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Huge meteor explosion over Earth last year went unnoticed until now

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posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 11:30 AM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
a reply to: SeaWorthy

But this confirms that the US government likely knew about it but kept it quite.


The Bering Sea explosion was also picked up by US government monitors that detect fireballs: their sensors pick up electromagnetic radiation in the form of infrared and visible light.




Did they keep it quiet?

This event was in fact previously detected and previously reported, so why are you assuming it was not the U.S. government who reported it after detecting it using their detection equipment?




posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: Box of Rain

All that was released to the public was raw data. It then took non-government scientists like Dr. Peter Brown about a year to processes all the data and see that there was a large explosion over the Bering Sea.

The sensors the data came from are used by the government (military?) and I bet this explosion was detected by them soon after it happened. They kept quite about it (not saying that's a bad thing). If not for people like Dr. Peter Brown investigating the raw data, the public would of never known about the Bering sea meteor.



posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 06:57 PM
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I also remember it being talked about very briefly on MSM, as of it wasn’t that big of a deal. If I recall the military spent about a day checking the area out and said “nothing to see here”. a reply to: Baddogma



posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 11:35 PM
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originally posted by: cpnorrisjr3
I also remember it being talked about very briefly on MSM, as of it wasn’t that big of a deal. If I recall the military spent about a day checking the area out and said “nothing to see here”. a reply to: Baddogma


It's not a big deal. All you'd see is a nice fireball and smoke trail in the sky, and hear a loud boom. It would have probably smashed some windows if it occured over a city. And that's it. Impact like that probably happen every few years.
edit on 17-3-2019 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 12:27 AM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
a reply to: charlyv

Fossils only appear when the right conditions are met, so I don't find it strange that we haven't found (yet) fossils that show victims of an event like that.


I agree that fossilization requires the right conditions, but all those years.... especially with scientists digging in the stratigraphic layers of certain soot depositing events. Perhaps soon enough.



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 11:40 AM
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BBC posted this, giving some additional info: www.bbc.co.uk...

At about noon local time on 18 December, the asteroid barrelled through the atmosphere at a speed of 32km/s (20 miles per second) , on a steep trajectory of seven degrees.

Measuring several metres in size, the space rock exploded 25.6km above the Earth's surface, with an impact energy of 173 kilotons.


Had a go using an "asteroid impact calculator", with the following results: Click
edit on 18-3-2019 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

These types of explosions are actually more common that most people think.

I think they are intentionally kept hush-hush whenever possible. Ever heard of the Brazillian Tunguska?

Are there any other ATS members who remember how there was a string of unusually large fireballs and explosions all across the world for about a week after Chelyabinsk in 2013??? Reports were coming in from everywhere about it.

I saw a thread last year about a meteor explosion over Iraq that was briefly mistaken for a nuke.
And now the Bering Sea.

That's the answer folks. They are much more common than you think.

-Driver



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 11:43 PM
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originally posted by: Z32Driver
a reply to: LookingAtMars

These types of explosions are actually more common that most people think.

I think they are intentionally kept hush-hush whenever possible. Ever heard of the Brazillian Tunguska?

Are there any other ATS members who remember how there was a string of unusually large fireballs and explosions all across the world for about a week after Chelyabinsk in 2013??? Reports were coming in from everywhere about it.

I saw a thread last year about a meteor explosion over Iraq that was briefly mistaken for a nuke.
And now the Bering Sea.

That's the answer folks. They are much more common than you think.

-Driver

They are common, but they're not kept hush hush. And they haven't become more frequent for some reason, it's just that we have a better system for detecting them, and people will report stuff like that on the Internet right away. The reason we hadn't heard of Brazilian Tunguska is because it (allegedly) took place in 1930 and is based on very sketchy witness accounts.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:20 AM
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The impact might have actually been spotted in satellite images: www.youtube.com...




posted on Mar, 25 2019 @ 12:36 PM
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A view from NASA's Terra satellite: www2.physics.ox.ac.uk...

P.S. moderators, I propose that this thread is moved to Space & Space Exploration sub-forum.



posted on Mar, 25 2019 @ 06:59 PM
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Wonder if they were filming Deadliest Catch at the time?
May have been caught on camera by them.



posted on Mar, 25 2019 @ 10:39 PM
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a reply to: UKWO1Phot

Uh, that is a huge body of water!!

Planes crash in there and they have thousands of square miles to be searched. Same with boats.

The area on the map looks like Russia, not U!S!A! But when it comes to fishing the zones don’t matter much.

The AK crab fishing boats are closer to Alaska (by St. Lawrence Island and north). Not sure how Kamchatka does things! But am pretty sure that they would not like a 38’ fishing boat in their waters stealing their king crab (huh? I don’t know the Russian woard for ‘crab’!! You learn something new everyday!)

Christmas is not really King Crab Season but with “global warming”, who knows??



posted on Mar, 25 2019 @ 11:35 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF




Christmas is not really King Crab Season but with “global warming”, who knows??

Winter is when crabbing is done. However, quotas keep the actual season quite short.

The event was quite far to the west, however.


edit on 3/25/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)







 
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