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Possible Houston Shooting Coverup

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posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 07:04 PM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: Grimpachi

That is really plausible the cops messed up and went to the wrong house, a no knock raid with plain clothes cops, first thing they do is shoot the dog I would say this being the case it's only reasonable to assume the home owner would exercise his second amendment rights as well as his right to protect his home and family and come out blasting, those cops were lucky he wasn't one of those jack reacher type characters from the movies.


I am usually 100% behind LEO in cases like this, but this one smells rotten. I think they screwed up, hit the wrong house. Barking pit bull doesnt make you a heroin dealer. While the other house looks sketchy as hell




posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 07:09 PM
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a reply to: putnam6

Sketchy as hell alright, friendly neighbors, 20 year marriage, owned the house, no drugs found or signs of dealing, I'm not buying the police version of events at all.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: putnam6

So you really aren't against these type of police raids for someone possessing a naturally occurring substance, even if the suspects become accidentally dead? Oooops, oh well.

You think it was just a honest accident? You have no concern of what is going on here beyond the police possibly looking bad. None of the multitude of other similar cases like this concerns you at all?

How long has this war on SOME drugs been going on? When will they start going after the truly dangerous drugs like alcohol?

Can you honestly say these types of police actions are for our safety?



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 07:30 PM
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I think the phrase he "came around from the rear of the house" just meant he was in a back room that circled around to the front. The whole story makes no sense if he somehow got out of the house with 14 cops surrounding it and came in the front and shot someone. It is just a misunderstanding on the description of things.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 09:13 PM
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originally posted by: ClovenSky
a reply to: putnam6

So you really aren't against these type of police raids for someone possessing a naturally occurring substance, even if the suspects become accidentally dead? Oooops, oh well.

You think it was just a honest accident? You have no concern of what is going on here beyond the police possibly looking bad. None of the multitude of other similar cases like this concerns you at all?

How long has this war on SOME drugs been going on? When will they start going after the truly dangerous drugs like alcohol?

Can you honestly say these types of police actions are for our safety?


Jump to conclusions much..... lets keep the discussion to this case, I know theres plenty ones out there that are questionable. POINT was I always give the benefit of doubt to LEO initially,doesnt mean I close my mind, this one is so over the top lets hope its investigated to it fullest. Get it on the front page,keep it there

BTW closer to wanting legalization of certain substances too, LOL but your generalization that black tar heroin is in the same class as reefer is exactly what scares conservatives and keeps them from getting MJ legalized. Small steps my man.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:46 AM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

I read about this at Reason, and this is the part that really got my dander up:

Joe Gamaldi, president of the Houston Police Officers Union, seized on the occasion to condemn people who criticize cops. "We are sick and tired of having targets on our back," he said on Monday night. "We are sick and tired of having dirtbags trying to take our lives when all we're trying to do is protect this community and protect our families. Enough is enough. And if you're the ones that are out there spreading the rhetoric that police officers are the enemy, well, just know we've all got your number now, and we're going to be keeping track of all y'all, and we're going to be making sure we're going to be holding you accountable every time you stir the pot on our police officers."

The Cops Were the Aggressors in This Week's Deadly Houston Drug Raid

Two civilians are dead, officers have been shot (and quite likely at least some of those bullets were from "friendly" fire), and the head of the union is making threats against the people... the people who have every right and responsibility to demand accountability on the part of those hired to protect the community.

The rot starts at the top. And Gamaldi is proving it. People are tired of having a target on their backs too. People are tired of police killing our fellow citizens. And people are tired of being blamed for the piss poor performance of our law enforcement.

I won't blame the officers just following orders and trying to do their job to the best of their ability. I blame their superiors. I blame the ones who refuse to give adequate and appropriate training. I blame the ones who cover for the bad cops. I blame the ones who condone retaliation against whistleblowers.

And I am very very grateful for the good cops that still go to work every day under the most difficult conditions because they know that if they don't hit the streets, then there will only be bad cops on the streets.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 08:59 AM
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I'm not saying that this wasn't a drug house or that the suspects were innocent. And I'm not second guessing the officers or intimating that they did anything wrong. However, the police administration's reaction and rushed narrative is disconcerting.

