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Nick Cook - the Hunt for Zero Point

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posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 01:04 PM
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I've tried searching ATS but have yet to find any threads that discuss this book in any depth; if there's been a good "let's pick this apart" thread I haven't seen it. Has anyone gone ahead and done some verification of names / dates / etc. from this book to make sure that it at least superficially checks out? It might make a good ATS research project if no one has yet.

The book is here at amazon.com:

The Hunt For Zero Point

and here's another site on the same book:

www.americanantigravity.com...

The executive summary of the book's claims:

* around 1955 or so there was a brief media excitement over the prospects of antigravity technology
* almost immediately excitement disappeared entirely, a pattern consistent with projects "going black"
* some of the technology the nazis had been working on had been antigravity related (and also, perhaps, zero-point related, though they may not have known that at the time)
* whatever antigrav work is done is kept entirely under wraps in a deadly serious fashion -- apprently the national security apparatus wasn't pleased with how quickly the atomic bomb spread to russia and others
* podletnkov's father had a collection of schauberger's papers
* antigrav is something "easy" to make if you know what you're doing, but not something you're likely to stumble across by accident if you don't know what to do
* apparently zero-point + gravity go hand in hand -- solve one and you solve the other, more or less

What's really interesting is how many names get named -- companies long since bought and incorporated into larger firms, some of the researchers involved, etc., which leaves this book's claims potentially more verifiable than pretty much anything else I've read. So again: has anyone already made a real attempt to go through and verify the claims in this book in any detailed fashion?




posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 03:19 PM
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While I don't have the time to disect "Hunt" or check on dates and names I have read the book and found it very interesting.

While I am generally a skeptic of most things considered "bad science", the concept of anti-gravity has me intrigued and in fact it was my desire for some kind of reconciliation between things I have seen and real-life, factual science that initially brought me to ATS.

Since I am employed by an aerospace company that has close relations with the DoD I was already familiar with Nick Cook's writings in Janes Defense Weekly, He is generally considered to be a first class reporter.

Mr. Cook certainly brings up points and information that invite your consideration, but I am torn between thinking that he actually stumbled onto a real-life ultra-high tech conspiracy and thinking perhaps Mr Cook may have seen how well his fellow Janes reporter Bill Sweetman did with his "Aurora" book and thus decided to do something similar... Hence, "The Hunt for Zero Point"...

I think one thing that has me actually leaning in the direction of believing him is that he has penned a few articles along similar lines as the "Hunt", and these have been published in reputable aerospace and industry magazines, not the National Enquirer or some other nonsensical publication.

Anyone who is curious about advanced technology or UFO's should probably give the book a read.



[edit on 28-2-2005 by intelgurl]



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 03:31 PM
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Seems like an interesting read... maybe I buy it, even if i dont thanks for the info Sisonek.



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 04:46 PM
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I read the book after seeing the Discovery Channel Doc about it. The documentary covers all of the books salient points and leaves out some of the drier stuff. Knowing nothing about this subject, I found it fascinating largely due to Cook's credibility as a Jane's reporter.

I was also actually embarassed to be seen reading it because of its cheesy sci-fi cover. When I bought it at Chapters it was filed in the Mystical/New Age section. It's not cheesy sci-fi and its not New Age. Its science.



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 05:38 PM
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thanks intelgurl, that's pretty much all the answer I was looking for; verifying names + dates in his book would be a lengthy enough process that I certainly don't have time for it, and it looks like no one else has, either -- not surprising if it took 10 years to write.

For the record, though, I've got enough background to spot bad science when I see it. I find it hard to believe offhand that he's able to report on aerospace for Jane's well enough to have a great reputation and simultaneously be as scientifically clueless as he claims in the book; if he's not just making stuff up I assume he's being vague on the 'science' to give himself some CYA protection. That point aside, the places (outside of the hutchinson effect) where he describes the 'antigravity' stuff are all within the realm of "far-out-scientific plausibility":

the schauberger implosion stuff seems like essentially a way to achieve high levels of compression (within the center of his 'imposion votices') w/out requiring obscenely thick containing walls to hold it in; it isn't entirely impossible that at sufficent levels of compression you get some weird form of matter -- like a high temperature / high pressure version of Bose-Einstein condensate -- that lets you extend quantum effects to macroscale levels. if instead of water you use some sort of metallic fluid / vapor then it's also not inconceivable that you could "communicate" electrically with the condensate in the center of the 'imposion vortex', whereas this is pretty impossible in a more standard compression chamber: securing the opening for your communication probe to go from exterior -> interior is very difficult, and whatever probe you use will have to stand up to the uniformly high pressure stuff inside.

simlarly, the other anti-grav stuff mentioned all involves tons of rotation, which again it's not hard to see as somehow compressing something-or-other (in the superconductor maybe the electrons) and possibly forcing it into some special kind state of matter. although I'd have to see hard proof that this works -- and if it does the difficulty replicating podliknov (sp?)'s results indicates this is a really delicate process -- it's just barely within the realm of possibility (until proven otherwise) and thus hard to writeoff without further data.

