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Mars Anomaly...Again!

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posted on Mar, 16 2019 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: UnderKingsPeak

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: All Seeing Eye

The creative coloration helps direct the eye and stir the imagination. Doesn't it?



Armap's stereo version is also instructive. That "handle" really is not a continuation of the same rock. But coloring it as if it is, is fun.

Looks like a cartoon dog was run over.


It sure does, I bet his name was rover


It is amazing how many different things can be seen on Mars.




posted on Mar, 16 2019 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Pluto.

His name was Pluto.

Which brings up the eternal question, why is it that Goofy could talk but Pluto could not?



posted on Mar, 16 2019 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Goofy seemed like Pluto after two divorces
and a drinking problem.
But yeah why no speak Pluto ?



posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: All Seeing Eye




For instance, the "Glass Tubes" that are seen can actually be a biological organism
Only if you ignore better imagery.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



As far as tree's on Mars we have something that resembles tree's
Only if you ignore better imagery. And the apostrophe is improper.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



Until we put boots on the ground, anything is possible
It's not possible for liquid water to exist on the surface of Mars unless it is very, very "salty." It is a very dry and cold place.


And lets not forget this "Meteorite"
That has no visible characteristics which would suggest that it is a meteorite?


The Summer temp can reach 70 Deg. If I'm not mistaken, water can and does start to melt at 32 deg. It is possible for liquid water to be present on Mars.

Photographs of very beautiful Sand Dunes are no substitute for the "Glass Tube" formations. The characteristics are absolutely dissimilar.

If what I called a "Meteorite" stuck up in that corner does not have the characteristics of a Meteor, then please share your opinion as to what characteristics are present. Would you go so far as to say it might be, oh, I don't know, Biological in nature?



posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 09:12 AM
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its 70 deg below zero
a reply to: All Seeing Eye



posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 09:39 AM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles
its 70 deg below zero
a reply to: All Seeing Eye




Mars is much colder than Earth, in large part due to its greater distance from the sun. The average temperature is about minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 60 degrees Celsius), although it can vary from minus 195 F (minus 125 C) near the poles during the winter to as much as 70 F (20 C) at midday near the equator.
There is no minus before the 70. That translates to 70 deg, above freezing.

www.space.com...



posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles
its 70 deg below zero
a reply to: All Seeing Eye

And yes, I Understand it. I don't agree completely, but I do understand.



posted on Mar, 17 2019 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
The Summer temp can reach 70 Deg. If I'm not mistaken, water can and does start to melt at 32 deg. It is possible for liquid water to be present on Mars.

The problem is the atmospheric pressure. Like a pressure cooker, by using a higher pressure, elevates the temperature at which the water boils, the lack of pressure makes the temperature at which the water boils lower. Before the invention of practical altimeters, the explorers used the time a specific amount of water took to reach the boiling point as an indication of altitude.

On Mars, as the atmospheric pressure is too low, water boils at a very low temperature, so when the temperature becomes higher than the freezing point water turns directly into vapour instead of liquid.

As salt content rises the boiling point of water, water with high concentration of salts can exist on Mars' surface.


Photographs of very beautiful Sand Dunes are no substitute for the "Glass Tube" formations. The characteristics are absolutely dissimilar.

Here's the latest (as far as I know) photo from that area.


If what I called a "Meteorite" stuck up in that corner does not have the characteristics of a Meteor, then please share your opinion as to what characteristics are present. Would you go so far as to say it might be, oh, I don't know, Biological in nature?

Eolic erosion does strange things to rocks.


edit on 18/3/2019 by ArMaP because: link corrected



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 07:45 AM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
The Summer temp can reach 70 Deg. If I'm not mistaken, water can and does start to melt at 32 deg. It is possible for liquid water to be present on Mars.

The problem is the atmospheric pressure. Like a pressure cooker, by using a higher pressure, elevates the temperature at which the water boils, the lack of pressure makes the temperature at which the water boils lower. Before the invention of practical altimeters, the explorers used the time a specific amount of water took to reach the boiling point as an indication of altitude.

On Mars, as the atmospheric pressure is too low, water boils at a very low temperature, so when the temperature becomes higher than the freezing point water turns directly into vapour instead of liquid.

As salt content rises the boiling point of water, water with high concentration of salts can exist on Mars' surface.


Photographs of very beautiful Sand Dunes are no substitute for the "Glass Tube" formations. The characteristics are absolutely dissimilar.

[url=http://viewer.mars.asu.edu/planetview/inst/hirise/ESP_013137_2190_RED#P=ESP_013137_2190_RED&T=29Here[/url]'s the latest (as far as I know) photo from that area.


If what I called a "Meteorite" stuck up in that corner does not have the characteristics of a Meteor, then please share your opinion as to what characteristics are present. Would you go so far as to say it might be, oh, I don't know, Biological in nature?

Eolic erosion does strange things to rocks.



On Mars, as the atmospheric pressure is too low, water boils at a very low temperature, so when the temperature becomes higher than the freezing point water turns directly into vapour instead of liquid.


I cant argue against a very thin, light atmosphere, because that is what is there. Many Scientist, though, have come to the conclusion that Mars once had running water, and I agree with them.

Translated, that means that Mars had at one time a Atmosphere that was heavy enough to support standing water.

So, how much water will it take to "vaporize" , to increase the weight of the atmosphere to the point where water would not "Boil off" but remain as liquid, or frozen?


