It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NASA, Budgets, Orion and the Gateway

page: 2
13
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 16 2019 @ 02:11 AM
link   

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: BrianFlanders




Is there anything that can be done in space cheaper than it can on earth?


Manufacturing.

Not so much manufacturing, as it will cost extra money and time to get the equipment and resources up there. Space, with its vacuum and weightlessness (or low gravity on the Moon) makes it easier to launch spacecraft into deep space. You don't have to fight against the Earth's gravity and plough through its thick atmosphere on your way up.

That's why it's suggested to assemble interplanetary spacecraft and space stations in Moon orbit, and then use much less fuel to send them on their way.
edit on 16-3-2019 by wildespace because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 16 2019 @ 09:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: BrianFlanders




Is there anything that can be done in space cheaper than it can on earth?


Manufacturing.

Not so much manufacturing, as it will cost extra money and time to get the equipment and resources up there. Space, with its vacuum and weightlessness (or low gravity on the Moon) makes it easier to launch spacecraft into deep space. You don't have to fight against the Earth's gravity and plough through its thick atmosphere on your way up.

That's why it's suggested to assemble interplanetary spacecraft and space stations in Moon orbit, and then use much less fuel to send them on their way.


There is precedent for this: The United States followed-up wagon trains with trans-continental railroads that made colonizing the West Coast easier. This made it possible for Boeing, Northrup, Hughes and others to start-up aircraft companies out there. Mind you, no one could have predicted that that would have been the result, but it does go to show that though the benefits of exploration and colonization are unknown, the possible rewards are limitless.




posted on Apr, 12 2019 @ 06:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: lostbook


All I've been seeing is launches starting in the "2020s" (whatever that means). The NASA administrator says he wants boots on the lunar surface by 2028.

Lockheed is building a part (IIRC), as is Boeing. The thing will be shipped piece by piece over a bunch of flights which is one method to keep costs down (says universetoday). But no time line as to when construction begins except the "2020s"

Which if you think about it, is next year!

I'll look around some more... see if I can find anything out about how long it will take (they have module specs up at their website! The thing is huge!)


Thanks. Hopefully, NASA is serious about this project and follows it through to completion. I will keep an eye out.



 
13
<< 1   >>

log in

join