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What preparations are being made for a no-deal Brexit ?

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posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 02:00 PM
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I doubt that parliament will accept 'no deal'. They will kick the can down the road by way of extension, which might in turn trigger an election. If labour win in that scenario then another referendum will be on the cards.




posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: DoctorBluechip

If , you're a remainer still , it's because you're ignorant about it . That , or you're in the employ of the partisans .



One of the biggest factors in voting to remain in the EU, after the EU actually being good for my part of the UK was the mess it was going to create, nobody knew how it was going to be implimented and we were going to be in chaos. I was eight, why would that make me a remainer?

I'm for Brexit in that it's how the country voted and I'll protest in the streets if we don't leave. But I'll feel dirty doing so because I don't think we should be leaving but I believe in democracy.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: midicon
I doubt that parliament will accept 'no deal'. They will kick the can down the road by way of extension, which might in turn trigger an election. If labour win in that scenario then another referendum will be on the cards.


Which is precisely my point. Labour is not politicking around Brexit per se, they are after driving the country into an early general election and the ensuing turmoil. It's incidental that a change of government will lead to Brexit thing being stopped. Corbyn - being the democrat that he is - is refusing a free vote on Brexit. Where MPs defy him they may be ousted by his mates in Momentum, who will target and deselect dissenters. Stalin would be proud.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: Moohide
I voted to leave, and i just wish they would get on with the job they are paid very well to do, LEAVE the European Union.


That proves you don't know what they are paid to do. I bet if you Google "What is the role of a member of Parliament?" Brexit isn't one of their roles. I bet it's not even in the job description.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi
Well, I have started to stockpile pints at my local. I intend to have sixty pints lined up for 1st April celebrations/mourning.

I think the EU are clearly banking on the UK giving in, which is a real possibility with Labour running the country towards Brexit failure.


You do know Theresa May and her cronies are Tories, right?



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 02:28 PM
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I am stocking up on fireworks, beer, and popcorn. 10 years from now you peeps will be celebrating by burning an effigy of jean claunde funkner on a large pile of wood.

Germany would collapse into ruin if the UK would stop its unhealthy obsession with german cars.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: djz3ro



That proves you don't know what they are paid to do. I bet if you Google "What is the role of a member of Parliament?" Brexit isn't one of their roles. I bet it's not even in the job description.


Ok, so i googled it, you obviously didnt, so at the top of google it says



MPs split their time between working in Parliament itself, working in the constituency that elected them and working for their political party. Some MPs from the governing party (or parties) become government ministers with specific responsibilities in certain areas, such as Health or Defence.


So who do you think should be in charge of leaving then?



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: DoctorBluechip

Move along
Nothing to worry about
Everything will be hunky dory !



Brexit threat to school dinners comes as stockpiling intensifies
Schools should be “flexible” in what dinners they serve children in England if there are food shortages because of Brexit, the government has said as it warns local authorities to step up their no-deal planning.

Stockpiling across the country is intensifying as the clock ticks down to 29 March, with the private sector revealing plans to secure long-term supplies of everything from emergency trauma packs to soap and Magnum ice-cream.



No-deal Brexit 'to leave shelves empty' warn retailers

A no-deal Brexit threatens the UK's food security and will lead to higher prices and empty shelves in the short-term, retailers are warning.

Sainsbury's, Asda and McDonald's are among those warning stockpiling fresh food is impossible and that the UK is very reliant on the EU for produce.

The warning comes in a letter from the British Retail Consortium and is signed by several of the major food retailers.
It comes ahead of crucial votes in Parliament on Tuesday.

Retailers have told me that they fear shelves would be left empty if there were significant disruptions to supplies.
The letter from the retailers, and seen by the BBC, says there will be "significant risks" to maintaining the choice, quality and shelf life of food.

"We are extremely concerned that our customers will be among the first to experience the realities of a no deal Brexit," the letter says



'Trauma packs' being stockpiled in UK over fears of no-deal Brexit

Emergency “trauma packs” flown into the UK during terrorist attacks are being stockpiled in Britain by the pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson over concerns of a risk to life from border delays in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The company said the move was being made due to the danger posed to the “routine and rapid” provision of the vital emergency equipment it provides to the NHS in times of emergency from a distribution plant in Belgium.

Hospitals do not generally keep large stocks of such emergency packs due to the risk of the devices or medicines contained within them running past their product shelf life.

