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The bible, mixing fabrics and synthetics today

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posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 08:24 PM
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I like cotton clothes. Wool keeps us warm in part because it has lanolin in it's structure, which lots of northern europeans have an allergy too, it makes you itch. The thing is, most people do have a reaction to it and that reaction creates histamine which actually causes a jump in energy production by the body. So it also increases our bodies ability to increase energy.

Some people overreact from wool because of it's histamine boosting chemistry. I do not know if the middle eastern people have an allergy to this, they have been using wool for thousands of years to make things so I think they probably do not react much anymore. Funny how an oil can trigger a reaction in many Europeans.

Wool does make me itchy if it is right against my skin, but the oil evaporates and goes through your clothes when you wear it over your clothes, but it does not make me itch much that way. Wonder why they put it into shampoo, it will surprise you if you read about it but I can't remember the particulars about it, I think the histamine actually stimulates blood flow to the scalp or something.




posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I hope you are not spending too much time out in the cold snow, because there is a saying: Cotton Kills.

It retains body moisture and can cause hypothermia.


edit on 6-3-2019 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 09:01 PM
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BPA is a component of nylon.

davidvielmetter.com...

PRODUCTS THAT CONTAIN BISPHENOL-A
Bisphenol-a or BPA is a monomer for polycarbonate plastic. It chemically reacts with other liquid chemicals (monomers) to produce molecules of polycarbonate or epoxies (solid polymers). This has been revised from my previous post after receiving Kevin’s kind update below. Unfortunately recent studies have shown that when plastic containers with BPA are heated or chilled, a significant amount of the chemical can leak into the contents of the container. Furthermore, studies have linked BPA to health problems ranging from from cancer to infertility and obesity.

So knowing all these things about BPA’s, what’s the best course of action? Throw away (um, recycle) all your plastic containers? As it turns out, manufacturers are already marking plastics containing BPA with specific recycling symbols. The chart below shows which of these recyclable plastic types are likely to contain BPA:

SYMBOL PLASTICS TYPE COMMON USE CONTAINS BPA?
PET POLYETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE (PET OR PETE) WATER BOTTLES INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE 16-20OZ WATER BOTTLES YOU CAN BUY IN BULK.MOST 16-20OZ & 2 LITER PLASTIC SODA BOTTLES NO
HDPE HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE MILK, DETERGENT & OIL BOTTLES. TOYS AND PLASTIC BAGS NO
PVC VINYL/POLYVINYL CHLORIDE (PVC) SOME FOOD WRAP, VEGETABLE OIL BOTTLES, BLISTER PACKAGES, SOME WATER PIPES, LININGS OF SOME CANS (SOMETIMES PET FOOD CANS). YES
LDPE LOW-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE SHRINK WRAP, DRY-CLEANING BAGS NO
PP POLYPROPYLENE REFRIGERATED CONTAINERS, SOME BAGS, MOST BOTTLE TOPS NO
PS POLYSTYRENE THROWAWAY UTENSILS, STYROFOAM CUPS, MEAT PACKAGING, PROTECTIVE PACKING NO
7-19 LAYERED MIXED PLASTICS ACRYLICS, POLYCARBONATES (DRINKING BOTTLES), POLYLACTIC ACID (BIO DEGRADEABLE PLASTIC CONTAINERS),NYLON AND FIBERGLASS YES
So there you have it. All the information to let you make an informed decision on what to chuck into the recycling bin.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 09:07 PM
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The Bible was written by people who were barely a step up from cavemen. Live your life and forget about that nonsense. You'll have plenty of other things to worry about before it's all said and done. And all of them will actually be real.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 09:12 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Many Bible superstitions have been proven to be silly superstitions by science over the last 200 years.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 09:59 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
a reply to: rickymouse

I hope you are not spending too much time out in the cold snow, because there is a saying: Cotton Kills.

It retains body moisture and can cause hypothermia.



Been using cotton clothes all my life. That wicking stuff is a sales pitch, multilayers actually is better with the outer layer being a little bit water resistant,

I blow snow with my bib overalls on and the tractor has a six and a half foot blower on it and no cab. I do have choppers and a chook and I do have a real good cardhart style jacket. but most times I just wear my tennis shoes with a single pair of socks. I have some moon boots, but I can't move those huge 15EEEE 70 below boots on the clutch and brake very well, there isn't much room for them. I will have three inches of snow on my lap and on my chook. The chook is a cotton blend too. I actually have shoveled for twenty minutes in my shorts out near the car a few times, if you take a shower and put a little epsom salts on your washcloth when cleaning up, it somehow helps you to stay warm in the cold. I guess it works by increasing energy near the skin. I did put my long johns on under my bibs twice this year when it was super cold, the bibs are not waterproof but I have not froze my legs yet.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 09:59 PM
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naked --> natural clothes --> synthetic clothes --> antiperspirant --> botox



posted on Mar, 7 2019 @ 12:28 AM
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Morgellons is a weird, weird thing.

