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Another 737 MAX-8 down

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posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Control surface actuator rubbing through the leads.
Oscillation induced structural failure.
Bad connectors.
Poor maintenance, connectors not fastened properly.
Component mount failure.
Wire conductor breaking from flexing.
..............................etc.




posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

All possible, but on an airframe this young I wouldn't expect it, unless something was really screwed up during construction.



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 03:15 PM
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FDR image tweeted by the BEA.




posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
FDR image tweeted by the BEA.



G'ZUS that hit hard😔

There are still a handful of Max 8's flying right now. Was the grounding mandatory or voluntary?


Thanks for keeping up on this thread. I've many questions that I can't ask correctly.. and same goes to other's here too.



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: JIMC5499

Yes. The question then becomes, why. Simply going from nose up to nose down shouldn't put that much strain on the aircraft.


Depends. Airspeed, buffeting, etc would all be potential variables at play along with the pitch down.



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 03:54 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

Ferry flights. The grounding allows for crew only movement of the aircraft to allow the airlines to relocate them, usually to a hub from a remote location. American moved five earlier with four going to Tulsa, and one out of Cancun to Phoenix.
edit on 3/14/2019 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Satellite Data Shows Similarities of both Max 8 Crashes

I'm beyond busy these days with work, but didn't know if anyone had mentioned this or seen this? I believe the original article was a Bloomberg article, but the gist is that this data was part of what spurred the FAA etc. to recommend the grounding after all...

Wondering what all of you experts think?



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 03:58 PM
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According to the BBC these could be grounded until at least May?


All Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 aircraft will remain grounded at least until May after the fatal Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has said. The aircraft will not fly until a software update can be tested and installed, the US regulator said.


www.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 04:01 PM
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a reply to: SonOfThor

Yeah, I posted an image of the vertical speed showing the similarities. The issue I have is that while it's superficially similar, the Lion Air transponder cut out at less than 500 feet, with the aircraft in a vertical dive. The Ethiopian transponder cut out showing 8200 feet (the airfield was at 7200 feet), while the aircraft was in a 2400 fpm climb.



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: solidshot

They're expected to roll out the software update by the end of the month, or start of April. They'll probably allow them to fly again as they undergo the update.



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 04:32 PM
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originally posted by: solidshot
According to the BBC these could be grounded until at least May?

www.bbc.co.uk...


This is going to be an "all hands on deck" moment for Boeing. I'd bet every single person with FCS experience on Boeing's commercial side (and probably some key people at Boeing Defense) are going to drop what they are currently working on and start digging into this. They're going to try to replicate it every way possible, and start a rewrite that leads to less automation in the FCS and requires more manual control/oversight. It's going to be decided that letting inexperienced pilots auger in is less of a liability than an FCS that potentially automatically puts those inexperienced pilots behind the eight-ball relying on their inexperience to recognize, diagnose, and fix the problem.


But this will be priority AAA for the company to push out a solution ASAP. Carriers are losing money every hour the MAX sits on the ground. Boeing is losing prestige. They can't fix this fast enough from the Boeing point of view.
edit on 14-3-2019 by RadioRobert because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 05:12 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Bigburgh

Ferry flights. The grounding allows for crew only movement of the aircraft to allow the airlines to relocate them, usually to a hub from a remote location. American moved five earlier with four going to Tulsa, and one out of Cancun to Phoenix.


Ahhh, that makes sense now.
Just now:


Hence no gate or baggage belt assignments:


Thank again



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 10:46 PM
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Damn..
I figured Zaphod would ask me a question..

In which I'd say....

I have no GOSH DAMN clue!!! ( VERY true )

Do we have a coherent answer yet?

Is France close Yet?



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

The recorders arrived this afternoon, they were planning to begin the technical work tomorrow, so either this weekend or first of the week we'll hear something.



posted on Mar, 14 2019 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Bigburgh

The recorders arrived this afternoon, they were planning to begin the technical work tomorrow, so either this weekend or first of the week we'll hear something.


Of course I want answers now. (Nodding my head forward and back)
Ok, being patient. It's the best we could ask for.


Edit: F117 debuted in the last month... anyone going to say a word? Or do we all live under a rock? Sammish and another guy broke the story a year or 2 ago... can we start a thread on this in the meantime?🙄



posted on Mar, 15 2019 @ 12:03 AM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

We already have one. And the other guy would be me.



posted on Mar, 15 2019 @ 04:10 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Bigburgh

The recorders arrived this afternoon, they were planning to begin the technical work tomorrow, so either this weekend or first of the week we'll hear something.
Lets wait and watch



posted on Mar, 15 2019 @ 07:10 AM
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Set to dive.

www.bloomberg.com...



posted on Mar, 15 2019 @ 07:36 AM
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They used a word that jumped at me with the 2nd plane. when the fix has been "certified" or something. That's a word a cryptographer could almost use. Is it vulnerable to EM attack? maybe

About the that up and down flight path... if we assume the pilot isn't controlling the plane, then autopilot is another possible navigator. You wouldn't think so because it's so erratic - but if the autopilot's algorithm was self correcting with too high of a gain... then it could produce that crazy flight path (WITH just the right range of initial conditions).

So far those are my favorite pet theories. this was the 2nd in a week so i'm also putting together the solar data



posted on Mar, 15 2019 @ 08:12 AM
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The sat environment data and the electron bombardment data for this morning is WAY off.

ftp.swpc.noaa.gov...

If you look at the electron data its spiking down to new lows for the week. So physically speaking, electrons just decided to stop hitting us in the same way that waves might stop hitting our feed on a sandy beach. What comes after that? Sometimes its a big #ing wave, so we might get a big electron storm. Take a look through the data if you want more precision - its there.

This sudden shift in EM environment would really jack up that navigational gear - and that's what the pilot in the last crash was reporting before he went out
edit on 15-3-2019 by twosquares because: more words




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