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Examining the Scottish kilt - the comforts and benefits & drawbacks

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posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 12:43 AM
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I didn't know where to post this, I guess it might have fit in "Health & Wellness"

While I've never worn a kilt and have often thought they seemed a little "unmanly" (purely due to cultural norms I'm sure - b/c of my culture/background) but I did think they might have many advantages in some situations possibly less encumbered movement of lower body, more air flow/circulation to the groin region (a great benefit in hot & humid areas I would think).

The closest I've come to experience this is wearing a bath towel (Xtra large, wraps around at least 2x at waist) after showering. The first time was b/c I had all my clothing in the wash while on vacation (so just towel, no underwear), so I was stuck in my room for about 3 hours in this condition - though I was also wearing a shirt.

I found that it was incredibly comfortable and much warmer than I had suspected. It was about 5-10F outside and I had to get a few things from my car (no neighbors near, so no big deal) and I was outside for about 10 mins and was probably warmer than had I been wearing pants & underwear not to mention it was actually incredibly comfortable. This blew my mind, I expected to have to run back inside often to warm up b/c I thought my thighs/groin would get very cold very quickly - but no such thing happened.

Now the towels I use are very plush, so they insulate well, especially at 2 layers, but I suspect not too much more than a thick woolen kilt, as the towel is cotton. The length would vary from just above knee, mid knee, to slightly below knee, depending on towel size and where I wrapped it.

I found this so comfortable that I would often choose to remain in the towel/"kilt" w/ shirt for the remainder of the nights when I shower and often fall asleep in it. It is more comfortable sleeping in this than either in underwear, underwear/pajamas or even naked.

It really was an odd thing to have realized and I'm wondering how many people never spend more than a few minutes with a towel like this after showering (living alone makes this less of an issue I'll admit) but it made me have a totally new respect for the Scot's and their kilts and all the benefits they have attributed to them over the years.

I will say the only thing I'm not crazy about is using the toilet (standing or sitting) while using this, but that could be due to the size of the towel & it's no big issue.

This has also made me think about the confinements of everyday clothing, especially in cold weather (underwear, long underwear, fleece/flannel lined pants) all of this is extremely constricting and confining and I've found that a nice pair of warm socks (long ones, mid shin or higher) and the towel to be warmer than the conventional items I mentioned. Granted I haven't spent prolonged periods in sub freezing conditions in this, but enough to realize there is something to this.

The constraint of pants makes me wonder why women complain so much about skirts and dresses (ok, dresses may be a little more confining in some ways) but I would think these types of dress would be much less confining and freeing. What is this about "repression of women" and "control" of them. Maybe it was all about comfort when it was designed for them, where men wore pants b/c they had to work in fields & industry where they needed the protection provided by enclosing the legs individually.

I suggest anyone try this after their next shower - maybe try sleeping in it (towel dries very fast while wearing it like this, or use a dry one) - it's a freeing experience, better than sleeping naked b/c you don't have the psychological feeling of nakedness while having the freeing feeling of it - it improved sleep & comfort for me at night.

Sorry for this odd post, but this site has lots of open minded people who might consider things like this instead of dismissing right off the bat.




posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 01:17 AM
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You do you.

As per the "complain so much about skirts and dresses;" I believe that is more so about past societal constants that the garments themselves.

For me, I am all about how one is comfortable. Coupled with what is comfortable for others in company.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 01:30 AM
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I’ve heard that the kilt was invented by an Englishman.
Asked a Scot about it once, never again.

His reaction was similar to what I imagine calling a black dude the N word would elicit minus the beatdown
edit on 6/3/2019 by IkNOwSTuff because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 01:32 AM
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Man, the quote option almost never works - I was trying to quote or reply to randomtangentsrme


I agree with the "comfort of others" aspect, but that is very subjective. I don't ever do this with people around.

So you think that the women't complaint about traditional dress is because they were expected to wear them other than comfort? Basically a "I'm doing this b/c you say I can't"? I can see that.

