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Beyond Bigelow & BAASS, After AATIP and on To the Stars...

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posted on Mar, 7 2020 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: ConfusedBrit


It was as boring as hell CB!!! But it might excite some?







posted on Mar, 7 2020 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: ConfusedBrit


originally posted by: Sublant

UFO phenomena is real, it is more than just lights in the sky and they are unidentified.


Well, that is pretty inarguable - even Project Blue Book's 27-year-old study left a 5% residue of unidentified lights. After all, nothing is ever just a "light in the sky" since every light must have a source. We all hope for a truly anomalous and glamorous source for the unidentified quota since we're all romantics on ATS to some extent.

We will just keep exposing scammers whilst waiting for the real proof... waiting... and waiting... just as the next generation will continue waiting... and waiting...

We deserve a bloody medal for patience, to be honest.




No argument.

But to me, cases like Father Gill et al. Cash-Landrum and the Nimitz incident make the phenomenon a nuts and bolts discussion. Among other things.
edit on 7-3-2020 by Sublant because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2020 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: ConfusedBrit

Think the 'giant disinfo campaign' has been going a lot longer than that dude and the MSM is positively crawling with intelligence operatives pushing their cheeky agendas - also interesting to look at these crazy TTSA developments in a larger context where 'authorative' news narratives are now being shamelessly manipulated and UFO entertainment programmes are quite literally programming people (also intriguing that they're hell bent on marginalising 'alternative' news and conspiracy theories are now being viewed as a criminal enterprise (link).


edit on 7-3-2020 by karl 12 because: Spelling



posted on Mar, 7 2020 @ 02:45 PM
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UFO programs are going to become redundant. When nothing new happens but a few obscure sightings because whatever it is, something truly paranormal or not, it has become settled into the culture. TTSA, and their very flimsy output, is proof Ufology is drying up.

For example, I would bet TTSA and their new docu-series will add nothing novel to Ufology (going over the same old past UFO events) and nothing new. Maybe go over AGAIN their Nimitz video… They’ll gripe about the government doing research--that’s surely nothing new.

That’s why we all intuitively knew TTSA BETTER be about disclosure or it’s just another scam.
And indeed, that has turned out to be the case.

What’s happening in ufology are the extreme ideas like AA, and paranormal ET lore all based on nonsense from some writers reinterpreting the old events into their crazy theories about ETs, and some more serious-minded researchers and scientists grumbling repeatedly about (let’s do some real research) which never get’s done.

There are, of course, some serious writers, Redfern, Vallee (but getting old) but how much can they recycle the same material over and over. How many books on the MIBs can they write?

Ufology, to use an analogous idea form feminism, has a glass ceiling. We’ve reached it and unless new, paranormal events occur, it's going to dry up or just become more obscure because participating ufology projects will merely repeat commentaries on the same events over and over.

We truly needed something new but TTSA isn’t it.



posted on Mar, 8 2020 @ 09:11 AM
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Suppose this is relevant when it comes to CIA sponsored disinfo campaigns attempting to manage the public dimension of the UFO problem.





After a year of unprecedented UFO activity and genuine concern by the U.S. national security community, the hammer came down in early 1953 to put the matter to sleep once and for all. That was the mission of the CIA-sponsored Robertson Panel, analyzed here by historian Richard Dolan



Also interesting that the panel's conclusions were drafted before it actually convened (making it an even bigger whitewash than Condon) - plenty of other examples out there but when it comes to the UFO subject it seems the CIA literally just cannot stop bullsh•tting.
edit on 8-3-2020 by karl 12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2020 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: karl 12


Good history lesson. He’s right about the ET possibility, in-fact the first project— Project Sign concluded, according to Donald Keyhoe, that the UFOs were ET. That was covered up.
en.wikipedia.org...

Project Sign may have been the best and most legitimate one of the ones they admit to. The others were all cover jobs, likely including ATTIP, whatever ATTIP really was or is.




During that year Project Sign collected reports on a large number of cases, con­ducted some on-site investigations and many interviews, and attempted to analyze the UFO phenomenon in any way available. By the fall of 1948 the lead personnel of Sign decided that their investigations pointed to a conclusion. As was usually done for any intelligence analysis, they then composed what the military called an “Esti­mate of the Situation” which they sent to their superiors in the Pentagon. Their con­clusion: The flying-disk phenomenon was caused by extraterrestrial agencies.

