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Brexit: Revoke Article 50 petition crashes Parliament website

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posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

Thanks for that information. I'm very gun shy where online polls and petitions are concerned. This technological age opens the door wide for a ridiculous amount of narrative control and statistical manipulation, both from agenda driving pollsters and politicians running the petition and outside groups intent on pushing their views to the forefront.

As an outsider watching all of this, I believe the UK had their referendum vote, the people spoke, and now the politicians and EU loving Brits need to accept the fact that they lost and GTFO of the EU as the majority of Brits voted to do NOW. There should be no do-over, no foot dragging, and no more discussion, just do it.




posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

I don't think it's a new government we need but a new system of government where our elected officials are actually accountable to the public , I don't know what that system would look like but it's clear our current system is inadequate for modern day challenges and lacks understanding of what democracy really is.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




Referendums are problematic at the best of times


Really thats the best you can come up with? What with life peerages; you seriously think the system isn't rigged already?

We had a referendum in Aus to talk about becoming a republic. The problem was it was worded in such a way that we would have a President and a PM. LOL they werent serious about giving us a real republic. Just a pretend one.


en.wikipedia.org...


Many opinions were put forward for the defeat, some relating to perceived difficulties with the parliamentary appointment model, others relating to the lack of public engagement or that most Australians were simply happy to keep the status quo. Some republicans voted no because they did not agree with provisions such as the president being instantly dismissible by the prime minister.


Many republic's have a PM & a President.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

I agree it was close, never heard of the super majority requirement before, so not sure it should be applied to one vote and not others. You want my truth if i had never been given the vote I would not have been kicking and screaming to leave, it was only because i was given a choice, i took my choice as others did democratically answering a simple question



I take no blame for X in leave, as there was no more requirement from me than that, i was not asked to become a finacial expert and judge the UKs long term stability, i was not asked to consider how to finacially support the farmers/fishermen etc, that was and has always been a job for the politicians with far more (supposedly) insight and expertise in these matters than myself.

Perhaps what we are seeing is the current batch of MP's would struggle to tie their own shoelaces, which has led to this absolute farce



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

Hey guess what, you missed this? Should be interesting

www.abovetopsecret.com...


"The Brexit mess keeps on getting messier. Now a rule dating from 1604 could see the UK crash out of the EU even though MPs have voted against just that.





Mr Bercow cited a parliamentary convention dating back to 1604 and reaffirmed in 1864, 1870, 1882, 1891 and 1912. This declares that the question “may not be brought forward again during the same session” of parliament. “One of the reasons the rule has lasted so long is that it is a necessary rule to ensure the sensible use of the house’s time and the proper respect for the decisions it takes,” Mr Bercow said.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: fakedirt




I had three different conversations with businessmen this morning and the resonance is should parliament torpedo the 29th things will kick-off big style and they were all of the opinion that the houses are no longer representing the peoples decisions and have strayed far too deep into the eu's pockets.


These odds were posted in my thread - sorry the poster didn't leave a link to check

www.abovetopsecret.com...




Oddschecker insight article
It's now as short as 7/2 that the UK leaves without a withdrawal agreement. Just 24 hours ago, it was 7/1 that the UK leaves the EU on March 30th with no withdrawal agreement in place. Since then, bookmakers have decisively slashed the odds into 7/2. In the last 24 hours, a whopping 87% of total bets have gone on the UK to leave in ten days’ time with no agreement



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

But...they have to make it difficult.
If they made this easy next week Spain would be looking to vote to leave.



And there are other countries watching waiting taking tips on how to leave.....

Dont you wonder IF the EU was so great why are some countries desperate

to leave?

Like prisoners waiting to break out of the prison they are in!!



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: eletheia

originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

But...they have to make it difficult.
If they made this easy next week Spain would be looking to vote to leave.



And there are other countries watching waiting taking tips on how to leave.....

Dont you wonder IF the EU was so great why are some countries desperate

to leave?

Like prisoners waiting to break out of the prison they are in!!




Which countries are desperate to leave the EU?



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




Its honestly because I do believe it is the only way forward that would be in the best interests of the country


Funny how you didn't respect the will of the US people in your many anti-Trump threads and long posts. Your short answers here prove again your agenda.

Britain will survive - in fact they will flourish as other global economies take up the slack. Competition can only be good for the common man, no?

But why bring facts into an emotional plea - because thats all you're really doing here.

www.politico.eu...


Trading restrictions work both ways, so any attempt by Brussels to punish the disobedient Brits by preventing them exporting agricultural goods to the EU might encourage the British government to find sudden reasons to stop the importation of German motor cars. Or Irish beef. Or French wine. Have you tried new-world merlots? They can be rather good. And good value. No deal would, in fact, have tremendous advantages. It would allow Britain immediately to negotiate and sign trade deals beyond Europe. It would force May’s government to cut taxes to make us more competitive. It would result in a tremendous boost to national unity.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Didnt miss it just chose not to comment on it.

Its a well established rule of parliament. Nothing more really to say on it.

Also while am responding, my views on Trump have nothing to do with Brexit but good work in managing to drag him into it.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

Its alright - contingency plans in place. You really think the Brit bureaucrats havent thought this through?


uk.reuters.com...