What I find odd is that in poor countries where women don't have brazier's /bra's most women opt to wear them if they can afford them - I've seen the women say it is a comfort thing (many with large breasts & being older, so maybe physiology greatly effects this). This is odd b/c other women say the bra is evil and meant to oppress women (bra burning). It seems there are people who complain just b/c they can or want attention - but when it effects people who want to wear one (for good reason - support - keeping bits-n-bob's in place) and they get attacked for being "traditionalists", that is not right.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 01:34 AM
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Do you know if it is still worn much in Scottland? Or is it basically just for traditional ceremony and such. I could see it being more prominent in rural areas (farms & highlands possibly?) but when I watch documentaries in Scotland I don't see them except in parades and such.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 01:37 AM
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originally posted by: DigginFoTroof
Man, the quote option almost never works - I was trying to quote or reply to randomtangentsrme


I agree with the "comfort of others" aspect, but that is very subjective. I don't ever do this with people around.

So you think that the women't complaint about traditional dress is because they were expected to wear them other than comfort? Basically a "I'm doing this b/c you say I can't"? I can see that.

What I find odd is that in poor countries where women don't have brazier's /bra's most women opt to wear them if they can afford them - I've seen the women say it is a comfort thing (many with large breasts & being older, so maybe physiology greatly effects this). This is odd b/c other women say the bra is evil and meant to oppress women (bra burning). It seems there are people who complain just b/c they can or want attention - but when it effects people who want to wear one (for good reason - support - keeping bits-n-bob's in place) and they get attacked for being "traditionalists", that is not right.


Ahhhh yes
The old patriarchal conspiracy to save big breasted woman from back ache and bad posture.

My theory on bra burning is that it’s just a tantrum by women who have small boobs, go back to the 70s and in all the bra burning pics you never see anyone with more than an A cup.

P.s the “quote” button works fine



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 01:56 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof
I was last there in the early 2000s, in the Glasgow-Sterling-Ayr region. There were certainly people in kilts there, but none of them wore them as every day attire.

I have never worn a kilt (well other than a mock toga for a party which is actually much like a "traditional" kilt), but have spent extended periods of time in a towel due to competitive swimming. Others seemed to like wearing the team issued sweat shirt/pants/windbreaker, but I always found that even in the wet conditions of a natatorium a nice towel was much more comfortable and regulated my body temperature much better.

edit on 6-3-2019 by dubiousatworst because: fix



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 01:56 AM
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originally posted by: DigginFoTroof
Man, the quote option almost never works - I was trying to quote or reply to randomtangentsrme


I agree with the "comfort of others" aspect, but that is very subjective. I don't ever do this with people around.

So you think that the women't complaint about traditional dress is because they were expected to wear them other than comfort? Basically a "I'm doing this b/c you say I can't"? I can see that.

What I find odd is that in poor countries where women don't have brazier's /bra's most women opt to wear them if they can afford them - I've seen the women say it is a comfort thing (many with large breasts & being older, so maybe physiology greatly effects this). This is odd b/c other women say the bra is evil and meant to oppress women (bra burning). It seems there are people who complain just b/c they can or want attention - but when it effects people who want to wear one (for good reason - support - keeping bits-n-bob's in place) and they get attacked for being "traditionalists", that is not right.


ATS did alert me to the quote. It's a fickle system on here.

My wife (by trade) is a carpenter. She enjoys the time she can spend in a dress or skirt. It is not her everyday apparel.

I think right now 'people' complain about everything traditional. We are in a major transitional period (at least in the USA) and have been for at least a decade.

As per the bra observations, I work at a college. I see a mix, but yes those who have greater mass tend to keep them constrained.
And no I'm not looking, nor are the students presenting.
Comfort again is the rule. As well as culture.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 02:04 AM
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originally posted by: DigginFoTroof
Do you know if it is still worn much in Scottland? Or is it basically just for traditional ceremony and such. I could see it being more prominent in rural areas (farms & highlands possibly?) but when I watch documentaries in Scotland I don't see them except in parades and such.


