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Investing: Avoiding Working Until You Die

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posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: hiddeninsite

Robinhood has the same access to stocks and ETFs as nearly any other exchange system. It's just not typically used by professionals.

I have a Robinhood account. I also use my brokerage account at my online bank.

For serious trading I recommend TD, Tradestation, and eoption for derivatives trading.

But you're going to pay for your trades. For small investors bank brokerages (not every bank has this) or "fee-free" services like Robinhood are a perfectly safe way to go and a lot more forgiving. The format is much simpler and it doesn't bombard you with information all at once. Information is also easier to find.

This is another reason I like information sites like Investopedia. They format their information for easy consumption and then offer more in-depth explanations.




posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 08:57 PM
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originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: projectvxn

I have a simple strategy now, move money from stocks (S&P 500 only) to t-bills and bonds , wait for the crash, move money back to stocks until I think it has peaked, move back to bonds wait for crash repeat.



How much are t-bills interest these days



posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: musicismagic

Yield these days is 2.40 average discounted rate.



posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 10:03 PM
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I have never really understood how technical analysis of stock prices can be profitable. No-one can manually out trade an algorithm that makes trades in milliseconds of millions of shares for just pennies in profit per share. From a statistical standpoint a stock or option price has a 50 percent chance of being either up or down in any millisecond, second, minute, hour, day, month or year and on and on.

Insider information can be definitely profitable, which I think is occurring with people that have become very wealthy from trading.



posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: eManym

it's really about having a diversified portfolio with a little options/ day trading mixed in

I don't have this kind of capital built up yet but ideally my portfolio (once I finish school) will be gold/silver (long game) dependent on the Fed and the credit/business cycle. Dividend stocks or companies I believe in (Warren Buffet), collectibles like art and baseball cards and then I like risky betting on options trading that's really my favorite



posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 11:14 PM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: musicismagic

Yield these days is 2.40 average discounted rate.



Thanks, not much but ... Can you still get 30 day t-bills?



posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 11:41 PM
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a reply to: musicismagic

There's still data available for 30 day T-bills.

ycharts.com...



posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 11:47 PM
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gold has leveled off I wonder if there's talk of an interest rate hike in the near future behind the scenes, looks like it might be getting priced into the market

maybe if the DOW breaks 26000



posted on Feb, 12 2019 @ 11:50 PM
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Gold does not always glitter.



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 12:26 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Investing in the stock market alone is not a good idea.

First, the financial sector has it sewn up. Their quants move millions in and out in the blink of an eye. We get the leavings. the crumbs after the feast.

Second, quick gains can also mean quick losses. You quote Eyenovia at 630 in your post of Sunday. I see Eyenovia closed yesterday at 511. A 19% drop. If a company is delisted, you lose it all.

Third, the US economy is a bubble again. Like in 2006, and like in 1927, the stock market seems exciting and bursting with potential - any schmuck can make a killing! Until the bubble bursts, when the only people who were still smiling were Wall Street. To make things worse, the American financial sector is tending to deregulation again, which makes it less risky for them and much more risky for us. Remember, these people make money whether the market goes up or down.

Back in 2003, I got a 60% return. When interest rates are low, it is even easier to outperform a savings account.

By all means dabble and, like you say, do your research. I'd go further - don't blindly trust the investment advice from brokers because individuals often outperform institutional investors. Work out your own strategy. Have fun. Every once in a while, take a mad gamble with money you know you can afford to lose.

Most importantly, diversify. If it's legal, consider it.

Me, I'm out of the stock market for a while. I have a couple of bellweather investments that have been jittery for a few months so I cashed in. Some I've put into Euros, some as a cash reserve with an eye on another property, hoping to ride the Brexit wave.
edit on 13-2-2019 by Whodathunkdatcheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 12:32 AM
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deleted because I had fat fingers
edit on 13-2-2019 by Whodathunkdatcheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 12:36 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn


I hate that a whole generation of people my age can't seem to shake the disease of debt and frivolous spending.




Amen

...but it ain't just your generation. It's been happening since the 1980s.



