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One Of The Biggest At-Home DNA Testing Companies Is Working With The FBI

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posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:30 PM
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I've always had a bad feeling about home DNA tests myself. Their policies about your privacy are usually vague or non-existent and the results have been found to be questionable.

I guess here's one more big reason not to trust them.

www.buzzfeednews.com...


Family Tree DNA, one of the largest private genetic testing companies whose home-testing kits enable people to trace their ancestry and locate relatives, is working with the FBI and allowing agents to search its vast genealogy database in an effort to solve violent crime cases, BuzzFeed News has learned.

Federal and local law enforcement have used public genealogy databases for more than two years to solve cold cases, including the landmark capture of the suspected Golden State Killer, but the cooperation with Family Tree DNA and the FBI marks the first time a private firm has agreed to voluntarily allow law enforcement access to its database.


While the FBI does not have the ability to freely browse genetic profiles in the library, the move is sure to raise privacy concerns about law enforcement gaining the ability to look for DNA matches, or more likely, relatives linked by uploaded user data.




posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:35 PM
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I'm sure a large number of us saw this coming. No warrant needed since the person gave it to some company who values money over your privacy.
edit on 2/1/2019 by roadgravel because: typo



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: dug88

I don't think anybody is surprised that this is where it has ended up. Thanks to smartphones, nearly every person's fingerprint will be stored along with their personal details. And now law enforcement have access to the DNA of millions of people without requiring a warrant to collect it.

And thanks to Google home and Alexa, etc, they have access to all audible conversations from those homes silly enough to have one.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:40 PM
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I'm shocked that anyone would be shocked about this.

Sadly, the bulk of the populace is a bit slow.

I'm sure they only charged money for the service because offering it for free may have just been too obvious.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: dug88

I don't leave evidence behind during my crimes, so I'm not too worried haha.

But I think soon the health insurance companies might start buying it and charging more if you have genetic tendencies towards certain diseases



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: Rewey

Ya, this is not surprising in the least.
I was offered a kit last year by my family..no thanks I said..they knew better anyway

I don't have a smartphone, do not have facebook acct, do not have Alexa, or smart tv.
All these cool things and conveniences have a potential for serious miss use by, marketers, the authorita's..etc



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: dug88

Funny, my sister bought one of these last March. I was supposed to buy one too. For some reason I never felt compelled. And my sister has never even opened the package in almost a year.

No way in hell im getting one now. Sometimes inactivity / intuition does work.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:01 PM
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This is so 20 years ago people keep up

I was just having a lol with my old mother the other day about her genetic test and our family history and the human genome , interesting afternoon

S&F op
edit on 1/2/2019 by stonerwilliam because: spelling



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:01 PM
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BUZZFEED again?

Maybe we need to sit back and think about other sources for a bit than Buzzfeed. CNN sounds more logical and they suck.

Thank you for Gizmodo.... cant be worse.


edit on 1-2-2019 by Justoneman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: dug88

Any company based in the US had to give up any of their data to the NSA anyway, and can even be forced to do so while arguing they didn't. Any citizen who refuses can legally be detained without notice, and essentially buried under Guantanamo bay.

Thanks, freedom.

Many of us have known for several decades...



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: Rewey
And thanks to Google home and Alexa, etc, they have access to all audible conversations from those homes silly enough to have one.


...and smartphones, and smart TVs, and Facebook, and frequent shopper club cards, and major credit and debit cards, and GPS systems, and home security systems...

We did it to ourselves and we're dumbasses for it.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker

What if in the near future, a person's employment prospects are determined by their DNA profile.

I think its all coming. Public DNA for everyone. Designer babies. All of it.

No one 25 years ago could have foreseen the loss of privacy that exists today. Not even the people that run Google and Facebook. They may have dreamed it but they could not have realized how successful they would be.