Formal events and rugby/football international games mainly.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 02:06 AM
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originally posted by: dubiousatworst
a reply to: DigginFoTroof
I was last there in the early 2000s, in the Glasgow-Sterling-Ayr region. There were certainly people in kilts there, but none of them wore them as every day attire.

I have never worn a kilt (well other than a mock toga for a party which is actually much like a "traditional" kilt), but have spent extended periods of time in a towel due to competitive swimming. Others seemed to like wearing the team issued sweat shirt/pants/windbreaker, but I always found that even in the wet conditions of a natatorium a nice towel was much more comfortable and regulated my body temperature much better.


This is EXACTLY what I found which is basically why I posted b/c it is so counter-intuitive. Granted hot air rises, which traps heat inside the towel/kilt, I just didn't think it would be more effective than sweat pants/ warm-ups. I actually tried this with a mylar "solar" blanket in addition to the towel, and it almost cooked me.


When you look back at how clothing has developed (for extreme conditions) it is interesting that many things which aren't intuitive are used b/c they have some unique effect, and we find more of them all the time, many of them are "knock offs" of what our ancestors knew centuries or millennia ago.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 03:19 AM
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Its really good for RUNNING LIKE HADES right after your big unfiltered yapper pisses someone bigger than you off...LMAO.....seriously I think they wore Kilts because they were on the run so much due to their oppositionally defiant natures.www.youtube.com...
edit on 6-3-2019 by one4all because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 03:47 AM
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I am a scotsman, born and bred and the kilt you speak of is just the modern kilt (as another modern kilt, the utili-kilt was invented by an American). The modern kilt was designed by an English Quaker and a Scottish businessman in Edinburgh as the great kilt his scottish workers wore was too bulky (a thick woolen plade wrapped twice around the waist then over the shoulder, this part was used as a cloak. This evolved from other, similar styles of dress, traditionally worn by the celts.)

Whoever you asked before was simply ignorant, you get those people the world over.
I wear a kilt on my birthday, for weddings and hogmanay (new years eve) and when invading england. And I also have a kilt I wear for fetish events and bike rallies.

I love how free you feel down below and it's far easier when going to the loo (especially at bike rallies where one tends to go with nature rather than use the cesspit portaloos)...
edit on 6/3/19 by djz3ro because: fix some woopsies



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 03:54 AM
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originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: DigginFoTroof
Do you know if it is still worn much in Scottland? Or is it basically just for traditional ceremony and such. I could see it being more prominent in rural areas (farms & highlands possibly?) but when I watch documentaries in Scotland I don't see them except in parades and such.


Formal events and rugby/football international games mainly.

While I agree, some of the places ive lived (Dundee, Edinburgh, Arbroath, Pitlochry & Kirriemuir) there are people who wear them on a daily basis.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 04:21 AM
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Interesting timing, OP.

Just the yesterday I saw this crazy lookin' African dude at the airport in a black heavy leather kilt. And this was definitely a kilt too, not some other kind of garb. His face looked like he'd gotten to a serious fight with an axe or chainsaw (and lost badly) (seriously). This dude was sportin' a full-on purse too (black leather also), not a "man-bag", but a purse!

Wasn't quite sure what was up with that, but it was definitely..."different".



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 04:21 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Scotsman here. I own a kilt but the only time I wear it is for either weddings, old years night, or for scotland football or rugby matches.

I don't think anyone wears them day to day anymore, not even way up north or on the many islands.

I'll say one thing though, they are amazingly comfortable, airy, and the warmth they give is super impressive - in no way comparable to a plush bath towel


It does feel awesome putting on a kilt and sporran and going to big football/rugby game though



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 05:07 AM
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While I've never worn a kilt and have often thought they seemed a little "unmanly"


I will be back shortly to fix this....Much discussion is required.



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 05:15 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof




While I've never worn a kilt and have often thought they seemed a little "unmanly" (purely due to cultural norms I'm sure - b/c of my culture/background) but I did think they might have many advantages in some situations possibly less encumbered movement of lower body, more air flow/circulation to the groin region (a great benefit in hot & humid areas I would think).