Britain has stepped up planning for the effects of such a departure and on Thursday published 28 technical notices here covering the impact on areas ranging from environmental standards to certification for manufacturers.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:41 PM
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originally posted by: eletheia

originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

But...they have to make it difficult.
If they made this easy next week Spain would be looking to vote to leave.



And there are other countries watching waiting taking tips on how to leave.....

Dont you wonder IF the EU was so great why are some countries desperate

to leave?

Like prisoners waiting to break out of the prison they are in!!




To be fair there is a eurosceptic view among the electorate of all European states to a greater or lesser extent, if the UK was to get a nice clean break from Europe, getting most of what we want and a nice treading partnership set up and ready to go then I think the view of the EU would be that would then embolden these eurosceptics in these countries making them more popular and therefore leading to a bigger call for them to leave. Its not so much that they are desperate to leave rather that a nice easy Brexit would make their eurosceptic movements seem more attractive.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

Its alright - contingency plans in place. You really think the Brit bureaucrats havent thought this through?


uk.reuters.com...


Britain has stepped up planning for the effects of such a departure and on Thursday published 28 technical notices here covering the impact on areas ranging from environmental standards to certification for manufacturers.


Contingency plan don't make me laugh, they gave a ferry contract to a firm with no ships, just today there has been a warning about medication supplies as a direct result of Brexit and they have put troops on standby.

I am not going to do your research for you but if you are interested, and you seem to be, then actually look at the negative impact of a no-deal Brexit. There is a reason nobody wants it.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:47 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




Its honestly because I do believe it is the only way forward that would be in the best interests of the country


Funny how you didn't respect the will of the US people in your many anti-Trump threads and long posts. Your short answers here prove again your agenda.

Britain will survive - in fact they will flourish as other global economies take up the slack. Competition can only be good for the common man, no?

But why bring facts into an emotional plea - because thats all you're really doing here.

www.politico.eu...


Trading restrictions work both ways, so any attempt by Brussels to punish the disobedient Brits by preventing them exporting agricultural goods to the EU might encourage the British government to find sudden reasons to stop the importation of German motor cars. Or Irish beef. Or French wine. Have you tried new-world merlots? They can be rather good. And good value. No deal would, in fact, have tremendous advantages. It would allow Britain immediately to negotiate and sign trade deals beyond Europe. It would force May’s government to cut taxes to make us more competitive. It would result in a tremendous boost to national unity.



I am sure Quentin Letts degree in medieval literature make him the ideal person to comment on the UK economy post brexit.

Apparently New World Merlots being perfectly acceptable is more than a counter point to treasury analysis of the cost of a no deal brexit.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: ScepticScot

I was talking about the "claytons' republic referendum that we ( Aust ) were given to vote on. The wiki link showed that.


google:


In such systems, the president has genuine executive authority, unlike in a parliamentary republic, but the role of a head of government may be exercised by the prime minister.



I noticed that this was difficult for you to comment on...


Really thats the best you can come up with? What with life peerages; you seriously think the system isn't rigged already?



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 02:00 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: ScepticScot

I was talking about the "claytons' republic referendum that we ( Aust ) were given to vote on. The wiki link showed that.


google:


In such systems, the president has genuine executive authority, unlike in a parliamentary republic, but the role of a head of government may be exercised by the prime minister.



I noticed that this was difficult for you to comment on...


Really thats the best you can come up with? What with life peerages; you seriously think the system isn't rigged already?


Many republic's have both PM and president. In some the president is a largely symbolic head of state. Not why sure that means they are not a real republic?

Not sure why I would comment on the other part since it was in no way addressed to me?
edit on 21-3-2019 by ScepticScot because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Oddschecker insight article

@othersideof ; it's not the first time thousands of foreigners have tried to have influence over UK affairs . And what about the time that Berlusconi slimed his way over here and tried to 'petition' Cameron not to keep his campaign promise to hold the referendum . "It wouldn't be the first time a campaign promise wasn't kept " , he said . What a dirty slug
And people , some of them , want to keep Britain in that kind of peril ? Where their vote for their national politicians counts for nothing effectively , and when there have been countless scenarios like that Berlusconi incident . Surely by now still wanting to remain is either very misguided , or downright willful ignorance .



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




"The Brexit mess keeps on getting messier. Now a rule dating from 1604 could see the UK crash out of the EU even though MPs have voted against just that.


Crash out anyway - of course its not important - Parliamentary rules, LOL.

I only dragged Trump into it because you were very vocal in those threads on how another country should not respect the will of the people and here again you are playing duck and weave and fearmongering over Brexit and not respecting the will of the vote.

How is May any different than Merkel? She's a patsy for the EU.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight




I only dragged Trump into it because you were very vocal in those threads on how another country should not respect the will of the people


Directly quote me (in full please) or shut up.

Sorry getting really fed up of members in this thread putting words into my mouth.



posted on Mar, 21 2019 @ 02:09 PM
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originally posted by: SoEpic
a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

If Spain came to its senses then it would want to leave too. I can wait to leave the EU, they are just a bully.
They wont let their accounts be audited in over 20 years.



indeed and if you quietly do some research you may find thousands of eu offshore accounts for the purposes of........wait, don't take my word for it coz i'm an brexit asshat lol!

f.



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