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 12:41 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: projectvxn

We were the losers in 2008 and do you know what? we won't do that again.


Maybe just maybe...



One more hit before I take everyone down.



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 02:41 AM
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a reply to: eManym



I have never really understood how technical analysis of stock prices can be profitable.


Well, being that it's used in practically every trading firm in the US, it's obviously profitable.



No-one can manually out trade an algorithm that makes trades in milliseconds of millions of shares for just pennies in profit per share.


Sure they can. They can't trade faster but they can easily make more. Algo firms go under all of the time.



From a statistical standpoint a stock or option price has a 50 percent chance of being either up or down in any millisecond, second, minute, hour, day, month or year and on and on.


Sure, without any other data that's accurate but that's the point of TA. To provide other data.
EDIT: Actually that's incorrect. From a statistical standpoint a stock or option price has a 33% chance of being up, a 33% chance of being down, and a 33% chance of staying the same.

In my experience, CAN SLIM is the best strategy for most of your everyday, retail traders.
edit on 13-2-2019 by Dfairlite because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 02:49 AM
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a reply to: Whodathunkdatcheese

First, I've made 45% in the last two and a half years on my 401k. I'll take those "crumbs."

Second, there are plenty of warning signs before delisting and delisting doesn't necessarily mean you lose it all. I recouped about half of one of my greysheets. Plus, if it's delisted on the NYSE it usually goes OTC then pinksheets, then really gets delisted and goes grey.

Third, post a chart. Where is the bubble? Have you gone short yet? Why not?



don't blindly trust the investment advice from brokers because individuals often outperform institutional investors.


That's just flat out wrong. Greater than 90% of individual investors lose money because they don't know what they're doing and they're overly emotional. If 90% of brokers were losing money, the economy would be screwed. That said, you're right about not blindly following what your broker says. But you should also know your limits.



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn

You missed the best broker with the best tools. Interactive brokers. Plus they are catering to young people. As long as you trade $3 worth of commissions a month there are no maintenance fees for people under 25. Not that their maintenance fees are much, $10 and they're waived for a variety of reasons (high account balances, trade more than $10 worth of commissions in a month, etc). Plus their commissions are dirt cheap. It's .25 per options contract and you don't have the issues with getting delayed fills like you have with the discount brokerage firms.
edit on 13-2-2019 by Dfairlite because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: Dfairlite

Haven't used them yet. I can only comment on what I have experience with.



posted on Feb, 13 2019 @ 11:43 PM
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22 trillion today

market isn't going above 25,000

I'm buying call options on Cisco, PGE and I might get some put options on Ford and other auto's not sure I gotta look at the earnings reports and Ford I think is going to take some hits

also I might pickup some gaming stocks
edit on 13-2-2019 by toysforadults because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 01:48 AM
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new plan if Cisco gap ups tomorrow and I can't catch the call on it I'm buying 30 day put options for the correction but it's super super stable stock, I'm long their stock but I'm expecting a larger market correction in the near future similar to the end of last year

so Cisco calls or puts depending on when they gap up

puts on Ford

puts on ZYNDRA or whatever that gaming stock is and maybe calls on NVIDIA if I miss the gap down

staying out of anything that's not options the market is highly unstable... I'm also looking at auto subprime right now to see if there's anything going on I can catch there I really wanna catch the auto subprime bubble


edit on 14-2-2019 by toysforadults because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2019 @ 02:28 AM
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Buying blue chip stocks is not going to get you rich. You need serious money in order to make decent profit off a blue chip.

The goal is to do your DD and find a stock that will become a blue chip

Also, my advice for a new investor is to learn and individual sector first. Gold, Uranium, Oil, Tech, Healthcare, Finance....

It can be overwhelming to try to get a grasp on the all sectors so if you can key in on what companies are leaders in the sector and what companies have potential you will have a good chance

A majority of companies don’t make money, most resource stocks (explorers) raise capital to drill in hopes of hitting something. This creates dilution by expanding the float (amount of shares). However, if you do your DD and find a junior that has good land in a good jurisdiction close to operating mines then you may be able to hit it big!




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