Hardly anyone believed the extent of government data collection before Snowden exposed it. Even though there were articles all over for at least 10 years before that detailing how NSA tapped the internet and collected everything. I can even recall seeing photos of the cables and exact locations of their installations. The were articles on the govt collecting all telephone data. No one wanted to believe it.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:16 PM
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I am a little part RED Indian
maybe that is why whisky triggers me so bad



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: toms54
No one 25 years ago could have foreseen the loss of privacy that exists today.


I disagree... Orwell foresaw it 70 years ago.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:20 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: toms54
No one 25 years ago could have foreseen the loss of privacy that exists today.


I disagree... Orwell foresaw it 70 years ago.


Animal farm ?



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: stonerwilliam

You joke, but Animal Farm is quickly approaching soothsayer levels considering how a cadre of wealthy Democrats are now calling for socialism and taxation of the wealthy at asinine levels (taxes which they and their benefactors will certainly avoid). Meanwhile, Nineteen Eighty Four looks like it was presumed to be the blueprint for the modern IC.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: Rewey
And thanks to Google home and Alexa, etc, they have access to all audible conversations from those homes silly enough to have one.


...and smartphones, and smart TVs, and Facebook, and frequent shopper club cards, and major credit and debit cards, and GPS systems, and home security systems...

We did it to ourselves and we're dumbasses for it.


I really do hope that they are listening when I tell my wife what I think about them.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:34 PM
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And yet----they caught the Golden State killer. Perhaps the relative who submitted his DNA feels his "rights were violated!" but maybe not. I just found an unknown brother using 23andme, or rather, he found me. He knew his father he grew up with was probably not his biological father, so he and his daughter both submitted their sample and what do you know? I came up a 25% match for him and 17% for his daughter. Seems my father was sowing his oats when I was in high school. And his Mom worked at the same restaurant my father did.

Now I suppose you could say our father's "rights were violated." After all, he did not consent to any sort of DNA test and provided no sample, but he got caught out anyway. If they'd caught him 50 years ago, he'd be liable for child support. And he should have been. Anyone who has been accused of child support falsely knows the value of a test that can prove innocence as easily as guilt. I think that is a good thing.

Remember that it doesn't really matter whether you personally have a DNA test done. My father died years before the tests were available. You may be able to avoid a test, but you can't control all your relatives, and sometimes that's all you need.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:37 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: toms54
No one 25 years ago could have foreseen the loss of privacy that exists today.


I disagree... Orwell foresaw it 70 years ago.


He may have but when I told people 20 years ago that phone calls could be searched by computers for key words or voice prints, they seriously thought I was crazy. Project Echelon was called a conspiracy theory.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 07:44 PM
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originally posted by: Justoneman
BUZZFEED again?

Maybe we need to sit back and think about other sources for a bit than Buzzfeed. CNN sounds more logical and they suck.

Thank you for Gizmodo.... cant be worse.



Well there's this discussion on the article i actually found better than the article itself. I'm just not sure if i can post such things as an op

news.ycombinator.com...


originally posted by: schuyler
And yet----they caught the Golden State killer. Perhaps the relative who submitted his DNA feels his "rights were violated!" but maybe not. I just found an unknown brother using 23andme, or rather, he found me. He knew his father he grew up with was probably not his biological father, so he and his daughter both submitted their sample and what do you know? I came up a 25% match for him and 17% for his daughter. Seems my father was sowing his oats when I was in high school. And his Mom worked at the same restaurant my father did.

Now I suppose you could say our father's "rights were violated." After all, he did not consent to any sort of DNA test and provided no sample, but he got caught out anyway. If they'd caught him 50 years ago, he'd be liable for child support. And he should have been. Anyone who has been accused of child support falsely knows the value of a test that can prove innocence as easily as guilt. I think that is a good thing.

Remember that it doesn't really matter whether you personally have a DNA test done. My father died years before the tests were available. You may be able to avoid a test, but you can't control all your relatives, and sometimes that's all you need.


www.nytimes.com...


In a new study, 74 out of 108 crime laboratories implicated an innocent person in a hypothetical bank robbery

edit on 1/2/2019 by dug88 because: (no reason given)



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