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PCE3

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posted on Feb, 27 2019 @ 02:10 AM
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How did life begin on Earth? That is one of the oldest and most profound questions that humans have ever tried to answer. Over the past several hundred years, the scientific answers have come a long way. Scientists want to understand what processes create life – both here and, possibly, on other planets – but there are many unsolved puzzles. To help solve the enigma, NASA this month launched a new research consortium – uniting researchers across multiple scientific disciplines – called Prebiotic Chemistry and Early Earth Environments or PCE3.

Scientists at University of California, Riverside (UCR) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) announced PCE3 on February 14, 2019. Lori Glaze, acting director of NASA Planetary Science, said NASA has high hopes for this new consortium:

prebioticchem.info...

PCE3 will use a virtual interactive portal to make data available to the wider scientific community. This data pertains to early environments on Earth and how those conditions allowed the chemistry needed for life to get kick-started. As explained by Karyn Rogers of RPI, one of four PCE3 co-leaders:

With this approach, we will incorporate realistic planetary conditions into prebiotic chemistry experiments, leading to models for the emergence of life that are consistent with what we know of our planet’s early history.

Planet Earth and the chemistry of life share the same road. Because of that co-evolution, we can use our understanding of the fundamental planetary processes that set the Earth system in motion to sketch the physical, chemical, and environmental map to life.

Here's a video from Karyn Rodgers who explains more about this approach

www.youtube.com...
edit on 27-2-2019 by DpatC because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 27 2019 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: DpatC

Say goodbye to creationism. Buh bye



posted on Feb, 27 2019 @ 09:00 AM
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originally posted by: Woodcarver
a reply to: DpatC

Say goodbye to creationism. Buh bye


the Halite crystals found in the meteorites Zag and Monahans have never been tested for traces of cellulose fibers?I have often wondered if the work of by Alfonso Davila of the SETI insitiute on the survival mechanism of cyanobacteria inhabiting the interior of halite pinnacles in the Yungay region of the Atacama desert could assist in our understanding of Life.
creationism whats that care to explain?



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