It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Massachusetts mayor recalled -- and re-elected -- amid federal indictments

page: 1
11

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 05:07 AM
link   
Strange turn of events in a place called Fall River, Massachusetts.

The Mayor there is tied up in some corruption charges so voters wanted a recall.

Voters recalled Mayor Jasiel Correia but also re-elected him as his own successor at the same time !!! wtf 🤣

Of course Correia is a Democrat.

Can only imagine the brainwashing curse that plagues that City eh 😆

Must have something to do with an old and famous murder case there way back in 1892 😆



Massachusetts mayor recalled -- and re-elected -- amid federal indictments

An embattled Democratic mayor from Massachusetts was re-elected on Tuesday, the same night that voters recalled him from duty amid federal indictments.

Mayor Jasiel Correia, 27, faced a recall vote after refusing to step down last year when he was charged with filing false tax returns and stealing $231,447 from investors to fund a lavish lifestyle.

The recall ballot contained two questions: whether Correia should be recalled and who among five candidates, including the embattled Democrat, should become the new mayor of Fall River. Voters were able to choose any mayoral candidate regardless of how they voted on the recall question.


"Are they nuts or is it something else?"




posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 05:46 AM
link   


Stealing $231,447 from investors to fund a lavish lifestyle.


Maybe he took mayoring lessons from Kwame Kilpatrick?



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 06:26 AM
link   
Something in the water, maybe-

Or maybe someone in the vote counting booth....



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 08:29 AM
link   
This seems very strange to me. Wouldn't they normally have a recall vote and then do a special election after if the recall went through? Why were both questions on the same ballot? If anything, I would think the 2nd question should have been for an interim mayor until another election could be held.

Mostly though, I'm just confused by people in general.

"Do you think Correia should be recalled?"

"Yes"

"Who should replace him?"

"Correia"

WTF?



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 11:37 AM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen

Since you always put party before country, here's the recent Republican list:

General David Petraeus (R)[2] Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. On April 23, 2015, a federal judge sentenced Petraeus to two years' probation plus a fine of $100,000 for providing classified information to Lieutenant Colonel Paula Broadwell. (2015)[3]

Steve Stockman (R-TX) was convicted of fraud. (2018)[4]

Dennis Hastert (R-IL) Speaker of the United States House of Representatives pleaded guilty in court for illegally structuring bank transactions related to payment of $3.5 million to quash allegations of sexual misconduct with a student when he was a high school teacher and coach decades ago.[10] (2016)

Michael Grimm (R-NY) pleaded guilty of felony tax evasion. This was the fourth count in a 20-count indictment brought against him for improper use of campaign funds. The guilty plea had a maximum sentence of three years; he was sentenced to eight months in prison. (2015)[11][12]

Trey Radel (R-FL) was convicted of possession of coc aine in November 2013. As a first-time offender, he was sentenced to one year probation and fined $250. Radel announced he would take a leave of absence, but did not resign. Later, under pressure from a number of Republican leaders, he announced through a spokesperson that he would resign. (2013)[13][14][15]
Rick Renzi (R-AZ) was found guilty on 17 of 32 counts against him June 12, 2013, including wire fraud, conspiracy, extortion, racketeering, money laundering and making false statements to insurance regulators. (2013)[16]

Mark E. Fuller (R) Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Alabama, was found guilty of domestic violence and sentenced to 24 weeks of family and domestic training and forced to resign his position. (2015)[20][21][22]

Scott Bloch (R) United States Special Counsel, pleaded guilty to criminal contempt of Congress for "willfully and unlawfully withholding pertinent information from a House Committee investigating his decision to have several government computers wiped...."[23][24] Bloch was sentenced to one day in jail and two years' probation, and also ordered him to pay a $5,000 fine and perform 200 hours of community service. (2013)[25]

Felipe Sixto (R) Special Assistant for Intergovernmental Affairs, convicted of misusing money. Sentenced to 30 months. (2009)[26]
Robert E. Coughlin (R) Deputy Chief of Staff for the Criminal Division, pleaded guilty to accepting bribes relating to the Jack Abramoff Indian lobbying scandal. (2009)[27]

David Safavian (R) Administrator for the Office of Management and Budget[28][29][30] He was found guilty of blocking justice and lying,[31] and sentenced to 18 months. (2008)[32][33]

Scooter Libby (R) Chief of Staff to Vice President Dick Cheney (R). 'Scooter' was convicted of perjury and obstruction of justice in the Plame Affair on March 6, 2007 and was sentenced to 30 months in prison and fined $250,000. His sentence was commuted by George W. Bush (R) on July 1, 2007. (2007)[34] Libby was pardoned by President Donald Trump on April 13, 2018.[35]
Lester Crawford (R) Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, pleaded guilty to conflict of interest and received 3 years suspended sentence and fined $90,000. (2006)[36]

Claude Allen (R) Director of the Domestic Policy Council, was arrested for a series of felony thefts in retail stores. He was convicted on one count (2006).[37]
John Korsmo (R) Chairman of the Federal Housing Finance Board, pleaded guilty to lying to congress. (2005)[27]

Can we just agree corruption is bad and we should ALL live by the rule of law? Do we have any common ground here?



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 11:58 AM
link   
a reply to: dfnj2015

But whatabout??? lol 😆

Fall River has many axes to grind 😆


p.s. you forgot Marion Barry and William Jefferson roflmao



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 02:14 PM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen

Interesting, the mayor here in Allentown, Pa. Ed Pawlowski , was sentenced on federal charges. Deputy mayor took over and special election held. A month later. Not sure how different states or cities rules differ.



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 08:25 PM
link   

The recall ballot contained two questions: whether Correia should be recalled and who among five candidates, including the embattled Democrat, should become the new mayor of Fall River. Voters were able to choose any mayoral candidate regardless of how they voted on the recall question. 


Logically it sounds like the current outcome was the statisticaly lickly outcome.

Assuming the recall vote was not approved in a land slide ... all those people who voted not to recall would have also voted Correia as the next mayor. All the Yes to recall ballots would than have to split among 4 other candidates; ... how could anyone of them gain enough support to beat Correia under those conditions?

Who ever thought up this baliting scheme is ether corrupt or stupid.



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 11:16 PM
link   
a reply to: DanDanDat


I never even thought about it like that. That makes more sense now for how the vote went down the way it did. Like you said though, that just makes it sound more corrupt. You really can't make this # up.



new topics




 
11

log in

join