Eolic erosion does strange things to rocks
So does water erosion. But is that what we are looking at? I doubt it.



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 01:28 PM
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Since I first saw the face and nearby maybe structures at Cydonia I was open to the idea that Mars had some intelligent critters upon it, somewhen. When the clearer face pics came out, I still thought it looked possibly artificial, but damaged.

Then I saw the evenly spaced light rocks around the perimeter of the Mars' Face and I became really interested.

I've paid attention to the claims and saw some things I had to admit looked artificial and some areas that sure looked doctored to cover something up... which seriously impacted my youthfully naive NASA/JPL hero worship.

As far as possibly doctored to hide something, this pic examined in the vid below comes to mind, though the vid is not the best it's the first the search brought up...



Brandenburg's hypothesis about past nukes on Mars seems to hold water as well.

All in all, Mars is veeery interesting... beyond it being another planet, that is.

If there is suppression of information, then I wish the folks who happen to be sitting at the choke points of info were... better.



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 01:57 PM
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its - 70 deg Celsius
a reply to: All Seeing Eye



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 02:00 PM
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You are right, although even on earth to some extent, ice does sublimate
a reply to: ArMaP



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles
its - 70 deg Celsius
a reply to: All Seeing Eye




Mars is much colder than Earth, in large part due to its greater distance from the sun. The average temperature is about minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 60 degrees Celsius), although it can vary from minus 195 F (minus 125 C) near the poles during the winter to as much as 70 F (20 C) at midday near the equator.

www.space.com...

Again, it is quoted as 70 deg F, and 20 Deg Cel. at the Equator, during the Summer. From this point your argument must go to Space.com



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: All Seeing Eye

It reaches that temperature at the equator at mid-day sometimes. Not so much at night. It would have to be some very special trees to survive that environment. Like those trees in Antarctica, perhaps.

edit on 3/18/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 04:38 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: All Seeing Eye

It reaches that temperature at the equator at mid-day sometimes. Not so much at night. It would have to be some very special trees to survive that environment. Like those trees in Antarctica, perhaps.


No, how about the ones in Alaska and Siberia. That would be a good starting point. It would be onehellofa science project.



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: All Seeing Eye

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: All Seeing Eye

It reaches that temperature at the equator at mid-day sometimes. Not so much at night. It would have to be some very special trees to survive that environment. Like those trees in Antarctica, perhaps.


No, how about the ones in Alaska and Siberia. That would be a good starting point. It would be onehellofa science project.

If I was super-wealthy I might want to get in on the terraforming game. I like the idea of airships floating around in the high atmosphere of Venus releasing genetically modified bacteria that would eat sulfur and excrete water. Cool that planet down a little. I like the idea of dropping some dark lichen on the equator of Mars to see how it might warm things up. But I would certainly be hated by the scientific community, which would rather keep the planets uncontaminated by Earth bugs to they might be able to find something indigenous. But realistically, that ain't gonna happen, so we might as well get a start on making those planets more habitable, because it'll take a long, long time. Hopefully our species will be alive long enough to benefit.



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 04:49 PM
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originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
I cant argue against a very thin, light atmosphere, because that is what is there. Many Scientist, though, have come to the conclusion that Mars once had running water, and I agree with them.

I also agree that there was running water, we can see many signs of that even on satellite images.


Translated, that means that Mars had at one time a Atmosphere that was heavy enough to support standing water.

I agree.


So, how much water will it take to "vaporize" , to increase the weight of the atmosphere to the point where water would not "Boil off" but remain as liquid, or frozen?

I don't know and I don't think anyone knows, as the weight of the atmosphere would depend on its composition, and we don't know what that was back then.


So does water erosion. But is that what we are looking at? I doubt it.

I think we are looking are the results of eolic erosion, not water erosion.

Here are some more examples from Antarctica.


Source



Source



Source



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: All Seeing Eye




That would be a good starting point.
Yeah. If the temperatures where those trees grow stayed as low as they do in Antartica. And if they were as dry.

edit on 3/18/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 05:30 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
I cant argue against a very thin, light atmosphere, because that is what is there. Many Scientist, though, have come to the conclusion that Mars once had running water, and I agree with them.

I also agree that there was running water, we can see many signs of that even on satellite images.


Translated, that means that Mars had at one time a Atmosphere that was heavy enough to support standing water.

I agree.


So, how much water will it take to "vaporize" , to increase the weight of the atmosphere to the point where water would not "Boil off" but remain as liquid, or frozen?

I don't know and I don't think anyone knows, as the weight of the atmosphere would depend on its composition, and we don't know what that was back then.


So does water erosion. But is that what we are looking at? I doubt it.

I think we are looking are the results of eolic erosion, not water erosion.

Here are some more examples from Antarctica.


Source



Source



Source


Please look again, in comparison.
www.rt.com...
This "Object" is not out in the wind. It is nestled in a shielded crevice. Very little if any wind action can be seen in the surrounding surfaces. Logic dictates, not wild imaginations.

Though, I do not believe it to be presently alive, I wouldn't exclude the possibility that it is petrified, or more like Freeze dried. LOL

edit on PMMondayMonday thAmerica/ChicagoAmerica/Chicago3235 by All Seeing Eye because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2019 @ 05:36 PM
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originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
Please look again, in comparison.
www.rt.com...
This "Object" is not out in the wind. It is nestled in a shielded crevice. Very little if any wind action can be seen in the surrounding surfaces. Logic dictates, not wild imaginations.

I didn't know we were talking about that photo.




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