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Hold On To Your Gyroscope ~ The Nellis Range Ufo Revisited

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posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 07:37 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Box of Rain
a reply to: The GUT
There's no way for me to tell if the object is making those jerky movements or if the camera is moving that way.

The story goes that the apparent jumps are a result of the theodolite filming the thing trying to track it and not keeping up. The slow rotations and shape changes are done by the object, which traveled on a fairly smooth path.


Thanks. I figured some of the motion was from the object, but I didn't think we can really tell if the more jumpy "bee-like maneuvers", as the OP called it, were movements of the object or were caused by the camera jerking around.


edit on 2019/3/1 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 07:32 PM
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originally posted by: moebius
...As soon as external friction comes in, damping the angular momentum changes or imparting additional angular momentum to the craft. The whole process becomes irreversible. The gyro would quickly saturate and become useless.


I'm not sure that's defensible. Not saying that "competing forces" wouldn't be an engineering issue, just that from your explanation it isn't clear how the concept couldn't be achieved.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: The GUT

Apparently I misunderstood your original question.

As your source says, gyros are used for attitude control in spacecraft (aiming the Kepler, for example), not propulsion. Trying to use a gyroscope for propulsion (or maneuvering) would be like trying to lift yourself up by pulling on your feet.

edit on 3/1/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 09:20 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: The GUT

Apparently I misunderstood your original question.

As your source says, gyros are used for attitude control in spacecraft (aiming the Kepler, for example), not propulsion. Trying to use a gyroscope for propulsion (or maneuvering) would be like trying to lift yourself up by pulling on your feet.


Propulsion hasn't been on the table in regards gyroscopic precession---although the question of propulsion for the Nellis UFO is certainly left unanswered.

Again, as in the reply to Moebius, as far as spatial attitude goes I don't see how you've made the case that it's not feasible.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 09:56 PM
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a reply to: The GUT

It's fully "feasible." But not as practical as aerodynamic controls. Aerodynamic controls work fine in air and weigh less. With a gyro you need the mass of the wheel to change attitude. With aerodynamic controls you have the mass of the air outside the aircraft.

edit on 3/1/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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