This created a great stir in the Pentagon. Authorities there were unwilling to ac­cept it. The fallout of this consternation resulted in a quashing of the document, and a denial to the public that it had ever existed.




link



posted on Mar, 9 2020 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

Ruppelt’s book, available free of charge here, contains a history lesson on project Sign and its 1948 ‘Estimate of the situation’ report (Ruppelt was in charge of project Grudge/Blue Book from late 1951 to late 1953):



On September 23, 1947, the chief of the Air Technical Intelligence Center, one of the Air Force's most highly specialized intelligence units, sent a letter to the Commanding General of the then Army Air Forces.
The letter was in answer to the Commanding General's verbal request to make a preliminary study of the reports of unidentified flying objects. The letter said that after a preliminary study of UFO reports, ATIC concluded that, to quote from the letter, "the reported phenomena were real." The letter strongly urged that a permanent project be established at ATIC to investigate and analyze future UFO reports. […]
ATICs intelligence specialists were confident that within a few months or a year they would have the answer to the question, "What are UFO's?"
The question, "Do UFO's exist?" was never mentioned.
The only problem that confronted the people at ATIC was, "Were the UFO's of Russian or interplanetary origin?" Either case called for a serious, secrecy-shrouded project. Only top people at ATIC were assigned to Project Sign.
[…]
Like the Allies, after World War II the Soviets had obtained complete sets of data on the latest German developments. This, coupled with rumors that the Soviets were frantically developing the German ideas, caused no small degree of alarm. […]
Every intelligence report dealing with the Germans' World War II aeronautical research had been studied to find out if the Russians could have developed any of the late German designs into flying saucers. Aerodynamicists at ATIC and at Wright Field's Aircraft Laboratory computed the maximum performance that could be expected from the German designs. The designers of the aircraft themselves were contacted. "Could the Russians develop a flying saucer from their designs?" The answer was, "No, there was no conceivable way any aircraft could perform that would match the reported maneuvers of the UFO's."
[…]
Still convinced that the UFO's were real objects, the people at ATIC began to change their thinking. Those who were convinced that the UFO's were of Soviet origin now began to eye outer space, not because there was any evidence that the UFO's did come from outer space but because they were convinced that UFO's existed and only some unknown race with a highly developed state of technology could build such vehicles. […]
A few days after a DC-3 was buzzed, the people at ATIC decided that the time had arrived to make an Estimate of the Situation. The situation was the UFO's; the estimate was that they were interplanetary!
It was a rather thick document with a black cover and it was printed on legal-sized paper. Stamped across the front were the words TOP SECRET.
When the estimate was completed, typed, and approved, it started up through channels to higher-command echelons. It drew considerable comment but no one stopped it on its way up. […]
It got to the late General Hoyt S. Vandenberg, then Chief of Staff, before it was batted back down. The general wouldn't buy interplanetary vehicles. The report lacked proof. A group from ATIC went to the Pentagon to bolster their position but had no luck, the Chief of Staff just couldn't be convinced.


So, after concluding that "the reported phenomena were real” and "there was no conceivable way any aircraft could perform that would match the reported maneuvers of the UFO's", there really was no other option than to attribute UFO’s to non-human technology.

This logical process of elimination, however, did not convince everybody back in 1948. And it still does not today. There is always a non-zero possibility that equipment malfunctions or that people misinterpret things.

So, until we get our hands on a real piece of alien tech or some alien DNA, things are not going to change.
In 1947, the Twining memo already pointed to “the lack of physical evidence which would undeniably prove the existence of these objects”.



posted on Mar, 9 2020 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: Guest101

So, until we get our hands on a real piece of alien tech or some alien DNA, things are not going to change.
In 1947, the Twining memo already pointed to “the lack of physical evidence which would undeniably prove the existence of these objects”.


The Majestic-12 scam must have momentarily pleased the Roswell fan club by polluting the waters with a 'second Twining memo' dated July 1954 - specifically the hoax memo from Robert Cutler to Twining. To this day, such pollution still infects ufology, the 1954 memo often quoted in discussions whilst the 1947 one is sidelined.

(The subsequent Project Serpo scam further tried to soothe Roswell fans who hated the 1947 Twining memo by claiming there was a 1949 crash retrieval - the same story fed to a gibbering Tom Delonge at his first clandestine meeting with the Big Boys.)

