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Judgment is the death of human spirit

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posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 01:19 PM
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The purpose of religion is to provide a context in which we can live a meaningful, joyful, and rewarding lives. If the teachings of our religion are working well, everyone is healthy, joyful, and enthusiastically participating in our own lives. Over the centuries many teachers and prophets have identified different factors or ways of being that have caused our health, joy, and enthusiasm to die.

The idea of what causes enthusiasm to die can be summed up in the phrase, "this should not be." Whenever we think or feel, "this should not be," our spirit dies. Our enthusiasm dies. So how do we deal with this type of personal spiritual death?

We have to be mindful of it. We have to always be vigilant in the awareness of our own thinking and feeling. Whenever we think or feel, "this should not be" we have to try to breath deeply and just accept our new consequences without judgment. So many things in our lives are outside of our control. When we are constantly judging the events of our lives we lose sight of or fail to see that which will give us joy and happiness.

Fighting this battle of ever being vigilant and mindful of "this should not be" is all well and good but what about real consequence? What about the death of a precious loved one? Dealing with the death of a precious loved one is the most difficult spiritual battle one can face. Sometimes for some people the challenge is too great. Regardless of how difficult the challenge may be for someone, the underlying truth that the source of our joy and happiness can only come into our lives by accepting consequence remains.

The Bible tells us not to judge God. The essence of faith comes from not judging any part of God's creation as being bad. The essence of faith comes from not judging God's creation in any way. The essence of faith comes from accepting our consequences, without judgment, and having the knowledge that in the future we will eventually fully experience and appreciate all of God's blessings coming our way.

When we are enveloped in the "this should not be" conversation, our minds are incapable of appreciating God's blessings and abundance flowing all around us. We become blind and deaf to the blessings we are receiving in the present. The way to fully experience and fully appreciate God's blessings is by not having judgment.

The path to true joy, happiness, and enthusiasm is by not judging any part of God's creation as being bad. The path to true joy, happiness, and enthusiasm will come when we have the strongest conviction in the idea to get what we want we have to want what we have. The highest possible strength of faith in God will come when we are without judgment.




posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015





The essence of faith comes from not judging God's creation in any way. The essence of faith comes from accepting our consequences, without judgment, and having the knowledge that in the future we will eventually fully experience and appreciate all of God's blessings coming our way.


That sounds great but seems like a tall order if I am being robbed at knifepoint or being raped. Must I accept the consequences of being raped without fighting back ? Should I not judge the person or creation that is trying to murder me ?



posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 01:30 PM
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This is a very poignant reminder to keep our thoughts focused on positive ways to work through our challenges and not to fall pray to negative or defeatist thinking. Very uplifting post by you today!
edit on 2019/2/23 by Metallicus because: Fat Fingers



posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015




The idea of what causes enthusiasm to die can be summed up in the phrase, "this should not be." Whenever we think or feel, "this should not be," our spirit dies. Our enthusiasm dies. So how do we deal with this type of personal spiritual death?


I take the spirit killers on ATS with a grain of salt and don't hold a resentment. They are in sacred pain and to be pitied.



posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: dfnj2015




The idea of what causes enthusiasm to die can be summed up in the phrase, "this should not be." Whenever we think or feel, "this should not be," our spirit dies. Our enthusiasm dies. So how do we deal with this type of personal spiritual death?


I take the spirit killers on ATS with a grain of salt and don't hold a resentment. They are in sacred pain and to be pitied.


Lots of souls to be pitied on ATS .



posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 03:05 PM
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There Are Nine Colors aka Gates Of Hell...
Personal Things. Somewhat Masonic. But Fairly Christian.
They Progress In Order Of "Experience(s)"

Here Goes:
Purple: Obsession
Red: Frustration
Blue: Depression
Yellow: Phobia
Green: Aggravation (Or Jealousy)
Orange: Disorientation (Concoction: Curious, Doubtful, Confused...)
Brown: Apathetic (Overwhelmed; Can Lead To Suicide)
White: Anxiety (Panic Attacks, Shock)
Black: Psychosis (Hard To Come Back From...)

Deux (God) Wants To See Them In You To Know Your Heart.
Diabolux (Devil) Wants To See You Devoured By Them, Completely.

I Want To Show You It Is A Matter Of Strength. Depends Entirely And Wholeheartedly On Your "P.O.V." Of Any Given Situation Which Triggers These Malices. You Will Be Dependant On Your Own "Common Sense".

Stay Focused, Stay Aware, And Find The Light In Any Situation.