The development highlights the dependence of the UK on frictionless movement of goods across the border. On Thursday, the head of NHS England, Simon Stevens, admitted to the dangers posed by Brexit



Jobs fears haunt the frantic scramble for a Brexit deal
Executives at Haribo, a German confectionery company which has its UK headquarters in Pontefract and employs 700 people across the constituency, have also written to Cooper.
“As a food company, we can’t keep endless stocks, so we rely on timing for delivery, so customs checks would have a significant impact on how we operate,” said Herwig Vennekens, Haribo’s managing director for marketing and sales.

“We have other European factories, so that increases in price would negatively affect the UK’s competition with those other European factories. It depends on the levels of tariff and checks.”


Whilst sensible people are busy planning out for the direst of consequences
Auntie Teresa jets off on another wild goose chase to Europe
-> hint : the EU has given her the best deal available


It's up to you to sort out Brexit impasse, Donald Tusk tells Theresa May

Theresa May has been told by Donald Tusk that it is her job to find a solution to the Brexit impasse during what sources have described as an “open and frank” 45-minute phone call in the wake of her demands for a renegotiation.

The European council president warned the prime minister that a precondition for any further talks was a concrete plan from Downing Street that could clearly command the support of parliament.

She in turn insisted to the EU’s most senior official that parliament had highlighted the issue that needed to be addressed in its vote on the so-called Brady amendment on Tuesday evening. But the EU source said May then subsequently failed to offer any proposals during the conversation.

Tusk is understood to have replied that the prime minister could not expect Brussels to come to her rescue with a solution. EU officials and leaders are increasingly concerned that Downing Street is seeking to blame Brussels for their failures.


Since i can't see any unicorns coming alongto bail you all out
i'd (in)sincerly suggest that the Brits would be best helped
by transforming their pretty rose gardens with hedgrerows
into allotments for growing those future hard-to-find products...

Onions, Tomatoes, lettuces ... to name just a few

You never had it so good
before March the 29th



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: Moohide

'So who do you think should be in charge of leaving then?'

Rees Mogg



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 03:20 PM
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originally posted by: Moohide
a reply to: djz3ro



That proves you don't know what they are paid to do. I bet if you Google "What is the role of a member of Parliament?" Brexit isn't one of their roles. I bet it's not even in the job description.


Ok, so i googled it, you obviously didnt, so at the top of google it says



MPs split their time between working in Parliament itself, working in the constituency that elected them and working for their political party. Some MPs from the governing party (or parties) become government ministers with specific responsibilities in certain areas, such as Health or Defence.


So who do you think should be in charge of leaving then?


You said that they should do what they're being paid to do and leave the EU. They aren't actually paid for that, it just happens to be what their job requires them to do at the moment.. I was being pedantic, I don't recommend it, its not big, its not clever and it goes over some people's heads....



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 03:22 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi

originally posted by: midicon
I doubt that parliament will accept 'no deal'. They will kick the can down the road by way of extension, which might in turn trigger an election. If labour win in that scenario then another referendum will be on the cards.


Which is precisely my point. Labour is not politicking around Brexit per se, they are after driving the country into an early general election and the ensuing turmoil. It's incidental that a change of government will lead to Brexit thing being stopped. Corbyn - being the democrat that he is - is refusing a free vote on Brexit. Where MPs defy him they may be ousted by his mates in Momentum, who will target and deselect dissenters. Stalin would be proud.


Now I get what you mean. I don't think Labour are popular enough yet to be able to pull off a general election, we'll end up with a coalition again...



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: Cassi3l

Great post - thanks

Unicorns do (nt) exist of course , but

There are brexit allies , namely the current governments of the US , Canada , New Zealand and Australia . Tusk is no fan of Trump , but good old Trumpster is very pro - Brexit .

It takes about a week to get a container vessel from NY to Southampton .

TM can take us into a no deal Brexit on her own , probably could have signed off the deal on her own too , but dangled it in for the pirhannas in parliament . Didn't want it anyway . Sorry Tusk : we saw him nearly crying when the letter was delivered
boo hoo



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: Cassi3l

Would you rather we pander to fear mongers ?

Our economy has been doing well since the referendum regardless of what was warned by the same Euro supporting Doom mongers.




You never had it so good
before March the 29th

Or we're getting out while the goings good.

Italy in recession amid sluggish eurozone
Italy has the biggest government debt in the EU at more than €2.3 trillion ($2.6tn; £2tn). It is also the fourth-largest government debt in the world.

The country's debt burden as a percentage of annual economic activity is second only to Greece in the EU at 132%.

Last week, European Central Bank (ECB) president Mario Draghi said eurozone economic data had been weaker than expected and the risks to growth had increased.

Claus Vistesen, chief eurozone economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said that the overall eurozone figures "don't look pretty, but have been well telegraphed by the hard data and the financial market horror show in Q4".
www.bbc.co.uk...