That the Majestic-12 junk ("MJ-12" was also incorporated in the Lazar story for S-4's ID badges and Lazar's own car number-plate!) is still embraced by many people - on this very site, too - is quite depressing.


PS: For those interested, here is Lazar's personalised Corvette number-plate:



I'm sure John Lear fell about laughing when he saw it!


edit on 9-3-2020 by ConfusedBrit because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2020 @ 07:21 PM
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a reply to: Guest101

Ruppelt's book is a seminal work for those who enjoy the history of ufology. Whatever side of the fence they sit on. It's a very detailed book from one of the few Heads of Project Blue Book that took the role seriously. It covers the more innocent days of ufology as well. It's very interesting that he makes no mention of Roswell. The Holy Grail of American ufology that can never be allowed to be anything less than an alien spacecraft crashing in the desert.

However in his expanded 2nd edition of his book he wrote



The only reason there are any "unknowns" in the UFO files is that an effort is made to be scientific in making evaluations. And being scientific doesn't allow for any educated assuming of missing data or the passing of judgment on the character of the observer. However, this is closely akin to being forced to follow the Marquis of Queensbury rules in a fight with a hood. The investigation of any UFO sighting is an inexact science at the very best. Any UFO investigator, after a few months of being steeped in UFO lore and allowed a few scientific rabbit punches, can make the best of the "unknowns" look like a piece of well-holed Swiss cheese......

No responsible scientist will argue with the fact that other solar systems may be inhabited and that some day we may meet those people. But it hasn't happened yet and until that day comes we're stuck with our Space Age Myth--the UFO.


We haven't really moved on from those days have we?

We've gone from ATIC in the 1950s to AATIP in the 2000s. The UFO has become the UAP. From Ruppelt to Zondo. From Keyhoe to Dolan. From Keel to Vallee. From NICAP to MUFON and even us here. Everyone of us has failed to solve the mystery.

Well except maybe in cases like the Roswell slides where all but the most delusional believers accept they were never pictures of an alien being. But then that was the case for the Alien Autopsy film. Until that was revived recently. Even SERPO has come back to haunt us again.

That's why it's frustrating when TTSA and their associated resurrect cases like Bob Lazar. We argue about the minute details like where he studied and whether he has a stable version of E115. Instead of asking what did he ever prove?

The answer is nothing.

It's like this 16 year old Nimitz case that TTSA have invested so heavily in. What have they proved about it other than we don't know what it was? They don't seem to have anything else either. Which suggests that it's all been stage managed for a long, long time and the people involved are up to something else other than studying UFOs.

But the people who believe in it all can't see anything beyond UFOs......



posted on Mar, 9 2020 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: mirageman




It covers the more innocent days of ufology as well. It's very interesting that he makes no mention of Roswell. The Holy Grail of American ufology that can never be allowed to be anything less than an alien spacecraft crashing in the desert.


You know, mm, that's an interesting point about Roswell.
Apparently, Roswell, whatever it really was all about, wasn’t at all on the public’s mind including the researchers, almost as if it didn't happen.

It just goes to show us that they really did resurrect that story in the 80s from the dead.

I wonder what TTSA will say in their upcoming "documentary" series about Roswell?

edit on 9-3-2020 by Willtell because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2020 @ 08:56 PM
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originally posted by: mirageman
a reply to: Guest101

Ruppelt's book is a seminal work for those who enjoy the history of ufology. Whatever side of the fence they sit on. It's a very detailed book from one of the few Heads of Project Blue Book that took the role seriously. It covers the more innocent days of ufology as well. It's very interesting that he makes no mention of Roswell. The Holy Grail of American ufology that can never be allowed to be anything less than an alien spacecraft crashing in the desert.

However in his expanded 2nd edition of his book he wrote
...
"And being scientific doesn't allow for any educated assuming of missing data or the passing of judgment on the character of the observer."
...
We haven't really moved on from those days have we?
In large part, no, but in one way, I think we have a better perspective on that statement (some of us, at least), which implies a witness of high character can be completely relied upon to be accurate.

