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Does the Bell toll for the A380?

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posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Imagine a timeline where the MD-12 entered service in 1995 and saved the company.




posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 12:01 PM
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I've seen pop writeups claiming the Prez of Airbus has confirmed the A380 line is closing in 2021.



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: anzha

newatlas.com...



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 07:02 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Forensick

Travel is increasing, but with the Max and other long range narrowbodies, there's less hub and spoke and more point to point. Even if they put a new engine on it, production is dead, and several customers are talking about early retirement of their aircraft.


Yeah just seen that, dead in the water. Shame but a typical EU vanity project and Airbus thinking they can make the horses drink the water.

Should have made a cargo version.



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: Forensick

I was always surprised that they didn't. It only makes sense as a freighter.



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 04:14 AM
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Super Guppy Conversion?



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 05:55 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
The freighter version died because it was going to be crap as a freighter, that's why FedEx cancelled their order. I forget the exact technical reason, it was to do with payload versus fuel load but basically a 747 freighter is better. Funnily enough though a number of early aircraft were actually built as 380-F's including at least one for QF (VH-OQD I think), but were completed as -800's after the failure of the freighter version. I was told what the difference was at the time, Ill see if I can ask the brains trust what the differences are and get back to you.

edit on 15-2-2019 by thebozeian because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2019 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

They'd look pretty darn cool in Atlas/Kalitta livery...



posted on Feb, 16 2019 @ 03:48 PM
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originally posted by: thebozeian
a reply to: Zaphod58
The freighter version died because it was going to be crap as a freighter, that's why FedEx cancelled their order. I forget the exact technical reason, it was to do with payload versus fuel load but basically a 747 freighter is better. Funnily enough though a number of early aircraft were actually built as 380-F's including at least one for QF (VH-OQD I think), but were completed as -800's after the failure of the freighter version. I was told what the difference was at the time, Ill see if I can ask the brains trust what the differences are and get back to you.


Just did some googling, apparently it was 2.3 containers wide (or some such width) meaning wasted space.

The floor is structural leaving configuration issues.

It cannot travel full as a full load would weight too much (suppose it depends on what you are carrying).

Has COG issues...

So probably would have been better if it were designed as a freighter and then configured for people but then it would have taken airbus longer to get to market.

Sounds like a complete cluster **** from start to finish really!



posted on Feb, 17 2019 @ 05:24 AM
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Two things I was reading up on. Cannot verify the accuracy. Anyone?

1. The scrap value of an A380 is c. $40M with the engines at $6M a piece. Many parts can be reused elsewhere.
2. Airbus has lost between $25-$30 bn in the project.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 03:33 PM
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www.flightglobal.com...

Air France will retire its A380's by 2022



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Forensick

I was always surprised that they didn't. It only makes sense as a freighter.


It does but as noted the palate configuration was not optimal unlike the base 747 which was designed with them being ALL converted to freighters once the Concord came into service. Plus the hinged nose is a huge deal as well



posted on Aug, 26 2019 @ 01:44 PM
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Speaking of A380s, Emirates just tore one to hell during an A check. The aircraft was on jacks, with the nose gear retracted or removed (I'm betting removed based on the picture) and fell off the jacks. It suffered extensive damage to the radome and nose gear doors, and probably significant damage under the skin.



www.flightglobal.com...



posted on Aug, 26 2019 @ 05:02 PM
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Definitely some bulkhead damage...



posted on Aug, 26 2019 @ 06:07 PM
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Given that used A380 can be had for dirt cheap and many Non Emirates planes do not have that many cycles on them I may be cheaper to buy one fo those and move the interior

According to reports on twitter


FATIII Aviation
According to our source, this is A6-EOP and it happened on 22AUG. Seems like someone retracted the gear without the pin inserted and the aircraft was not on a support stanchion.


Looks like someone was NOT following the checklist if true



posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: FredT
Fred this is the exact speculation myself and a colleague had yesterday. We are on A-330 type course training currently so not getting all the rumors but we know the A-380 backwards. We reckon we know the exact test they were performing and the sequence of events, its pretty clear to us. Basically for the last couple of years there has been a regular call out to test the alternate extension of the landing gear and doors. It involves using the alternate extend switches in the cockpit which is based on a mechanical timer mechanism to ensure it will work. Emirates had an aircraft a few years back that needed to use it and when it did it only partially worked, hence the need for regular testing as well as a mod program for some of the up lock wiring harnesses. It seems some Muppet when asked had he fitted all the locks said "oh yes!" but was only referring to the nose gear door actuator locks, NOT the gear down lock pin. Clearly no one did an independent walk around and when it came to that part of the test they selected gear up and the nose collapsed. That would explain why the forward nose gear doors were in the open position. Whats not explainable is why the main deck door 1 left was open during the test which was unceremoniously ripped off and can be seen lying on the docking above.

Emirates has a habit of paying low wages and except for getting a few Anglo-Europeans as senior licensed engineers, tends to hire most of their workforce from the sub continental region and parts of SE Asia so I'm little surprised this happened.



posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: Blackfinger
Just forward of the forward pressure bulkhead below the cockpit.



posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 07:39 AM
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In a way it's a shame the age of large 4 engined aircraft will soon come to an end. It makes sense though with improving engine and aircraft technology being more efficient and money saving. What I'm going to miss isn't the 380s or 747s I'm going to miss the 340s. Something about those aircraft that I love just can't put my finger in it



posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: ThePeaceMaker
Well I hate to say it but you would be in a very small group of people. Most engineers despise that thing, if its not the asthmatic 300-400 series its the ridiculous fuel consumption on the 600. I believe a time will come when 4 engined VLA's will be needed again in about 15-20 years. The 777X in the -9 form is probably as practically large as you can go without a second deck, and that will mean 4 engines.



posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 03:32 PM
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According to Emirates the aircraft fell off the jacks during the check process.



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