Within hours of the shooting, Chief Acevedo made an emphatic comment to the media that "officers identified themselves as police several times" and that they "had the cars outside the residence sound their sirens to let the suspects know they were police". Sirens? On a no-knock drug search warrant?

Within 72 hours following the incident, police released a "slick" video animation detailing each officers' and subjects' specific location and movement in the house as well as when and where each shot was fired. Investigations like this takes weeks, not hours or days. The initial officers through the door were still under intensive medical care when the animation was released. I can't imagine they would have been interviewed at that point.

A description of evidence located at the scene wasn't released until much later. Apparently, they found "marijuana and a white powder that may be coc aine or fentanyl". (It turned out to be coc aine.) There was no black tar heroin, which is specifically what the warrant and raid were issued on. What are the odds that "heavy" drug dealers would run out of product? If the suspects heard the police (and sirens) and flushed the heroin, why wouldn't they ditch the other stuff as well? Or did police take so much time identifying themselves (and sounding sirens) that the suspects had time to get rid of some of the evidence?


Initial statements released by the administration stated that "officers purchased" heroin at the residence on several occasions. It's now been verified that a CI (confidential informant) made the buy(s).


The initial complaint (from a neighbor) that the investigation was based upon detailed "heavy traffic to and from the residence"? Neighbors (as always) were stunned and surprised. Some claim the couple weren't drug dealers. Several said they never noticed an "unusual amount of traffic". The now deceased suspects are described as a middle-aged disabled vet and his wife with no previous criminal history. (All this means nothing, but is added for context.)

Again, I'm not questioning the officers or their actions. My concern is the apparent overreaction from the administration. It almost sounds like a proactive defense. Rushed investigation findings, explanations, unusually overly detailed "facts" coupled with slow release of normal information and the chief's overemphasis on police identifying themselves is odd. It's been my experience that rushed, exceptionally detailed explanations usually indicate someone's sweeping poop under the carpet.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: StreetGlide

Points that should be considered.

I too am curious about the questions you ask.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: ClovenSky




If this was the wrong house or if nothing is found, all of the participating police officers should be prosecuted with 1st degree premeditated murder. 


I don't know enough about the circumstances to make a judgment on whether this happened because someone #ed up, but I don't think you know what first -degree or premeditated mean.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 10:02 AM
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With videos of cops planting drugs I question their findings of Coc and weed. They never said how much was found.


In the past where the cops were busted, they planted it then turned on their body cameras not realizing the camera records the previous 30 seconds. This case stinks to high heaven.

I can imagine a cop filling out a warrant based off a CI info and fabricating that he watched him enter that house. Probably screwing up the street name. If so I imagine the CI will disappear.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

If someone unexpectedly burst into my home and shot my dog, I would immediately respond in kind.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
With videos of cops planting drugs I question their findings of Coc and weed. They never said how much was found.


In the past where the cops were busted, they planted it then turned on their body cameras not realizing the camera records the previous 30 seconds. This case stinks to high heaven.

I can imagine a cop filling out a warrant based off a CI info and fabricating that he watched him enter that house. Probably screwing up the street name. If so I imagine the CI will disappear.


Once more, you're going off of YOUR own speculation. You say everything as if you first hand know that the cops are the ones at fault here, when in truth, you don't know anything more than any of us do. Until more information comes to light, we just can't know off of the information currently available. ONLY speculation. But as you have already shown, your speculation is biased. That's even of less worth than unbiased speculation just going off of the information we do know.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: RadioRobert

I don't really think it is all that difficult to understand either. Entering the premise with the intent to kill.

If they weren't looking for confrontation, why wouldn't the simply barricade the house and ask for surrender? Too many witnesses? Too long for press to show up and start asking difficult questions?

The exact method and execution of this raid tell us all we need to know about motives and intents. Why should they get a pass where in this same exact situation, people without a badge would get a 1st degree charge?