NOTE: "Point Of View" Will Save Your Asssssss....
edit on 23-2-2019 by Pinocchio because: Seek...



posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 03:15 PM
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originally posted by: Sheye

originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: dfnj2015




The idea of what causes enthusiasm to die can be summed up in the phrase, "this should not be." Whenever we think or feel, "this should not be," our spirit dies. Our enthusiasm dies. So how do we deal with this type of personal spiritual death?


I take the spirit killers on ATS with a grain of salt and don't hold a resentment. They are in sacred pain and to be pitied.


Lots of souls to be pitied on ATS .


So filled with anger and seeking revenge in their confusion.



posted on Feb, 23 2019 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: Sheye

originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: dfnj2015




The idea of what causes enthusiasm to die can be summed up in the phrase, "this should not be." Whenever we think or feel, "this should not be," our spirit dies. Our enthusiasm dies. So how do we deal with this type of personal spiritual death?


I take the spirit killers on ATS with a grain of salt and don't hold a resentment. They are in sacred pain and to be pitied.


Lots of souls to be pitied on ATS .


So filled with anger and seeking revenge in their confusion.


I don’t see them that way... just mostly confused about what truth really is.



posted on Feb, 24 2019 @ 09:14 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015

The highest possible strength of faith in God will come when we are without judgment.

That's just your judgment/evaluation of the situation, your opinion on the matter, your conclusion.

Definition from google for "judgment":

1. the ability to make considered decisions or come to sensible conclusions.
"an error of judgment"

- an opinion or conclusion.
"they make subjective judgments about children's skills"

Synonyms for "judgment" listed on thesaurus.com under the heading "analysis, noun. statement of results from examination":

estimation
evaluation
finding
interpretation
judgment
opinion


originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: dfnj2015

I take the spirit killers on ATS with a grain of salt and don't hold a resentment. They are in sacred pain and to be pitied.

That's your opinion/judgment on the matter, your evaluation of the situation.


originally posted by: Sheye
a reply to: olaru12

Lots of souls to be pitied on ATS .

That's your opinion/judgment on the matter, your evaluation of the situation.

Etc. Lots of opinions/judgments in this thread. The other definition for "judgment" listed on google doesn't seem to apply in this thread:

2. a misfortune or calamity viewed as a divine punishment.
"the crash had been a judgment on the parents for wickedness"
synonyms: punishment, retribution, penalty

Following his counsel about the need to seek God’s kingdom first, Jesus admonished his hearers to desist from a very harmful practice. He said: “Stop judging that you may not be judged.” (Matt. 7:1) According to Luke, Jesus added: “Stop condemning, and you will by no means be condemned. Keep on releasing, and you will be released. Practice giving, and people will give to you. They will pour into your laps a fine measure, pressed down, shaken together and overflowing.”​—Luke 6:37, 38.

During the first century C.E., the Pharisees tended to judge others harshly according to the false standards of non-Biblical traditions. Any of Jesus’ listeners who were in that habit were to “stop” it. Instead of continually finding fault with others, they should “keep on releasing,” that is, forgiving and overlooking the shortcomings of their fellowman. (Compare Luke 6:37, Authorized Version.) Doing so, they would impel others to reciprocate with the same forgiving attitude.

In addition to pardoning others and treating them mercifully, Jesus’ disciples were to “practice giving.” The more a person practices generosity, the more he encourages others to respond in kind.

Pointing to an important general principle, Jesus stated: “For with what judgment you are judging, you will be judged; and with the measure [way of dealing with people] that you are measuring out, they will measure out to you.” (Matt. 7:2) As to their treatment of others, people ‘reap what they sow,’ so to speak. This will prove to be true, not only in what they reap from fellow humans, but, more importantly, in what they reap from God.​—See Matthew 5:7; 6:14, 15.

To emphasize the danger of imitating the overcritical Pharisees, Jesus gave a twofold illustration: “A blind man cannot guide a blind man, can he? Both will tumble into a pit, will they not? A pupil is not above his teacher, but everyone that is perfectly instructed will be like his teacher.”​—Luke 6:39, 40.

It would be ridiculous for a literally blind person to try guiding another blind one over unfamiliar terrain. If there was a pit along the way, surely both would fall into it. When it came to judging their fellowman, the Jewish religious leaders were figuratively “blind.” (Compare Matthew 15:14; 23:16, 24.) They refused to take note of good qualities in the humble common people. On one occasion the Pharisees exclaimed: “This crowd that does not know the Law are accursed people.” (John 7:49) Anyone imitating such a condemnatory attitude is headed for dangerous pitfalls.

