominantly African American, students may feel more comfortable with the word, although not necessarily with its repeated use by white characters in a "classic" text. When African American students are in the minority, however, they often feel embarrassed and singled out. Said one African American student in Cherry Hill, "Every time the word came up [during oral reading], everybody turned around to look at me." It's equally important, however, to address the issue regardless of whether the class is racially mixed or homogeneous.


www.pbs.org...



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight


And that's exactly where a good educator can take that scenario and turn it into a relevant teaching example about the use and context of that word in both the past and present.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: InTheLight
I didn't say you could not be involved, but the final decision is not yours.


Yeah, it is. If I'm in the majority of not banning something than I was part of the final decision.


But when inclusion comes into the picture, your point of view won't be in the majority.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
But when inclusion comes into the picture, your point of view won't be in the majority.


Oh, you have a crystal ball now? Call me when this gets banned, which it won't.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:11 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight


And that's exactly where a good educator can take that scenario and turn it into a relevant teaching example about the use and context of that word in both the past and present.



Good point, maybe they will turn it around and figure out how to present it differently.

Did you know?



BANNED: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It began rolling off American printing presses in February of 1885. By March, librarians in Concord, Massachusetts deemed it “trash” and “suitable only for the slums.” It was the first time the book was banned in the United States, but it certainly wouldn't be the last.




Why has Huck Finn consistently landed on the list of banned and challenged books?

I think that it’s landed on the list of banned books because it goes where Americans really don’t want to go. We talk about race and racism and acceptance and inclusivity and equity. We talk at that, but we don’t really listen and engage in a real substantive conversation. I think that Huck Finn will remain on the banned books list because it will remain a burr under the saddle of so many people — because it goes to the heart of what still bothers us to this day.


www.pbs.org...



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight


Kind of proves the point on why it shouldn't be banned. Only morons want books like this banned.



posted on Mar, 23 2019 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: InTheLight


Kind of proves the point on why it shouldn't be banned. Only morons want books like this banned.


Well they took it out of classrooms and left it in the library, so it really is not banned.




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