I am all for holding the superiors accountable as well, but at some point, the people need to start thinking for themselves and stop allowing the orders to override morals. They pulled the trigger. They are just as accountable as the superiors. It is the only way.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea



The rot starts at the top. And Gamaldi is proving it. People are tired of having a target on their backs too. People are tired of police killing our fellow citizens. And people are tired of being blamed for the piss poor performance of our law enforcement. I won't blame the officers just following orders and trying to do their job to the best of their ability. I blame their superiors. I blame the ones who refuse to give adequate and appropriate training. I blame the ones who cover for the bad cops. I blame the ones who condone retaliation against whistleblowers.


Agreed. I lived in H-Town for 20 years and HPD has long been a problem.

I knew the wife........we (my friends and I ) knew her as "Nicky Tuttle". She was a great person, great sense of humor and she led a pretty difficult life.
Life is cheap on the East Side. Very sad.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: TonyS


I knew the wife........we (my friends and I ) knew her as "Nicky Tuttle". She was a great person, great sense of humor and she led a pretty difficult life. Life is cheap on the East Side. Very sad.


< < Cyber hugs > > for your loss. I'm so sorry this is personal for you.

But that's the thing I always remember when one of these cases hits the news... whether it's a civilian or an officer that's shot... that it's always personal for someone... someone is grieving and nursing a broken heart.
edit on 1-2-2019 by Boadicea because: formatting



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky




I don't really think it is all that difficult to understand either. Entering the premise with the intent to kill. 


(Assuming they #ed up and hit the wrong house) if you want to watch these guys walk but want your name in the papers, go ahead and charge them with that. Good luck showing their frame of mind was to plan an attack and go in and kill people.





If they weren't looking for confrontation, why wouldn't the simply barricade the house and ask for surrender? 


Because bad guys typically take that warning to grab a weapon and fight instead of surrendering? "I'm not going back to prison, pig!" * bang, bang, bang* Also gives the smart ones plenty of time to destroy evidence while the police are twiddling their thumbs outside.

A properly executed house raid is way safer to everyone involved (and the neighborhood in general) than knocking on the door and barricading them in and waiting out a seige.


And again, it's entirely possible they screwed up somehow. But that whole line of thought of charging them with 1st degree murder is divorced from reality.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Thanks,
It has been something of a shock; didn't realize who the victim was until I saw her photo on the Youtube report.

It's taken me back to a rather dark and troubling time in my life. Sad to say but East Houston is, (or was) home to many people like Nicky. They tried (try) every day to get by, ever falling short, but smiling through it all. Good people caught up in a bad place and in bad times.

Hopefully at least now, she's resting in peace.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 02:01 PM
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originally posted by: StallionDuck
a reply to: Grimpachi

- "Best friend" said they didn't deal drugs out of that house... Said it twice in a row and looked down right when he said it the second time. That tells me it's a lie or it wasn't the 'whole' truth. They may have been dealing pot out of the house but his statement was not fully truthful.



Except, they weren't executing a search warrant on weed dealers. They where specifically executing a search warrant of a property, which they claimed they had first hand evidence smack was being sold from.

If that was the case, then they'd have solid evidence to prove it, even if you were to entertain the idea that the couple might of been dry at the time... Like, scales with her oin residue, baggies and a large amount of small denomination bills

I highly doubt you'll ever here about the cops finding anything like that on the property though... I personally suspect this was a surprisingly common case of wrong address... and the couple were simply exercising there 2nd amendment right, by defending themselves from what was essentially a home invasion.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: CosmicAwakening

Thanks. The whole story stinks. If it is a bad raid and a coverup like it looks to be then the video below sounds ominous to those who dare to question the narrative.





Who is that dweeb?

God he sounds like a dunce...



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: StallionDuck
I feel that in this case, if there was nothing going on, none of those officers would have been shot. They would have been face down and in fear. No running away and shooting back.

Add a pit bull to the mix... That's kinda like paraphernalia for drug dealers lol

Just my thoughts.


Yet we hear time and time again, if you break into my house I will shoot you, no questions asked.

And these guys were plain clothed, and shot their dog.

On the floor? Sorry John McClaine....




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