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National Geographic's Afghan Girl...

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posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:03 PM
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I am sure that most will remember the girl on the National Geographic cover that was crazy popular, later they showed her picture after living a very hard life, there was a very dramatic difference between the two.
Getting more to the point, Tony Northrup just released a (different kind of) video that tells the (supposedly) true story of how that cover shot came to be.
(I say, "supposedly" because I have not double-checked Tony's version, but I do trust him)

If you have the time, please watch this video, you can skip the commercials if they bother you, but he is not accepting money for this video, and is donating money to a worthwhile charity.
This is a VERY good video, about the photographer that came to take it, and the good and bad about it all, I know that I was really surprised about the new revelations (at least to me) about how the photographer actually got the photo.

Anyway, I hope that this is in the right place...
Oh yeah, please do not make this political, this is about the girl and the photographer only... O course there's always something that can be made political, but this doesn't need to be, in my opinion. I am only posting this because it is about the girl's side of the story, it is very interesting and it only goes to show how we seem to never really get the real story sometimes.

Thanks!

www.youtube.com...




posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:05 PM
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I remember this picture, I always thought she had stunningly beautiful eyes. Shame she was exploited like that.
edit on 2 28 2019 by Shockerking because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:19 PM
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I still have that issue somewhere.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: recrisp

Really interesting story, thank you for sharing it.

Just a text recap:

petapixel.com... rue-story-behind-the-iconic-afghan-girl-photo/


In publishing the photo on its cover, National Geographic stated in the issue that the girl’s eyes were “reflecting the fear of a war.”

“Not true,” Northrup says. “Her eyes were reflecting the fear of an unfamiliar man. The fear of her personal boundaries being breached and her beliefs being trampled on. She had nothing else to be afraid of that day except for Steve McCurry. She had been living in that camp for a couple of years. She was in school.”

And while McCurry would go on to become internationally celebrated as the photographer behind the portrait, Gula’s life has been marked with extreme hardship and suffering. In addition to losing her husband and one of her children, Gula was arrested in Pakistan in 2016 for using a fake ID card and living in the country illegally. She was then deported by Pakistan to Afghanistan, which celebrated her return.


all about the benjamins



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky
I'm glad that y'all liked it, I thought it was really interesting to see where it all came from, I had no idea, I doubt that anyone did.

Thank you too for posting the text about it, I always forget to do that here, no other place I go to has that rule.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: recrisp

Very compelling story of the young lady, if true, as presented. Thank you for sharing, I do remember this cover when published. My thoughts are very mixed to what greater good was served, the photographer, the plight of the war refugees or the young girl when photographed.

I will temper my negative thoughts and just say, I hope she is truly in a better place.
edit on 28-2-2019 by PastyGansta because: spelling of course



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: recrisp

I remember collecting National Geographics as a kid. That was our internet back in the old days!

That cover, something was just haunting about that child's eyes, we all felt it.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: recrisp

I don't think there is a text rule at all. Sometimes i'm in a spot that I can't watch a video or listen to audio so I thought I would help a little bit.

the workplace just needs to loosen up a bit .... what? they pay me to do actual work?



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky
I don't know, but I assume that it is because of work, like you say, and maybe phones too. I am not a 'phone person', I use my PC, so I can see anything, at anytime, so it never dawns on me.


Yeah, companies are weird that way, they must be stopped! heheh



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:53 PM
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a reply to: PastyGansta
Yeah, you and me both!



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Mesmerizing eyes, for sure, they are haunting. It's hard to see that really innocent kid that led that life and now she looks like she's been through pure hell.
A lot of photographers are that way, they are people too, good and bad, and he was doing what they did then, probably, they don't get away with that crap as much now, at least, I hope.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 04:08 PM
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originally posted by: recrisp
a reply to: JAGStorm

Mesmerizing eyes, for sure, they are haunting. It's hard to see that really innocent kid that led that life and now she looks like she's been through pure hell.



I was going to go in that direction. I was in my early teens when this was published. I do recall seeing it for many years in doctors offices and such stale places. If that is her, now, as presented, I can only imagine the horror and sorrow she experienced in life. I am very lucky I am where I am.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 04:22 PM
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One of my big regrets is not keeping my extensive nat geo collection. Probably had every issue going back to the 70s.

If she was born in America, she'd probably have been a super model. Natural beauty but that hard life in Afghanistan did not age her well at all.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: PastyGansta
It's good that you made it!



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 04:58 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated
I collected magazines and some started in the late 60's, so I can relate.
I still have them, but most were ruined in a flood.


I don't know about her height, but her face would have certainly been one that attracted people so they'd buy a magazine or whatever the ad would be selling.
I am sure that we all had our own thoughts about why her look was so fearful, nobody would think that it was because of a crazy photographer...
She probably would have looked completely different had she lived a peaceful life in a peaceful place. For me, I thought like you, her life took a toll on her face, and more than likely, her mind. I really feel for her, I hope that she is a happier person now.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 05:10 PM
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www.youtube.com...

2 % of the population have eyes that green



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 05:52 PM
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Child exploitation, both by the photographer and National Geographic. Not surprised, but more disappointed. They actually put this girl's life into more danger. Never judge a book by it's cover.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: Megaso
True dat.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:00 PM
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Punished for having your picture taken......
Islam is a turd that needs flushed.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: recrisp



Recently searched for in her country....this picture explains the then and now.



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