There are some people who still cling steadfastly to this belief in spite of the fact we now have more evidence than ever that even witnesses of the highest character can be subject to misperceptions. Here's an example that came up recently in an ATS thread, a mass UFO sighting where a witness of good character, a doctor, and maybe his driver and some witnesses at the patient's house, saw alien beings inside:

Canary Islands Mass UFO Sighting, 1976


Although bizarre, the doctor’s testimony was corroborated by the taxi driver, as well as by witnesses at the patient’s house. But the investigative adjutant reportedly still debated whether he should accept the doctor’s deposition. It was his belief that the witnesses of the humanoid figures in the sphere, “facing the presence of an unusual phenomenon in the sky, narrated what their ‘minds’ made them see, mutually influencing each other.” He goes on to say in the records that he “doesn’t have the slightest doubt about their seriousness and sincerity. They told what they unquestionably ‘believed’ to have seen.”
So here we have multiple witnesses of good character where investigators had no doubt they described honestly what they saw, and this is not an isolated case by any means.

By the way, that site about the incident still doesn't say what the UFO actually was, even though it's been known for years as explained on the recent ATS thread, and now we can confirm that the investigator's guess about a multiple eyewitness illusion by witnesses of good character seems very probably correct:

New YouTube Video On 1976 Canary Islands Mass UFO Sighting


Which suggests that it's all been stage managed for a long, long time and the people involved are up to something else other than studying UFOs.

But the people who believe in it all can't see anything beyond UFOs......
Yes, the UFOs seem to be like one "player" on a stage of a much larger "play", though the agenda of the "play" is not completely clear, perhaps because there may not be a single agenda. One possible agenda could be to secure more funding against the "threat" that Chris Mellon recently spoke of, even though General Sanford said many years ago he didn't see any pattern of any threat to the United States from UFOs and it seems he was right since no UFOs have attacked the US since he said that. Or another possible agenda could be to muddy the UFO waters, to deflect attention away from possible black project tests being sighted.


originally posted by: Guest101
This logical process of elimination, however, did not convince everybody back in 1948. And it still does not today. There is always a non-zero possibility that equipment malfunctions or that people misinterpret things.
I think we have pretty good evidence by now that the possibility that even witnesses of good character can misinterpret things is way, way, way above zero.


In 1947, the Twining memo already pointed to “the lack of physical evidence which would undeniably prove the existence of these objects”.
That would be nice to have. In the case of David Fravor's "tic-tac", apparently the crew of the E2 Hawkeye might have got a better look at it visually or perhaps electronically recording some electromagnetic emissions, and even that kind of information would be better than just Fravor's eyewitness sighting alone. But apparently the Hawkeye crew was required to sign non-disclosure agreements. Or if David Fravor had turned on his camera so we could have a video of his actual UFO, instead of another object filmed at a later time by another pilot who says he can't be sure it's the same object. Neither of those would be the actual UFO, but if the UFO is what I speculated, there might not ever be any physical evidence of it other than things like what I just mentioned, like E2 EM recordings or camera recordings. I'm not sure at all about my speculation, but a review of the E2 recordings could confirm or reject my idea.

Maybe someday they will be declassified, but speculation does not need to be done in a vacuum. We know the Navy has some high tech things, the details of which are not publicly known beyond articles like these:

The Navy's Secretive And Revolutionary Program To Project False Fleets From Drone Swarms



posted on Mar, 9 2020 @ 09:47 PM
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a reply to: mirageman


originally posted by: mirageman
a reply to: Guest101

Ruppelt's book is a seminal work for those who enjoy the history of ufology. Whatever side of the fence they sit on. It's a very detailed book from one of the few Heads of Project Blue Book that took the role seriously. It covers the more innocent days of ufology as well. It's very interesting that he makes no mention of Roswell. The Holy Grail of American ufology that can never be allowed to be anything less than an alien spacecraft crashing in the desert.

However in his expanded 2nd edition of his book he wrote



The only reason there are any "unknowns" in the UFO files is that an effort is made to be scientific in making evaluations. And being scientific doesn't allow for any educated assuming of missing data or the passing of judgment on the character of the observer. However, this is closely akin to being forced to follow the Marquis of Queensbury rules in a fight with a hood. The investigation of any UFO sighting is an inexact science at the very best. Any UFO investigator, after a few months of being steeped in UFO lore and allowed a few scientific rabbit punches, can make the best of the "unknowns" look like a piece of well-holed Swiss cheese......

No responsible scientist will argue with the fact that other solar systems may be inhabited and that some day we may meet those people. But it hasn't happened yet and until that day comes we're stuck with our Space Age Myth--the UFO.


