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Another 737 MAX-8 down

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posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I have no idea whether the aircraft is safe or that Boeing built a bad craft. I hope they didn’t. But caution is in order since human lives are involved. It’s just that simple. We all hope soon they’ll come out and say all is okay




posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

If the Lion Air crash is due to bad maintenance and this one is not the fault of Boeings do you think the media will issue an apology? I highly doubt it.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I'm happy to be proven wrong but I'm not sure there is a recorded case of a gear retracted tyre explosion on the 737. The 737 is specifically designed with a frangible hydraulic fuse plug that pokes out near the edge of the main gear doors about 3/4" and is usually red or white in colour. If a piece of spinning shredded tyre strikes it they rupture and the fuse causes a run around circuit to prevent gear retraction. Its something apprentices get warned about not hitting with stands, tools, heads etc. The whole point being that the main gear bay on a 737 is filled with hydraulics, flight control system cable runs and wiring harnesses and is much more vulnerable to damage than a more modern design like the A320. Therefore it needs this additional protection measure, which seems to work well.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 06:26 PM
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Fox News just mentioned an "anonymous" database where pilots have been complaining about issues with the Max 8 for months. I didn't catch all of it and I don't have DVR. Did anyone else catch it?



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: TheGoondockSaint

I watched it, they seemed to be talking about a new news report in the Dallas morning news, this one I believe...

www.dallasnews.com...
edit on 12-3-2019 by ausername because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 06:37 PM
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The list of countries banning this aircraft is insane now, apparently only the USA and Canada are still allowing them to operate.

Hysteria or legitimate concerns?

Wow



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 08:57 PM
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a reply to: thebozeian

Honestly, I'd be far more worried about a tire or brake fire in the well than a tire exploding in it. If a tire went up it would burn hot and pretty fast, right through everything around it.
edit on 3/13/2019 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 09:11 PM
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Boeing publicly released details about the planned 737 MAX software update on its website late Monday.

A company spokesman confirmed the update would use feeds from multiple sensors in the MAX’s stall-prevention system—instead of the current reliance on a single sensor.

The change was prompted by preliminary results from the Indonesian crash investigation indicating that erroneous data from a single sensor, which measures the angle of the plane’s nose, caused the stall-prevention system to misfire. Then, a series of events put the aircraft into a dangerous dive.

Link



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 09:32 PM
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a reply to: ausername

We'll know when we get the preliminary recorder report.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 09:34 PM
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TL DR: -discovered it's the older version of the plane.-

I actually flew on one of these Monday going from Chicago to Austin it was an American Airline flight. I actually looked up the flight to make sure it wasn't one of these planes but the flight got changed at the airport. I didn't think anything of it but I looked up the flight info on a website I found ( flightaware.com... ) where you can check past flights and sure enough, it was a 737-800 the only reason I mention this is because the crazy thing is during take off the plane was struggling big time more so than I had ever experienced before in fact that's the only reason I wanted to double check If I was on one of these planes I originally chalked it up to the wind conditions in Chicago it's known for being the windy city for a reason and that might of very well of been the case... But right after take off the plane had several sudden drops it really seemed like it was struggling to gain altitude especially early on never been on a plane that dropped so violently right off the bat, it kept dropping and shaking so violently both the people on each side of me grabbed onto the seat in front of them. After it reached its cruising altitude it was a normal flight but the take off was quite scary, most likely just air gust in that region I have only ever flew out of Chicago once before but interesting nonetheless.


-EDIT discovered it's the older version of the plane.-
edit on 12-3-2019 by animatorsteve because: new info



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: animatorsteve

I think the 737-800 is different to the max 8. Just sounds like normal turbulence you experienced.
edit on 12-3-2019 by Woody510 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

Ah, you are right it's the older version I guess it was just a shaky take-off.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 09:59 PM
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They want to make them go faster and bigger and better before anyone else does....could care less what happens.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: animatorsteve

I think you described the bit I hate most about flying where they reduce engine power after take off and you feel a bit of a dip or fall in altitude.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 10:00 PM
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originally posted by: Jobeycool
They want to make them go faster and bigger and better before anyone else does....could care less what happens.

They're not doing any faster than they did 40 years ago not that much bigger either!!!



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 10:06 PM
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originally posted by: Woody510

originally posted by: Jobeycool
They want to make them go faster and bigger and better before anyone else does....could care less what happens.

They're not doing any faster than they did 40 years ago not that much bigger either!!!
Well maybe more luxurious or something.....Maybe bad models or just your how your suppose to die if you travel by plane..



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 10:25 PM
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a reply to: Jobeycool

They're actually adding more seats by reducing seat pitch on most aircraft. The Max also includes a smaller lavatory.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: animatorsteve

The 737 numbering system can be confusing. The NG version, which is the older version that is still operated everywhere but a few remote areas, includes the -700, -800, and -900. The biggest differences are fuselage length, and originally the -900 had a split winglet, although those are being retrofitted on older aircraft.

The Max series includes the Max 7, Max 8, Max 9, and Max 10. The 10 is actually so long that they had to design an entirely new landing gear so that they had enough fuselage clearance on takeoff and landing. And then you get into airline and ICAO codes, which adds even more fun.



posted on Mar, 12 2019 @ 11:37 PM
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The wrangling over the recorders has begun. The US is lobbying to have them sent here for the NTSB to read them, while Ethiopian investigators want to send them to the UK for the AAIB to read them.



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 07:09 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
The AAIB is more than competent to read them, hell they wrote the original book on how to conduct an air accident investigation with the Comet I. I am concerned about whether the NTSB will be allowed to be wholly impartial on this. The list of countries that have now banned flight by the MAX family temporarily is only overshadowed by why the US and Canada haven't. Something is seriously wrong here, either people are panicking about nothing in at least 20 countries, or there is some serious BS being put out by Boeing and/or US authorities. I vote the UK AAIB be allowed to investigate to allow professional impartiality to judge what actually happened. If need be they can refer to others for a second or third opinion. Nobody needs this to be covered up or cause an unnecessary panic. Time is of the essence here if credibility in commercial aviation is to be maintained.



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