Too, just as “a pupil” who imbibes the thinking patterns of his teacher becomes “like his teacher,” so all who imitated the Pharisees would end up being like them​—out of God’s favor and in danger of losing their lives. Hence, Jesus said on another occasion:

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! because you shut up the kingdom of the heavens before men; for you yourselves do not go in, neither do you permit those on their way in to go in. Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! because you traverse sea and dry land to make one proselyte, and when he becomes one you make him a subject for Gehenna [eternal destruction] twice as much so as yourselves.”​—Matt. 23:13-15.

Pointing to the foolishness of being overcritical, Jesus asked: “Why, then, do you look at the straw in your brother’s eye, but do not consider the rafter in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Allow me to extract the straw from your eye’; when, look! a rafter is in your own eye?”​—Matt. 7:3, 4; compare Luke 6:41, 42a.

Jesus is not speaking merely of individuals who pay attention to the faults of others while having greater ones themselves, though this is a common human failing. Instead, he refers to someone who would take note of a minor defect in his brother’s “eye.” The critic would claim that his brother had impaired faculties of moral perception and judgment. Even if the fault was a minor one, like a “straw,” a sliver of wood or a speck of dust, the one criticizing would make an issue of it and hypocritically offer to “extract the straw,” that is, to aid the individual to see matters more clearly, enabling him to render more acceptable judgments.

The Jewish religious leaders were especially prone to criticize the judgment of others. For example, when a person whom Jesus healed from congenital blindness declared that Jesus must have come from God, the Pharisees retorted: “You were altogether born in sins, and yet are you teaching us?” (John 9:34) However, when it came to clear spiritual vision and ability to judge, the Pharisees had, as it were, “a rafter” in their own eye. They were altogether blind.

Hence, Jesus exclaimed: “Hypocrite! First extract the rafter from your own eye, and then you will see clearly how to extract the straw from your brother’s eye.”​—Matt. 7:5; Luke 6:42b.

Did this mean that disciples of Jesus were to use no discernment at all in connection with other people? No, for Jesus next said: “Do not give what is holy to dogs, neither throw your pearls before swine, that they may never trample them under their feet and turn around and rip you open.”​—Matt. 7:6.
edit on 24-2-2019 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2019 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: dfnj2015

I take the spirit killers on ATS with a grain of salt and don't hold a resentment. They are in sacred pain and to be pitied.


originally posted by: whereislogic
That's your opinion/judgment on the matter, your evaluation of the situation.


originally posted by: Sheye
a reply to: olaru12

Lots of souls to be pitied on ATS .


originally posted by: whereislogic
That's your opinion/judgment on the matter, your evaluation of the situation.
...
Pointing to the foolishness of being overcritical, Jesus asked: “Why, then, do you look at the straw in your brother’s eye, but do not consider the rafter in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Allow me to extract the straw from your eye’; when, look! a rafter is in your own eye?”​—Matt. 7:3, 4; compare Luke 6:41, 42a.

Jesus is not speaking merely of individuals who pay attention to the faults of others while having greater ones themselves, though this is a common human failing. Instead, he refers to someone who would take note of a minor defect in his brother’s “eye.” The critic would claim that his brother had impaired faculties of moral perception and judgment. ...

The Jewish religious leaders were especially prone to criticize the judgment of others. ... However, when it came to clear spiritual vision and ability to judge, the Pharisees had, as it were, “a rafter” in their own eye. They were altogether blind. ...

Would it be entirely inaccurate to conclude that olaru12, by referring to some people on ATS as "spirit killers", is at the very least putting into question their "faculties of moral perception and judgment"? Implying or suggesting by that term that these are "impaired", as it were? Similar to the notion that their souls are "to be pitied" (for that situation or state of their souls, spirits or mental attitudes and character attribute, these "impaired faculties of moral perception and judgment").

originally posted by: whereislogic
On one occasion the Pharisees exclaimed: “This crowd that does not know the Law are accursed people.” (John 7:49)

Like so-called "spirit killers on ATS" who "are in sacred pain and to be pitied" who perhaps do "not know" or agree with the idea or teaching that all forms of "judgment is [are] the death of human spirit"?
edit on 24-2-2019 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2019 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: whereislogic

Reject my opinion...it doesn't change anything. Just like I reject your opinion/evaluation opinion. However I did read it and didn't see the logic in your explanation. That's the problem with using the Bible; it requires faith and faith is the antithesis of logic.



posted on Feb, 25 2019 @ 01:17 PM
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originally posted by: whereislogic
Like so-called "spirit killers on ATS" who "are in sacred pain and to be pitied" who perhaps do "not know" or agree with the idea or teaching that all forms of "judgment is [are] the death of human spirit"?