I remember back when I was 15 or 16, I noticed a very odd hair-like thing sticking out of my shoulder. It was stiff and had the consistency and appearance of fishing line, but much thinner like a hair. I'd never had noticed it if I hadn't felt it sticking out with my fingers because it was so pale.

I pulled it out with tweezers and it was seriously like a short piece of fishing line, but much stiffer than hair. The strangest thing ever. It never came back and I never had one of these things crop up anywhere else.

Maybe it was the same thing Morgellons sufferers have. I don't know.



posted on Mar, 7 2019 @ 05:55 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: Malak777




Levi's should bring out some Hemp Jeans. They could do like a wicked green colour. Hemp would be a great cotton substitute. It could be organic too.


Forget Levi's, create your own company, I'll be your first customer.

I'm in!


Spot on. Current-production Levi's are junk; last two pairs I bought fell apart after two washings. And I'm not overly hard on clothing. I've got several pairs that are at least 15 years old and they're still holding up--albeit quite faded. The fabric Levi's uses today is lower thread count and thinner. It's also woven from thread that's not nearly as tightly twisted as the older stuff. I'm done with 'em.

You want great quality jeans at a really good price? Round House. Made in Oklahoma:
www.round-house.com...



posted on Mar, 7 2019 @ 10:09 PM
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The proscription against wearing linen and wool at the same time predates the Bible, it also predates The Covenant of Moses and if I remeber correctly it is part of The Covenant of Abraham.
I had to opportunity to watch a 3 hr lecture, given by very well known rabbinical scholar at UC Santa Cruz. It was predominantly about the development of the Hebrew culture(The Covenant of Abraham) through the birth of Judism(The Covenant of Moses).
The interesting thing about the Jewish holy texts is, they have been passed down through the ages so faithfully, that the hand of individual writers can still be seen when read in Hebrew.
Scholars can roughly date the passages by the words and structure used, they can even see regional dialects in the scrolls.
One very famous Old Testament passage, I don't remember which, when read in Hebrew shows that it is a composition of 2 versions of the story, written by two different people from different areas, separated by a couple hundred years.



posted on Mar, 9 2019 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm
God’s law to the people of Israel commanded: “You must not wear mixed stuff of wool and linen together.” (De 22:11; see also Le 19:19.) Regarding this, the Encyclopaedia Judaica (Jerusalem, 1973, Vol. 14, col. 1213) remarked: “The clothing of the priests was notably exempt from the prohibition of [sha·ʽat·nezʹ] [a garment of two sorts of thread, NW]. Exodus 28:6, 8, 15 and 39:29 prescribe that various pieces be made of linen and colored wool interwoven. . . . This suggests that the general prohibition was grounded on the taboo character of such a mixture, pertaining exclusively to the realm of the sacred.”

Among the Hebrews, most garments were either woolen or linen. (Le 13:47; Pr 31:13, 22; Ho 2:5, 9) A mixture of the two materials was prohibited by the Law for nonpriestly Israelite garments. (De 22:11)



posted on Mar, 10 2019 @ 02:46 PM
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originally posted by: BrianFlanders
The Bible was written by people who were barely a step up from cavemen. Live your life and forget about that nonsense. You'll have plenty of other things to worry about before it's all said and done. And all of them will actually be real.


Well those rules were in the old testament and applied to the Hebrews/jews alone. remember the bible is 2 seperate books. the part we are concerned with is the NT covenant not the one specified for the Hebrews/jews.

So The clothes thing does not effect us modern christians.



posted on Mar, 10 2019 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I like cotton clothes. Wool keeps us warm in part because it has lanolin in it's structure, which lots of northern europeans have an allergy too, it makes you itch. The thing is, most people do have a reaction to it and that reaction creates histamine which actually causes a jump in energy production by the body.


Just to set the record straight:

While raw wool does have lanolin on it, woolen cloth or yarn does not have lanolin in it; it gets washed out when the raw wool, yarn, or fabric is washed. (In fact, some wools need to have artificial oils added to them after washing and before they're spun, and then have that washed out too once they've become yarn.)

It's not lanolin that makes you itch, and it's a wonderful emolient (which is why you find it as an ingredient in so many skin-soothing products) — it's that wool has microscopic scales on each fiber, which is why you can make felt out of wool; the scales snap together and stick, making solid fabric. Wool comes in a huge variety of textures and while some wools (Lincoln, Suffolk, etc.) are extremely itchy (because the fibers are coarse), others (such as Merino) are much, much softer than cotton and could be worn against the most sensitive skin on your body without a problem (because the fibers are super-fine).

Of course, there probably are some rare people who have a wool allergy, but for the most part the itchiness comes from the coarseness of the fibers.

How do I know any of this? Because I'm a spinner and weaver and, in the past, a small-scale sheep farmer and fiber producer; I also spent many years as a massage therapist and used lanolin in specialist skin products of my own.




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