We haven't really moved on from those days have we?

We've gone from ATIC in the 1950s to AATIP in the 2000s. The UFO has become the UAP. From Ruppelt to Zondo. From Keyhoe to Dolan. From Keel to Vallee. From NICAP to MUFON and even us here. Everyone of us has failed to solve the mystery.

Well except maybe in cases like the Roswell slides where all but the most delusional believers accept they were never pictures of an alien being. But then that was the case for the Alien Autopsy film. Until that was revived recently. Even SERPO has come back to haunt us again.

That's why it's frustrating when TTSA and their associated resurrect cases like Bob Lazar. We argue about the minute details like where he studied and whether he has a stable version of E115. Instead of asking what did he ever prove?

The answer is nothing.

It's like this 16 year old Nimitz case that TTSA have invested so heavily in. What have they proved about it other than we don't know what it was? They don't seem to have anything else either. Which suggests that it's all been stage managed for a long, long time and the people involved are up to something else other than studying UFOs.

But the people who believe in it all can't see anything beyond UFOs......


Well said. A gem of a comment.

I watched a Blue Book episode a couple days back and did a double take — Robert Zemeckis (sp?) is executive producer or something. And no doubt William Shatner, 88, is doing his best Robert Stack on History Channel. #DontHateThePlayerHateTheGame

Enjoyed your threads 👍 TTSA was transparent from the start but your research nailed them to a cross. #UFOtainment



edit on 9-3-2020 by Cravens because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2020 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: mirageman




It's like this 16 year old Nimitz case that TTSA have invested so heavily in. What have they proved about it other than we don't know what it was? They don't seem to have anything else either. Which suggests that it's all been stage managed for a long, long time and the people involved are up to something else other than studying UFOs.


One wonders whether TTSA might have thought it would be a game-changer
and a SLAM DUNK with the Nimitz video
TTSAs Slam Dunk Nimitz Video



I think they were wrong and they look as inept and silly as the above NBA stars at their worst




edit on 9-3-2020 by Willtell because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 09:47 AM
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originally posted by: mirageman
a reply to: Guest101

Ruppelt's book is a seminal work for those who enjoy the history of ufology. [...]

However in his expanded 2nd edition of his book he wrote

"Any UFO investigator, after a few months of being steeped in UFO lore and allowed a few scientific rabbit punches, can make the best of the "unknowns" look like a piece of well-holed Swiss cheese......"

We haven't really moved on from those days have we?


I wouldn’t judge too quickly just because someone is eager to shoot holes in the evidence and those holes are quickly embraced by mainstream scientists.

The evidence for the existence of meteorites was dismissed by mainstream scientists for decades because rocks in space were not part of the scientific world view at that time – interplanetary space was considered to be empty so rocks would never fall from the sky.

The current mainstream scientific world view considers the distances between stars as too big for anyone to come here. Because of this world view, scientific study of radio waves is taken seriously while scientific study of UFO cases is treated as fringe science.

However, we cannot deny that there are some very compelling UFO cases. Cases for which the skeptical explanations look like a Swiss cheese instead of the cases themselves...

At the same time our own theoretical scientists are coming with ideas to exceed light speed, like the Alcubierre warp drive. These ideas may lead to a reconsideration of the required travel times to reach us.

Another difference with the ‘old days’ are modern military sensor networks. They are designed to correlate sensor data from multiple platforms in real time, and show the results on Situational Awareness (SA) monitors in planes and on ships.

Correlation of sensor data (like data from multiple radars) has always been a problem because it’s hard to prove that the data covers exactly the same point in space at exactly the same time. Military sensor networks are an unprecedented opportunity to collect reliable multi-sensor data on UFO’s, because they are designed to correlate data from multiple sensors.

If the Navy managed to get correlated multi-sensor data in 2014/2015 when the USS Roosevelt was buzzed by UFO’s for days, and this data really showed objects performing beyond believe, this might have been a real eye opener to them.

edit on 10-3-2020 by Guest101 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 09:55 AM
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Well in other news; a writer called mj banias (no idea) has posted an interview with Brandon Fugal (lets see how long this stays up) who confirms he is the owner of Skinwalker Ranch; which to be honest is something most already knew anyway.

Who

Brandon Fugal, a Utah-based real estate mogul and tech investor.