Be careful not to combine or confuse the idea that although we cannot change what already is with the value of having a vision of the ideal. Having a vision of the ideal is very different than the emotional draining that occurs over having wants or excessive desires in changing what already is by not accepting it which for all practical purpose is impossible to change in the present, although if possible, may be different in the future.


edit on 25-2-2019 by dfnj2015 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2019 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015
Nice post dfnj2015.

I think you would enjoy a vid on youtube by Robert Wolfe called 'The Dis-ease of Should'....... it is not in the title but it is also the dis-ease of 'should not'.

Robert Wolfe wrote a book called 'Living Nonduality'.........and has a website with the same name.
edit on 26-2-2019 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 12:03 AM
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originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: whereislogic

That's the problem with using the Bible; it requires faith and faith is the antithesis of logic.

Among the definitions that one dictionary gives for faith is “firm and unquestioning belief in something for which there is no proof.” But, really, that definition more accurately describes credulity, a readiness to believe regardless of evidence. Credulity is really not faith. The faith in God the Creator that the Bible calls for, and for which it also furnishes the basis, is a faith based on clear evidence and sound reasoning.

Scientists are said to have faith in the basic principles governing their particular fields of knowledge. The farmer proceeds on what may be called faith in the regularity of the seasons. And many more examples could be given to show that men put their trust and faith in the dependability and regularity of the natural cycles and laws that govern the universe. Actually, this regularity in itself argues for the existence of an intelligent personal Creator. By measuring the movement of heavenly bodies on the basis of such natural laws, astronomers were able to determine the existence and location of certain planets before these were ever seen. Similarly, because of the regularity of what is called the periodic scale governing all chemical elements, certain scientists were able to tell of the existence of specific elements, and to describe their properties, before ever these elements were found. So why should not the scientists, the farmers and everyone else put their confidence and trust, yes, their faith, in the Maker of these natural laws?

As the Bible uses the term “faith,” it might be said to relate to two kinds of things: First, to the certainty of things hoped for, things not seen because of their being in the future. And, secondly, to faith in the existence of spirit beings, who are not visible to the human sight because of their not having material bodies; in other words, faith in God and in his promises. Thus we read at Hebrews 11:1 (New English Bible): “What is faith? Faith gives substance to our hopes, and makes us certain of realities we do not see.” That is why we are told that Christians must walk by faith and not by sight.​—2 Cor. 5:7.

Faith that God exists can be firmly established by contemplating the power and wisdom manifest in visible creation, including its order and harmony. All reasonable persons will agree that every effect has a competent cause. A watch argues for the existence of a watchmaker. So, look where we may in the universe, from the complex eye of an insect to the mighty galaxies in outer space, we come to the conclusion that there simply must be a mighty and wise Maker, or Creator, of these things.

Still the fact remains that a large number of persons do not believe that God exists. And since many of these persons are scientists, some individuals jump to the conclusion that to believe in the existence of God the Creator is unscientific. But not so, as a professor of the University of Pennsylvania once observed. In discussing the credibility of the miracles mentioned in the Bible, he said that a power of God not yet recognized by science could account for these. “Most scientists are not Christians,” he went on to say, “but not because they are scientists. Most businessmen or reporters are not Christians either; in fact, most people are not Christians.”

Pertinent here is a report that appeared some decades ago in the New York Journal-American. It stated: “For many years, scientists were generally believed to be atheists. Yet today, . . . when science is almost a way of life, this theory is no longer valid. This week, eight of the nation’s outstanding men of science were asked by the N.Y. Journal-American to give their views on this question: ‘Do scientists believe in God?’ From their answers, one basic concept shows up clearly: Some Divine Power, beyond control of man, has shaped the universe. Most of these scientific men first stated their feelings on this subject years ago. None have since seen any reason to change their views.”

Wernher von Braun, rocket expert, and one of the eight referred to, replied: “Why do I believe in God? Simply stated, the main reason is this: Anything as well ordered and perfectly created as is our earth and universe must have a Maker, a master designer. Anything so orderly, so perfect, so precisely balanced, so majestic as this creation can only be the product of a Divine Idea. There must be a Maker; there can be no other way.”

