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Meet Steve, a New Kind of Aurora Borealis

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posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 07:59 PM
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This week we’re staying close to home, because there’s a new visitor in town: Everyone, meet Steve. Steve is short for Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement, and is a new kind of aurora on earth. You might know the aurora better as the northern lights, but you haven’t seen aurora borealis like this, not like Steve.
...
A citizen scientist in Canada was observing the aurora borealis just for fun when he spotted a long sliver of purple with green stripes overhead. These were new features, and he nicknamed the phenomenon Steve. Atmospheric researchers are now encouraging citizen scientists who live in the northern parts of the globe to keep a close watch out for Steve. NASA will use ground observations alongside satellite data to learn exactly what Steve’s up to and how it’s creating a new show of lights.
...

www.wired.com...

Although this phenomenon (STEVE) is not relatively new, as it has been spotted for about a couple of decades now, it is in fact a new phenomenon to the scientific community.

Steve (Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement) is comprised of "fast moving stream of extremely hot particles called a sub auroral ion drift, or SAID." SAIDS have been studied since the 1970s, but no one knew that SAIDS had a visual effect.

STEVE is not a normal Aurora. Although it occurs at the sub Aurora zone, a zone that is further south than regular Auroras are seen, STEVE only appears in the presence of auroras.









The above photos were taken from the following link.

Astronomers Solve the Mystery of Purple Lights in the Upper Atmosphere

Here is more information on STEVE.


On the Origin of STEVE: Particle Precipitation or Ionospheric Skyglow?

B. Gallardo‐Lacourt, J. Liang, Y. Nishimura, E. Donovan
...
An important and fundamental question that arises from this study is the origin of STEVE; more specifically, does STEVE correspond to a new ionospheric phenomenon or is it due to particle precipitation? In this letter, we analyze a STEVE event on 28 March 2008 observed by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) ground‐based All‐Sky Imagers and a Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES). The POES‐17 satellite crossed STEVE at the center of the All‐Sky Imager field‐of‐view, allowing us to collect particle data simultaneously. These concurrent measurements show that STEVE might not be associated with particle precipitation (electrons or ions). Therefore, this event suggests that STEVE's skyglow (which we defined to be unrelated to aurora or airglow) could be generated in the ionosphere.
...


On the Origin of STEVE: Particle Precipitation or Ionospheric Skyglow?

According to the study above, it seems that Steve is a new ionospheric phenomenon.



edit on 19-3-2019 by ElectricUniverse because: add comment and correct excerpt.




posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 08:56 PM
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Very pretty.

The name irks me, though.

This planet was a blob of molten rock once- billions of years have passed since life formed.

This isn't new, it's just undocumented until now.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 09:03 PM
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We met Steve last year.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 09:32 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
We met Steve last year.
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Well Phage... Here you have a more recent article with more info.

Meet 'Steve,' the rare celestial phenomenon lighting up the skies over Canada



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Everything old is new again...

Just explained a “new” thread is just “old news” from last year... and, yes, we met STEVE last year!

I guess it is better than politics (or minutiae of fusion, lol, that people won’t follow).

Ah well, Happy Tequila Worm Moon tonight!!

ETA: I thought it was purple!’
edit on 19-3-2019 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: facts or something



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 10:18 PM
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Great Pictures ! I must have missed the last thread on STEVE but no surprise as I tend to miss most stuff unless I see it on the first page.. S&F



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 10:49 PM
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It looks more like a sally to me. Oh, maybe because it is an erect pole like object or something, I see now.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:05 PM
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originally posted by: a325nt
Very pretty.

The name irks me, though.

This planet was a blob of molten rock once- billions of years have passed since life formed.

This isn't new, it's just undocumented until now.


Maybe or maybe something completely different is happening to the planet now that has never happened before.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:50 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

I doubt it, they just included that stuff into the northern lights probably, they just discovered that it is different.

It is like scientists discovering a new type of lizard, they followed some native hauling one back to have an annual celebration carrying one on his shoulders. Evidently the natives have been eating this lizard for their celebrations going back many generations. It existed before it was discovered.