Skinwalker as a Project

It is strange. Skinwalker Ranch, as a project, is so unconventional and so outside of my normal course of business and really, frankly, anyone's normal course of business, that it presents a whole new problem set,” he said. “I’ve lost some sleep over it. I worry about what some of my clients and colleagues will think. It’s controversial. That is why I’ve waited so long and stayed out of the spotlight


Firmage Connection

Fugal’s journey to Skinwalker Ranch began in 2010. He and several other investors launched a project focused on testing gravitational physics theories involving exotic propulsion and renewable energy. In really simple terms, it was an attempt to create a gravitational reduction device that could produce clean energy. Fugal admits it was a shot in the dark.

“It was a challenging time. Admittedly, we were all governed by this childlike wonder. We were filled with excitement and gut-wrenching frustration at every turn,” Fugal said. “To be blunt, there were issues concerning the original partner involved with the project.


Blood on the Box

Fugal continued to invest in and launch other technology companies. From various software ventures to most recently a company that has developed a shoebox-sized high-performance liquid chromatograph that enables immediate analysis of various liquids such as blood.


The Usual Suspects Strike again?
He also confirms that on this project; he worked with Kit Green & Hal Puthoff. He also strongly infers / confirms that it was indeed his relationship with them, which is what instigated the sale of the ranch to him in the first place;

“They wanted to introduce me to Mr. Bigelow because of the positive experience we had working together and asked if I would be willing to potentially entertain meeting with Mr. Bigelow regarding the ranch,” Fugal stated. “I had heard of the ranch but I never really thought about it until they proposed the idea.” The sale was arranged, Fugal flew in on his private helicopter and assessed the property, and purchased Skinwalker Ranch following months of legal negotiations.


There has been video of UAP at the area too allegedly and as much as there has been talk of the place being turned into a Alien DisneyLand - Brandon says that's not going to happen - cancel the MooMoo bus Mirageman!

Bigelow No Go

Fugal explained that absolutely no transfer of data or information was involved with the sale of the ranch.


The Mormons Strike Back?

Fugal, like many in Utah, was born into the Mormon church and considers himself spiritual. I considered the possibility that the Skinwalker Ranch project was a personal quest for him; a quest for validation or for God



Source SWR Article
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posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: pigsy2400

ok, this will be a long one. Below is the non-conspiracy analysis regarding TTSA’s early formation and end goals. i think this speculative view just needs to be spelled out as a whole.

we know the congressman designated monies for study of anomalous phenomena (UAPs). We know Bigelow and crew landed and eventually fulfilled that classified contract.

we know the TTSA cast of characters in most cases worked together with the Bigelow project, and many knew each other beforehand. We know this because media fame connects itself to some of these figures despite their classified work (Putoff, green et al...), and basically they can all be traced to the $22 mil Bigelow study.

this imo, tells us something about Lue’s role prior-to TTSAs formation. Using as a template for analysis known intelligence agency behaviors, we can extrapolate some of Lue’s role for DOD in the UAP dept.

Lue was a liaison of sorts. He was also sourcing/networking individual “assets“ along the line of traditional spycraft. It must be understood that Lue was very likely NOT a “researcher” of UFOs or anomalous phenomena in his capacity at DOD.

In Lue’s world, you have “sources”, both public and private. In a study like UAPs you wouldn’t research physics yourself and study every case yourself. You would consult the EXPERTS and other source assets. We are not referring to UFOlogy experts, but science experts, government and military experts. There is a great likelihood this is how Lue came into contact with the Bigelow crew in his attempt to grasp the phenomena for the DOD. There are few classified researchers in the odd-science field, and i doubt the military keeps any on staff. That is where private corporations (contractors) come in.

again and again we see TTSA talking about networking with other nation state government sources. This is a perfect example of the above concept. Lue consulted everyone with security clearances he could — private science contractors, military witnesses, other governments sources overseas...all the things a spy would consult. My guess is he also did a little open source research, but not much. I am sure his efforts were largely confined to what he thought was more valid intelligence assets...aka the type of asset base he was used to networking with professionally. Eventually, It was natural Lue would approach the government’s favorite UFO data hoarder, Bigelow.

Most of these people all had done their networking under Bigelow, who was likely less compartmentalized than government in-house studies would have been. the funds were drying out in the paranormal research field as Bigelow wound down the contract, so the TTSA crew made the decision to come together as a corporation...a money making endeavor realizing a few things: they had media star-power assets with some of the already famous team members, they had probably the largest group of paranormal-type scientists in the country (in their mind the field is “cutting edge”), and they had the necessary clearances to handle big budget black studies.