Hence my interest in seeing if someone else has gone through the book and seen how much of the verifiable stuff checks out; unlike most of the books I've read that touch on this sort of thing "Hunt" at least sounds mildly believable.



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 05:48 PM
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I have heard of this stuff before, VERY interesting. Several months ago i stumbled upon this website that made insane claims: they claim to have found zero point AND they claim to have built some sort of gravity altering device for their "Spacecraft" lol. Good stuff

www.evolvedtechnology.com...



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 07:19 PM
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I have read it, it is a very good read. A nice mix of science and penmenship that keeps it interesting.

Unfortunatly, I can't verify any of the science - part of what made that book enjoyable for me was that Cook is a legit journalist, and not some nut case. He does have a reputation to uphold, so I doubt anything he said was blatantly untrue (as far as the science goes).

Overall, I give this book



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 11:20 PM
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I came across the book by total accident....
what an amazing book!!!
mr.cook as you know is a writer for Janes Defense Weekly....dont get much better than that!!



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by American Mad Man
I have read it, it is a very good read. A nice mix of science and penmenship that keeps it interesting.

Unfortunatly, I can't verify any of the science - part of what made that book enjoyable for me was that Cook is a legit journalist, and not some nut case. He does have a reputation to uphold, so I doubt anything he said was blatantly untrue (as far as the science goes).

Overall, I give this book


Aye, those were my thoughts, too.



posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 03:37 PM
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The Hunt for Zero Point is my all time favorite book. I got it about a year ago and have read it so much that I have had to glue my copy back together on more than one occasion. I agree with deevee in that they could have done something about the cover. The Barns and Noble that I got my copy at had it in the Science and Technology section and the only other section I have seen it in is History (I guess due to all the WW2 material in it). I am currently using my free time (the little bit I have as an Aerospace Engineering student) in two ways. First I am president and founder of the Alpha Phi Omega Service fraternity at The University of Alabama - Huntsville, where I go to school, whic does take some time, especially trying to get our Chapter recognition with the National Office. Secondly, I am currently researching The Hunt for Zero Point (that is how I found this site to begin with).

From what I can see, and what I know of physics, aerodynamics, ect, there is quite a bit of credibility in the science, in addition to the credibility Nick Cook has already. When I find out more "concrete" information I'll let you know.



posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 05:01 PM
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SwitchbladeNGC: be sure to U2U me with anything you turn up. I've got a heavy mathematical and "ok" physics background and have been looking into it a bit on my own; Mr. Cook's in-industry reputation apparently checks out and although he appears as close to scientifically illiterate as I can imagine it's possible to get away with as an aerospace reporter he doesn't throw out any blatantly wrong science, either....if nothing else it's the first time I've seen Schauberger's work covered that left me thinking maybe he wasn't a crank...

So if you find anything interesting I'll appreciate a heads-up...time permitting + a few other members together this might be the start of a good research forum project.



posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 05:01 PM
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I am reading The Hunt for Zero Point now, and its really good. I am only about 1/2 way and find it very very interesting.

As others have said I think its very intersting that the author is a highly respected defense industry reporter.


I want to know more about Eugene Podkletnov's expierements with super conductors and antigravity. Does anyone have any good links or anything?

I like how Nick Cook makes the case for the B2 using antigravity technology in the sense that the wings edges are charged which helps create lift, improve aerodynamic effciency, and greatly reduces the RCS. I have heard rumors of this, but never gave it anymore thought until I starting reading this book. Does anybody have anymore info on the B2 and how it supposedly uses electrogravitics?

I also like the part where they talk about the idea vault. The place where the lock up ideas that the govt feels are too dangerous for to try, and they almost put the idea stealth in the vault the book said. I wonder what else is in the old vault?



My real question is how could someone write a book about something so secret, and not be stopped, take out etc.. by the people that will supposedly stop at nothing to guard the secrets. Do the potectors want some info like this leaked to help their disinformation campaign?