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

Amazing , I'm following the weather like for over two years now and it gets stranger by the day.

It's not only new kind of auroras seen in the skies but the weather patterns are completely nuts.

I'm amazed almost everyday when I'm on the road noticing something's happening and I can't find an answer what this could be, so most of the time I enjoy looking at it to temper my curiosity of wanting to know
edit on 0b30America/ChicagoWed, 20 Mar 2019 12:06:30 -0500vAmerica/ChicagoWed, 20 Mar 2019 12:06:30 -05001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
a reply to: SeaWorthy

I doubt it, they just included that stuff into the northern lights probably, they just discovered that it is different.

It is like scientists discovering a new type of lizard, they followed some native hauling one back to have an annual celebration carrying one on his shoulders. Evidently the natives have been eating this lizard for their celebrations going back many generations. It existed before it was discovered.


Look around, if i had time i would make you a list it is not just one thing happening. There are a ton of "never happened before in known History" things happening now!
Bizarre Particles Keep Flying out of Antarctica's Ice, and They Might Shatter Modern Physics
www.scientificamerican.com...

Mysterious Planet Wide Rumble May Have Come From the Largest Underwater Eruption Ever Recorded

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Magnetic North Pole Moving Faster Than Scientists Expected
learningenglish.voanews.com...

Watch this series


edit on 20-3-2019 by SeaWorthy because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

Yes. We are obtaining new sensing devices. Like SWARM, for example. The thing(s) that flew through Steve.

More and better data is good.


edit on 3/20/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: SeaWorthy

Yes. We are obtaining new sensing devices. Like SWARM, for example. The thing(s) that flew through Steve.

More and better data is good.



This is NOT what the scientists say they say this has not happened in all of recorded history, has never happened before and similar comments on many many areas of earth and space.
Of course People can believe what gives them the greatest sense of peace if they wish.



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy




This is NOT what the scientists say they say this has not happened in all of recorded history,
How would they know this if they didn't have the tools to detect it until recently?



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: Phage




How would they know this if they didn't have the tools to detect it until recently?


because it is something you can see with your eyes. I saw Steve here in the UK last year and knew right away it was something different.

Personally I think it is something to do with the military.



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: purplemer


I saw Steve here in the UK last year and knew right away it was something different.
I've heard the same thing said about persistent contrails. There are those who insist they did not exist before the 1990s.

But I was talking about SWARM being able to measure Steve. And the Antarctic cosmic rays. That sort of thing.



While this beautiful cousin to the aurora might be new to scientists, it's certainly not because it's a rare phenomenon.

"It turns out that Steve is actually remarkably common, but we hadn't noticed it before. It's thanks to ground-based observations, satellites, today's explosion of access to data and an army of citizen scientists joining forces to document it," says Donovan.

www.sciencealert.com...
edit on 3/20/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 06:19 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: SeaWorthy




This is NOT what the scientists say they say this has not happened in all of recorded history,
How would they know this if they didn't have the tools to detect it until recently?

For one written history, another is core samples from ice and land and seabed.
Changes in lava and magnetic rocks.



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: Phage




How would they know this if they didn't have the tools to detect it until recently?


I've done an extensive search within Wikipedia something I never posted but from the beginning of the ninetheen hundreds until now there seems to be an increase of natural disasters on earth and the variations of disasters also extended within a time frame of a century.

But the same answer popped up as you are saying nevertheless I still found it a remarkable fact
edit on 0b57America/ChicagoWed, 20 Mar 2019 18:42:57 -0500vAmerica/ChicagoWed, 20 Mar 2019 18:42:57 -05001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: 0bserver1

Natural disasters tend to have stronger impacts when there are more people. There are more people now than there were at the beginning of the 20th century.



posted on Mar, 20 2019 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: Phage

sounds logical, as of technology to measure I guess..?

To add: Somehow I do think the Schuman resonance could play a role in atmospheric events and the interaction between biological life and the earth itself in some way. But that's just guessing..
edit on 0b41America/ChicagoWed, 20 Mar 2019 18:54:41 -0500vAmerica/ChicagoWed, 20 Mar 2019 18:54:41 -05001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



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