Another of the eight scientists, Dr. William Swann, a noted authority on cosmic radiation, expressed himself in a like manner: “The man of science likes to separate fact from speculation. Now viewing the universe as a whole, I cannot escape the fact that it is of intelligent design. By this I mean that the universe shows on a magnificent scale the same kind of interrelationship of its working and efficiency of planning as an engineer strives to achieve in his smaller undertakings.”

Similarly, scientist Dr. Warren Weaver, one of America’s foremost mathematicians, once stated in a popular monthly magazine: “Every new discovery of science is a further revelation of the order that God has built into His universe. God gains in dignity and power through manifestations of His reason and order.”

Then there is also the testimony of Sir Isaac Newton, who has been termed “the greatest scientific mind the world has ever seen.” To quote a recently published biography, “Newton’s scrutiny of nature was directed almost exclusively to the knowledge of God” and “science was pursued for what it could teach men about God.” All such testimony, which could be multiplied a thousand times over, is in keeping with the inspired words of the apostle Paul that God’s “invisible qualities are clearly seen from the world‘s creation onward, because they are perceived by the things made, even his eternal power and Godship, so that they [who deny God’s existence, by word or action] are inexcusable.”​—Rom. 1:20.

Isaac Newton's science/scientia/knowledge about reality

And where did Newton get his information about God from?

However, let us bear in mind that mere belief that God exists is not enough. That is not the same as having a true and living faith in God himself. For example, the results of a poll published late in 1976 showed that 76 percent of Australians “believe in God.” But do they actually believe in what God says and in what God does, or do they merely believe that he exists? According to the Bible writer James, even wicked angels, demons or devils, believe that God exists​—and they shudder. Obviously they do not have faith in God. (Jas. 2:14, 19) True faith in God involves not merely the belief that he exists but also trust and confidence in God as a person. As the Bible puts it: “Without faith it is impossible to please him well, for he that approaches God must believe that he is and [additionally] that he becomes the rewarder of those earnestly seeking him.” (Heb. 11:6) Faith involves not only the mind but also the heart, yes, the whole man.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

Obviously, a sound faith in God requires us to go farther than the study of the so-called “book of Nature.” As much as “nature,” creation, is able to testify to the majesty, wisdom and power of the Creator, it cannot answer such questions as: What is God’s name? Why did he create us, and when? What is the purpose of life? What is our ultimate destiny? What are our duties toward God and toward our fellowman? Why is the world in such a mess? And what does God require of us if we are to survive the impending world disaster foretold in his Word?

Just think: The Creator gave us the power to reason, to wonder, to use our imagination and to ask questions such as these. Surely he would not torment us by leaving us without the answers, would he? Truly God has implanted in our hearts and minds a thirst for knowledge, and certain kinds of knowledge that only he can supply. Does it not make sense to conclude that God would satisfy our thirst for knowledge about these things? After all, he created us with other natural desires​—for food and drink, for beauty of sight and sound, and so forth. And has he not provided that we can, with due effort, satisfy these hungers and thirsts? Besides, the Creator provided for all the needs of the brute creation. Does he love his intelligent human creation any less? It is but logical that he would provide us with the answers​—by means of a divine revelation. The Bible claims to be such, and as we examine it we find that it does indeed meet the requirements of a divine revelation.

The Bible has well been termed the torch of civilization and of liberty. Such parts of it as the Decalogue or Ten Commandments, the Sermon on the Mount, and its psalms and proverbs, would alone suffice to put it in a class by itself. For example, the Ten Commandments have often been likened to the Code of Hammurabi, as though the Commandments were patterned after that Code. Nothing could be farther from the truth. These Commandments put the emphasis on the worship of Jehovah God; but the Hammurabi Code, on mere secular matters. And even in the treatment of secular matters there is a great difference. Not only do the Ten Commandments forbid murder, but the rest of the Mosaic law makes the death penalty imperative for willful murder and distinguishes between murder and unintentional manslaying. (Num. 35:9-34) By contrast, in the Code of Hammurabi, as the Encyclopædia Britannica points out, “a strange omission from the code is that of willful murder, and there is uncertainty as to how it was punished or by whom the retribution was inflicted.” (Encyclopædia Britannica, 1971, Vol. 11, page 43) Note also the last of the Ten Commandments, “You shall not covet.” (Ex. 20:17, NE) That law is unique in the annals of jurisprudence. It is a law that gets at the very root of crime, and yet its enforcement depends in large measure on the individual himself!