From what I've read in the past your assessment might not be too far off, although this does appear to be contested;


...Since the 18th century it has been claimed that the philabeg, the small kilt that is now regarded as traditional, was invented by Thomas Rawlinson, a Lancashire Quaker, to be worn by workers in his Highlands iron smelting factory.

But this has been challenged by researchers who have found illustrations showing such kilts being worn long before Rawlinson arrived in Scotland in the 1720s.


Inde pendant Article

I've also read that it was the Romans who introduced the bagpipes into Britain, but let's not go there!





posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 06:02 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Right lads, I have spoken with the local chieftain, of clan coin (because am no tell'n ya ma second name) and there are several issues that need to be resolved with in this thread that I will address for the benefit of all members.

So the first point of order.....



While I've never worn a kilt and have often thought they seemed a little "unmanly"


Now after punching several tree's and screaming various obscenities at local sheep I have calmed down enough to address this issue calmly. You see the kilt is not a skirt, it is not in anyway feminine it is actually the embodiment of masculinity and when one puts on a kilt it makes the bat-suit look like your 14 year old sisters prom dress in comparison. Don't believe me I can proof this. This is me in a kilt



As you can see I transform from a pasty white guy with a bit of a dad-bod into this Celtic god all thanks to the kilt. So now that have debunked this nonsense about it being unmanly allow me to move on.



The closest I've come to experience this is wearing a bath towel


No you have not came close to ever having wore anything like a kilt unless you have somehow also wore Toney Starks Iron man MK42 suit, the actual suit. Comparing a kilt to wearing a towel is like comparing a fire cracker to a nuke. You are wrong on so many levels.



I found this so comfortable that I would often choose to remain in the towel/"kilt" w/ shirt for the remainder of the nights when I shower and often fall asleep in it.


Good, good, very good, you are learning....



I will say the only thing I'm not crazy about is using the toilet (standing or sitting) while using this, but that could be due to the size of the towel & it's no big issue.


Thats because you're doing it wrong, when wearing a kilt one is not supposed to wear any kind of undergarment, if you have any kind of underwear on you might has well have just turned up in your wife's wedding dress wearing a chastity belt under it with a big sign on you're head saying "I am a wuss". When going for a pish (pee) just lift up and let go, when going for a jobby (poop) just find a bit of heather and let the beast out of the cave.

Now you also ask about when one wears a kilt in Scotland, gone are the days when we wear them all the time however in general we wear them as often as possible. Popular occasions include rabbie-Burns night and the hunt o' the wee baby haggis or the wedding of your bitch ex-gf who you are still madly in love with despite having been married yourself for 10 years with kids just to show her what she is missing out on as "Tim" is standing up there with in her in his "tux", the look in her eye, thats the kilt, I digress. Other occasions include sporting occasions like elephant polo, curling or drafts to intimidate the opponents. Of course let's not forget the significance of the kilt in times of war, who needs a tooled up Navy Seal when you can just flash you bum to the enemy. Finally, the most important use of the kilt is to score with foreign burds (wimin folk) who see a Scottish lad in a kilt and start undressing in front of you. Seriously my brother took his kilt over to America and had a extremely high success rate.

Finally on kilt design.



He might be English but he's not far off.

Any other questions please just let me know.
edit on 6-3-2019 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

I declined the offer of being an usher at a mates wedding because he wanted me to wear a kilt.

I have nothing against Scotsmen wearing kilts but I really don't understand why someone who has absolutely no connection whatsoever with Scotland would want to wear one at his wedding and then inflict the same ignominy on his best man and ushers etc.

I have never seen an ordinary Scotsman going about his everyday business wearing a kilt in my numerous visits to Scotland.

ETA.

Could that be classified as 'cultural appropriation' in todays new world?


edit on 6/3/19 by Freeborn because: Add ETA



posted on Mar, 6 2019 @ 08:01 AM
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I declined the offer of being an usher at a mates wedding because he wanted me to wear a kilt.


Same here. Although at least my mate is a Scotsman. But the tradition meant going full commando. So I was more concerned about embarrassing dandruff on the shoes than anything.




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