Time to put the "Great" back into Britain.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: DoctorBluechip

Cheers !
Here's the rub
conspiracy conspiracy

People (outside of Europe and the US) are rooting for failure
destabilising the healthy and complacant status quo
->we're all, right now, pretty much well off, with not too many worries, no ?

Trump and Brexit were dry runs
Italy, Poland .. "Macedonia' were easy pickings by comparason

Check this out : Active measures



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 09:05 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

it doesn't matter it's got to happen to late now



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:07 AM
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reply to: Cassi3l

Wow your buying g that fairy tale as well huh?? You know our own deep state already dismissed it?? The circus that continues is just to cover up our foreign policy initiaves. Better to have gullible morons fighting over a scripted play, than getting angry at the leaders for what's actually going on around the globe.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:39 AM
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Top headline this morning


One in three UK firms plan for no-deal Brexit relocation, IoD says

Nearly one in three British businesses are planning to relocate some of their operations abroad or have already shifted them to cope with a hard Brexit, according to a leading lobby group.

The Institute of Directors (IoD) warned that 29% of firms in a survey of 1,200 members believed Brexit posed a significant risk to their operations in the UK and had either moved part of their businesses abroad already or were planning to do so.
More than one in 10 had already set up operations outside the UK as the prospect of a no-deal Brexit becomes more likely amid Westminster gridlock.

Most firms considering a move were looking to open offices inside the European Union, said the IoD, which represents 30,000 firms.


Food shortages
Diminishing employment opportunities...

Brexit sans deal gets better and better by the day !

I could wittily suggest that if there's no bread, you should all just eat cake
But that'll be a bit difficult if there's no flour or butter coming in to the country

You can always go to the nearest chippy though
if spuds and fish aren't in short supply by the summer ...
Maybe that's when reality will start to bite

Brexiters are too far behind the curve
to see the calamity that's about to befall them



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 02:55 AM
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a reply to: Cassi3l

The IOD represents big business. You know, companies who may already have global operations and likely manufacture in China and elsewhere. In all the knee-jerkery and arse-flapping, what the commentators are not saying is that the EU is a bloc that inhibits trade, which is a good reason to be out of it. What's under-reported are those businesses who see the opportunities for creating trade outside of the EU's constraining shackles.

Besides, it seems Brexit is the coverall excuse for poor performance, the contraction in China and a host of other problems business people face everyday. Is Brexit causing the snow across the UK at the moment? Surely that's a "yes" if you a miserable twat who hates snow.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 04:17 AM
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originally posted by: Cassi3l
Top headline this morning


One in three UK firms plan for no-deal Brexit relocation, IoD says

Nearly one in three British businesses are planning to relocate some of their operations abroad or have already shifted them to cope with a hard Brexit, according to a leading lobby group.

The Institute of Directors (IoD) warned that 29% of firms in a survey of 1,200 members believed Brexit posed a significant risk to their operations in the UK and had either moved part of their businesses abroad already or were planning to do so.
More than one in 10 had already set up operations outside the UK as the prospect of a no-deal Brexit becomes more likely amid Westminster gridlock.

Most firms considering a move were looking to open offices inside the European Union, said the IoD, which represents 30,000 firms.


Food shortages
Diminishing employment opportunities...

Brexit sans deal gets better and better by the day !

I could wittily suggest that if there's no bread, you should all just eat cake
But that'll be a bit difficult if there's no flour or butter coming in to the country

You can always go to the nearest chippy though
if spuds and fish aren't in short supply by the summer ...
Maybe that's when reality will start to bite

Brexiters are too far behind the curve
to see the calamity that's about to befall them


I don't understand how they think. The UK Customs Checks are set to increase by a third on Brexit day, they haven't had the time, nor the budget to to train staff or prepare at all. This isn't something that will be sorted out in a matter of days, it will take months to get staff to a satisfactory level. Why on earth haven't the Tories been preparing this since their little civil war dragged us all down the road we're on (it's more of a dirt track, dangerously close to the edge of a cliff with sharp rocks and shark infested waters below)

But don't worry, everything's fine...

#MGBGA
#MakeGreatBritainGullibleAgain
edit on 1/2/19 by djz3ro because: Male Great Britain Gullible Again? Jeez, had to change that, didn't want to get into a gender row about Brotannia ha ha



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 04:19 AM
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the people voted for Brexit.
the government doesnt want Brexit.

If the government wanted Brexit, they'd give Europe the finger and tell them to put together a proposal for what they want in the post=brexit world.

Europe needs Britain, not the other way around!




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