Tom, meanwhile, is banging on every door... Lue heard, and so did the whole Podesta clan, who passed the word on down the line until Tom was one of the gang. Why Tom. Well damn, son, Tom is famous with a much huger and more lucrative demographic fanbase than even Hal‘s media antics or Melon’s political dancing could ever create. Tom is an asset, son. And when an asset this size walks right up and sits in your lap you dont say no, boy!

After Bigelow, the boys realize the subject (anomalous phenomena) is fun. It makes money. It has huge media potential. There are lucrative classified contracts. The entire fanbase and wacky field is wide open for hijacking and owning. ...the team is formed. They are leaving government and going private sector —. every spook’s true dream retirement...the legendary revolving door, but since odd science can’t get conventional gigs, they will build their own oil corporation!

The boys decide to get investor funding to increase, not waste, their own wealth. Government is lobbied for the need to address the UAP “threat” and earmark public funds for another classified study (a “needed” continuation of the first, perhaps). The media is rolled out, and the boys want to go BIG at the end of the day. Media content is money! Media will grab market share from UFOlogy’s lame few.

end goal. Own the anomalous (UAP currently, anything at all later) media sector. Own the goofy science (uhh...cutting edge) classified government contract sector. Develop and expand fanbase “asset” for major media/merchandise expansion. Own the UFO dialogue to control and develop market share. And last but not least, and the reason we know TTSA is staffed by true believers...Develop cutting edge technology informed by technological study (and assumed knowledge) of UAP and other anomalous phenomena.

*shrugs one last time. TTSA has convinced me beyond the shadow of a doubt that the United States government does not possess any alien artifacts, bodies, technology or proof of any kind regarding alien visitation. They call it UAPhenomena for a reason. It is not even an “object“ anymore. A technological “craft” IS an object. UAP is a phenomena. True dat, i do agree.



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 01:12 PM
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TTSA Oddities that make sense when you realize MONEY, not research or disclosure is TTSA’s primary goal, and that it has nothing to do with secret alien tech (except in their patent dreams).

Oddity - TTSA is often wrong about debunked UFO stuff, like mellon’s balloon, lazar’s book rights, the Italian fiasco, etc.
Cause - TTSA’s media is for media sake (money and fanbase). They are not, as they stated, a UFO research org. UFO “research” as we know it is web/book based. They have no more knowledge in “ufo research” than we do, basically.

Oddity - Tom’s TTSA philosophy books tell us nothing scientific-fact about UFOs. Of course, the fan base thinks he cannot divulge top secret info so he “alludes” to secret knowledge. but the truth is he has no proof or anything but theory, just like everyone else.
Cause - TTSAs Media is solely for media sake (money and fanbase)

Oddity - TTSA is selling a threat narrative regarding UFOs. There is little (no) evidence to support a threat narrative.
Cause - TTSA cannot lobby DOD or congress for funding to study UAPs (a classified contract they will surely receive) without a threat narrative.

Oddity - the focus on the Nimitz case. Beating a dead horse...why nothing new or interesting (or more risky)?
Cause - the Nimitz case sells the threat narrative to U.S. aerial assets (without looking airy-fairy) so best illustrates the need for study-funding (which TTSA is likely to receive).

Oddity - Tom D’s odd statements. Assumption> The military does not possess an alien body since there is no scientific evidence of physical alien bodies.
Cause - Tom was in charge of TTSA’s promo early on, and he could say whatever oddball craziness he wanted, since the entertainment division is for entertainment over proven fact; it is not the science tech/contracting division, whose activities would be partly classified from the DOD connections (but not because they know anything about UFOs).

Oddity - TTSA has insufficient staff funding to hold scientists on board and develop aerospace craft or major movies.
Cause - the science folks don’t serve clock time (besides the core crew of 5) UNLESS contracted deals come up, then they jump in for the contract duration. TTSAs early tech partnerships imply that currently they collaborate with other corporations on adapting and marketing the others’ tech to military procurement contacts they may have. Movies, etc. can also be contracted (rights for production). They could make a movie ABOUT TTSA some day...”the men who stare at fanbase”, perhaps?