[edit on 14-3-2005 by warpboost]



posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 05:21 PM
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Well, to answer the question of why it is out, as my Sig states, "disinformation works best when mixed in with a little truth", maybe they want to discredit him like they did to T. T. Brown. If they can allow certain elements of truth in but get out enough lies as well they can keep their secrets hidden, and discredit those that know the truth at the same time.



posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by warpboost


I like how Nick Cook makes the case for the B2 using antigravity technology in the sense that the wings edges are charged which helps create lift, improve aerodynamic effciency, and greatly reduces the RCS. I have heard rumors of this, but never gave it anymore thought until I starting reading this book. Does anybody have anymore info on the B2 and how it supposedly uses electrogravitics?



Hey mate, go have a browse of the Research Section, we did an investigation into it. Actually, I can't remember if I was on it or not, but there's lot of good info.



posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 11:03 PM
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I found an internet copy of "Electrogravitic Systems" which Nick Cook Mentions in his book. Thought it might be something you would be interested in.



posted on Mar, 14 2005 @ 11:49 PM
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Originally posted by SwitchbladeNGC
I found an internet copy of "Electrogravitic Systems" which Nick Cook Mentions in his book. Thought it might be something you would be interested in.


Brilliant find mate


I'll have a look through it, although I must confess, I am not the most technically proficient in science

[edit on 14-3-2005 by American Mad Man]



posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 02:14 PM
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Found some articles on Torsion Fields. Another good article on the subject is this one. Both talk about the reaction that spinning objects have on time. The second one states:

this new theory views elementary particles as a region of space-time so intensely warped that it bends back upon itself like a knot. Such a knot necessarily contains a "closed time-like curve". This time-loop, which is also one of the puzzling features of general relativity, enables a particle to interact with other particles not only in its past but in its future. Consequently, a new way of looking at entanglement is that sub-atomic particles, by virtue of the time machines they contain, are not constrained by time. There is nothing to prevent instantaneous interactions between particles, no matter the distance between them.

Just some information I thought might be useful for someone out there.



posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by SwitchbladeNGC
I found an internet copy of "Electrogravitic Systems" which Nick Cook Mentions in his book. Thought it might be something you would be interested in.



Nice find. Thanks



posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 03:35 PM
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Found an article by Eugene Podkletnov at Superconductors.org about an Impulse Gravity Generator. And it is Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory. I find it highly intregueing.



posted on May, 29 2005 @ 01:58 AM
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Originally posted by sisonek
I've tried searching ATS but have yet to find any threads that discuss this book in any depth; if there's been a good "let's pick this apart" thread I haven't seen it. Has anyone gone ahead and done some verification of names / dates / etc. from this book to make sure that it at least superficially checks out? It might make a good ATS research project if no one has yet.

The book is here at amazon.com:

The Hunt For Zero Point

and here's another site on the same book:

www.americanantigravity.com...

The executive summary of the book's claims:

* around 1955 or so there was a brief media excitement over the prospects of antigravity technology
* almost immediately excitement disappeared entirely, a pattern consistent with projects "going black"
* some of the technology the nazis had been working on had been antigravity related (and also, perhaps, zero-point related, though they may not have known that at the time)
* whatever antigrav work is done is kept entirely under wraps in a deadly serious fashion -- apprently the national security apparatus wasn't pleased with how quickly the atomic bomb spread to russia and others
* podletnkov's father had a collection of schauberger's papers
* antigrav is something "easy" to make if you know what you're doing, but not something you're likely to stumble across by accident if you don't know what to do
* apparently zero-point + gravity go hand in hand -- solve one and you solve the other, more or less

What's really interesting is how many names get named -- companies long since bought and incorporated into larger firms, some of the researchers involved, etc., which leaves this book's claims potentially more verifiable than pretty much anything else I've read. So again: has anyone already made a real attempt to go through and verify the claims in this book in any detailed fashion?


Do an ATS project on this? How arrogant! You don't think people have worked on this for 20 years? Nick Cook is a johnny-come-lately. Try Igor Witkowski and the Eastern European research groups he is affiliated with for instance or the Germans investigating "Jonastal" if that means anything to you or Maruizo Verga in Italy who has contacts with Luigi Romersa and Renato Vesco as well as a website devoted to this subject. Or the many, many books in German language on this subject by people who have given up their "real lives" for this. Or maybe the late (1997) Joseph Andreas Epp who was a consulting engineer on three of these projects who actually wrote a book on the subject "Die Realitaet der Flugscheiben" (The Reality of the Flying Discs). Get a copy of the Heinrich Fleissner (fluidics engineer at Peenemuende) patent for his flying saucer which was submitted in 1955 and granted in 1965---that will tell you how another German flying disc was constructed. The English speaking world and especially the Americans are simply the last to learn of these things.



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