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The Hawk and The Crows: A Fable

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posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 12:05 PM
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Good morning/afternoon/evening ATS fellows
This thread comes with (what I consider, lol...) a fun challenge.
I've been reading an illustrated copy of Aesop's Fables, and am amazed by the wisdom contained within. If this thread gets any interest, I'll post some of my favorites from Aesop (and encourage you to do so as well).

I've been trying out different literary techniques and styles, and thought I'd try to write my own fable. It was not as easy as I had hoped.

In fact, without witnessing the events I'm about to relate right when I was considering this challenge, I may never have succeeded. As luck would have it, I watched the following skirmish unfold, and was encouraged to complete my fable.

Maybe you could help me choose from the two morals I wrote.
Is it only me, or can you apply the small scene to current events happening today? (Because that is exactly where my mind took me-- I really do see the American public the victim of small, relentless, coodinated attacks. I'll explain later if anyone's interested.
)

Hope this thread piques your interest, whether it encourages you to write your own fable, to check out Aesop again, or to simply go outside and see what lessons nature has to teach today.

Have a great day, friends.


The Hawk and The Crows


One morning Hawk found herself suddenly at the mercy of a small band of attacking Crows. In her confusion, she landed in a terribly prone position- high on a ledge and with no protection from directed assaults by her circling enemies. She cowered on her perch, her proud bearing gone, at times flinching as her attackers relentlessly dove, missing her by mere inches and from varying angles. “What a woe," Hawk thought to herself, "to be cowed by such ignoble, diminutive creatures. If only I had some fellows with me; we would teach these creatures to show respect where nature commands it!”
Isolation is its own peril.
Never underestimate the efficacy of a determined and coordinated attack

edit on 14-2-2019 by zosimov because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: zosimov


I think the second moral is more appropriate for these days.

One thing that I have noticed:
Two people hear the very same story.
One turns to the other and says, "That is a perfect image of how you act."
The other says, "What? That's you to a tee!"

------------
Moral: There are conspiracies in process that people notice; then again there are conspiracy theories that people project upon others.



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: pthena

You know, I favor the second one also, and am glad for your input.


I couldn't agree more with your observation of the times. If we weren't stuck right in the middle of this zeitgeist it would make for a fascinating study.

Hope today is a good one for you, friend!



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: zosimov

Thank you. Good day to you.
The snow is melting.
Now I can take my recycling out. Yaaa! It will take two trips, been building up



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: zosimov


Try some Joseph Campbell.

When listening to him or reading his book, there is an "unfolding" where an idea grows to the universal. That is where the true power of the moral comes into play.

For example, did this ever cross your mind: terrorism. Your fable is about a [war] hawk cowering in fear from dark forces attacking it. Sounds like something right from the news, huh? Fear of the other.

Or maybe I had too much coffee this morning!

Thanks for sharing! And giving me half of a thought!




posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Awesome interpretation, thank you!

I could also see this from a positive perspective as advice on how to tackle a problem (determination, coordinated attack from different angles, community).

Have a great day



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

That was going to be my response. I just borrowed a dvd of The Power of Myth with J. Campbell and Bill Moyers, along with a few books about shamanism and gnosticism. Fascinating material...it speaks directly to my soul.



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: zosimov

Hi Zosimov, long time no see.

My two cents...If hawk was shown to be arrogant/condescending/belligerent toward crow in some sort of "setup" scene, hawk's consequent vulnerability would seem more just.


edit on 14/2/2019 by DictionaryOfExcuses because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

Hey there DOE, nice to see ya!

Excellent feedback, thank you. In fact, most of Aesop's do indeed more closely resemble your suggested addition, in that most of the animals have put themselves into their bad position rather than being victims of cruel fate.



Have a great night!



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 01:03 AM
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a reply to: zosimov


or to simply go outside and see what lessons nature has to teach today.


I've decided to take you up on this part of the challenge, but I have to cheat in order to make it at all interesting. I cheat by relating an anecdote from 7 years ago.

I lived on the main floor of a house with cellar and attic which had been converted into a 4 apartment rental shortly after WWII. The conversion process was shortly after WWII, not my residency there. I'm not quite that old.

The lady who lived in one of the cellar apartments below me had the habit of throwing broken pieces of bread out of her kitchen window in order to feed the squirrels.

I was out on the front entryway one morning having a smoke and watching the squirrels. A raven flew down from his perch on the power line over the front street, snatched a chunk of bread and flew back up to his perch. After consuming the morsel, he flew back down, eyed me for a bit, then approached another chunk of bread.

"Hey, that's for the squirrels!" I called out.

The raven stopped, watched a squirrel digging in the lawn, then started scratching at the ground and lowering his head. Then he looked at me until the squirrel he had been mimicking ran across the yard and up the plum tree next to the fence. He then followed; across the yard and up the tree. If you have ever seen a raven walking up a tree while watching you over his shoulder then you would know why I burst out laughing.

"Okay, good job." I said, still laughing, "you deserve a squirrel's treat."

He hopped to the ground, grabbed the chunk of bread that was still waiting for him and flew back up to the power line.
--------
I can't think of a good moral to the story.
Maybe: Once you have been paid for your act, don't forget to be yourself. Squirrels can't fly.
edit on 15-2-2019 by pthena because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: zosimov

I just re-read my post and realized i've lost some of my social skill while away from ats. I didnt inntend to come off like i was criticizing you.



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

Not at all DOE! I appreciated your critique (it wasn't critical though)... REALLY. It was a great observation and just the type of stuff that gets me thinking more, wanting to write more.


edit on 15-2-2019 by zosimov because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: pthena

LOL

That is the funniest story and must have been a delight to watch.

I like your moral


Thanks for taking the challenge!



posted on Feb, 16 2019 @ 07:50 AM
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I like your fable zosimove!

I am curious as to why you chose a female for the hawk or perhaps that part is totally irrelevant to the main message?

This has style and I like your choice of word diminuitive near the end. I dont think Ive ever used that word.

Also the ending statement is fabulous and so true!



posted on Feb, 16 2019 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: Trucker1

Hi Trucker!

Thank you, and I'm very glad you liked the read! Interesting question about the hawk... when I watched the harrassed hawk, I got a distinct idea that it was a female though I have no evidence either way. It did make me feel more protective of her, though.

I really appreciate the interesting feedback from everyone! And also thank you for helping me choose the moral. I agree with you and pthena that the second one is the winner.

Have a great day!



posted on Feb, 16 2019 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: zosimov


What if the Hawk ate Crow?



posted on Feb, 16 2019 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

It would certainly change the outcome! And the moral.






posted on Feb, 16 2019 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: zosimov


I did like your fable however and I shall be watchful that a murder of crows doesn't catch me unawares.



posted on Feb, 16 2019 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Now that would be a sight! You could add a few feathers to your fedora once the epic match was over.



posted on Feb, 17 2019 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus


What if the Hawk ate Crow?


I see what you did there


If Raven parents caught Hawk approaching their nest and younglings, Hawk would end up eating Crow.
see: Common_raven#Predation







 
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