Oddity - Zondo’s conflicting background.
Cause - government bureaucracy and those in DOD who dont like fringe, dropout guys...and internet fools with no life, of course. Hehe

Oddity - Bigelow connection to current TTSA
Cause - TTSA is following the Bigelow “private contractor for classified studies...make major media ($$$)” model that takes advantage of the media interest in odd science while disclosing nothing (btw, there was no proof of alien anything in Bigelow’s classified study or TTSA wouldn't be lobbying for funding today - so they have nothing to disclose).

On and on the list goes...from the small group of peeps involved from radio personalities, scientists, etc.. a small fringe circle, who circled up to make money and pursue their interests and enjoy some fame to boot. They have no secret UFO knowledge, i probably know more. That is not the game.

I CHALLENGE anyone here to name one TTSA oddity that doesn’t fit into this above format of TTSA being a money grab of (partly-retired) big dreamers, with little scientific substance (and a lot of a priori belief sets) when it comes to the proof of anomalous phenomena. The pieces of the puzzle come together perfectly in the simplest and most undeniable explanation...shallow idiot-media and corporate greed with the populace seen as consumer assets.

If anyone is looking for official disclosure of alien/dimensional/future anything, or any newly released alien tech., i believe they will be sorely disappointed.

Although it is dangerous to make blanket statements, at some point factoids and data need be collated to come up with coherent interpretation and conclusions. That is why analysts gather data...to arrive at ongoing analytic conclusion. In that light, as far as TTSA being a disinformation campaign, i would classify it more as a no-info campaign...because they have nothing of substance to disclose...no PROOF. They have HOPE. But so do we all. There is no way they could get all those scientists on board for an illegal domestic -op. It is likely what it looks like (similar to what TTSA has stated)...a clumsy start up corporation looking for customers. The only conspiracy was misleading the public that TTSA had secret government proof of alien UFOs. That was a self-serving LIE.

Cheers. Carry on...
edit on 10-3-2020 by Kahana1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 01:18 PM
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originally posted by: pigsy2400


Mr Banias, of course, failed to address the hoary old question on many people's lips about the ranch's trademark Goods & Services description:


Providing recreation facilities; Entertainment services, namely, creation, development, production, and distribution of multimedia content, internet content, motion pictures, and television shows.


And what about asking the tough question of why the owners who sold it to the Shermans in 1994 had never experienced any paranormal activity on the ranch (much to Mr Bige's annoyance)?



The Usual Suspects Strike again?
He also confirms that on this project; he worked with Kit Green & Hal Puthoff...


Same old same old same old same old....



As Fugal said:


“They wanted to introduce me to Mr. Bigelow because of the positive experience we had working together and asked if I would be willing to potentially entertain meeting with Mr. Bigelow regarding the ranch."


"... would be willing to potentially entertain meeting with..." - Christ, who the hell TALKS like that in the Real World?



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 01:38 PM
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www.vice.com...

This Is the Real Estate Magnate Who Bought Skinwalker Ranch,



...a UFO Hotspot
Brandon Fugal bought the infamous Utah ranch from aerospace billionaire Robert Bigelow in 2016.


Here's one secret now exposed.


Probably because his documentary is coming soon.
edit on 10-3-2020 by Willtell because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: Kahana1




we know the congressman designated monies for study of anomalous phenomena (UAPs). We know Bigelow and crew landed and eventually fulfilled that classified contract.


Do we know that money was set aside to study UAPS for sure? The only "official" release of a document pertaining to Bigelow's contract was the AAWSAP tender. That was a study ..


...to understand the physics and engineering of these applications as they apply to the foreign threat out to the far term, i.e., from now through the year 2050. Primary focus is on breakthrough technologies and applications that create discontinuities in currently evolving technology trends.


There have been no documents that mention AATIP released from official sources. And it would seem that a lot of the alleged $22m is as yet unaccounted for.





...Lue was a liaison of sorts. He was also sourcing/networking individual “assets“ along the line of traditional spycraft. It must be understood that Lue was very likely NOT a “researcher” of UFOs or anomalous phenomena in his capacity at DOD.


Yes....I think we all know which National Agency Zondo worked for. It's been hinted at a few times



...TTSA has convinced me beyond the shadow of a doubt that the United States government does not possess any alien artifacts, bodies, technology or proof of any kind regarding alien visitation....


And probably never did either.


edit on 10/3/2020 by mirageman because: ...



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