Logically, the Bible begins with the account of creation. It may be said to have anticipated the desire of Albert Einstein, who once stated: “I want to know how God created this world. . . . I want to know His thoughts.” Though the fact is not generally appreciated, the Bible account of creation is in harmony with the thinking of many scientists today.

In this regard, note the words of one of America’s leading geologists, Wallace Pratt: “If I as a geologist were called upon to explain briefly our modern ideas of the origin of the earth and the development of life on it to a simple, pastoral people, such as the tribes to whom the Book of Genesis was addressed, I could hardly do better than follow rather closely much of the language of the first chapter of Genesis.” And as regards the length of the days of creation mentioned in Genesis, this scientist discerningly asks: “Are we not assured, indeed, that with the Creator, ‘a day is as a thousand years and a thousand years as a day?’” (not to be literally applied to the days mentioned in Genesis, as in exactly 1,000 years each) How could the writer of the Genesis account have obtained this information and understanding except by divine inspiration?

More than that, Bible writers show a candor that stamps their accounts as authentic. Thus no one can properly ascribe any ulterior motive to them. Consider what the Bible tells of the mistakes and shortcomings of even great men of faith. It tells about Noah’s getting drunk; about the patriarch Judah’s having relations with one whom he thought to be a temple prostitute; about Moses’ losing his temper; about David’s mistakes, such as his adulterous affair with Bath-sheba, resulting also in the death of her husband; and about the rivalry of the apostles of Jesus. Certainly in thus frankly describing, not only the virtues of these faithful men, but also their failings, Bible writing bears the stamp of honesty and truth.

How true to life is human nature as portrayed in the Bible! There has been very little change in six thousand years. For example, near the start of the Divine Record we come face to face with the human failing of jealousy. The firstborn son of Adam and Eve kills his brother because of jealous rage. Later in history a like jealousy motivates the half brothers of Joseph to get rid of him. King Saul is jealous of David’s successes and popularity to the point of trying to kill him. In its treatment of the realities of life, in these and a multitude of other instances, the Bible record rings true.

Moreover, we might naturally expect that the Bible, as God’s revelation to humankind, would have the widest circulation of any book​—and in the most languages—​so that it would be available to the greatest number of persons living on earth. And that we find to be the case. In 1975 alone a third of a billion copies of the Bible or parts of it were distributed, and in 1977 the Bible was available in whole or in part in upward of 1,575 languages.

The strongest reason, however, for some people accepting the Bible’s claim to being the Divine Revelation​—which claim it makes repeatedly—​is the fulfillment of so many of its prophecies. Literally scores of the details about the birth, public activities and death of Jesus Christ were foretold by the Hebrew prophets. Among these are the place of his birth, facts regarding when he would appear as the Messiah and his public career for three and a half years, how he was received, as well as details of his death and resurrection. (Gen. 49:10; Isa. 53; Dan. 9:26; Mic. 5:2; Zech. 9:9; 11:12; 13:7) And let it be noted that even as faith in God means having faith in his Word, the Bible, so faith in the Bible means having faith in Jesus Christ as the Savior of humankind and the King of God’s kingdom.

The BIBLE - Accurate History,Reliable Prophecy



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

God created man and made him a living Soul not a living spirit. there is no mention of a Human Spirit located anywhere in the Authorized Bible.

You suggestion of accepting our consequences will in deed lead many straight to hell.



posted on Mar, 2 2019 @ 05:00 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Job 10:8-12.

You granted me life and favor,
And Your care has preserved my spirit.



posted on Mar, 3 2019 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: Itisnowagain

spirit here is the life force not the whole being. The whole person is not just the life force, it is the personality, and body and the life force that makes up what is called the SOUL.


Ge 2:7 And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.
Now each of us is born in the fallen image of Adam we are souls not spirits.

I hope that clarifies what the difference between a soul and a spirit. Spirits are also known as ghosts, but the ghost is not the whole person they are just the spirit and the personality with no body. Just like the Holy Ghost is not the full person of the godhead.


edit on 3/3/2019 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2019 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
The purpose of religion is to provide a context in which we can live a meaningful, joyful, and rewarding lives.


I have my doubts.



posted on Mar, 16 2019 @ 08:01 PM
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a reply to: Itisnowagain

preserved his LIFE. Learn to rightly divide and you would have seen that. the Soul is the personality, the body is you shell and the spirit is the life. All three in the end will be eternal at the Resurrection of the dead to be judged. But if you are saved then you were already judged and just lack fruit to lay down at the feet of Jesus when it comes to studying the word of Truth.




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