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These Are The Most Promising SETI Radio Signals

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posted on Jan, 27 2019 @ 09:40 PM
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Hi!

Just in case someone is interested in SETI, I made a video about the most promising radio signals detected so far.

Here it is: www.youtube.com...

Hope you enjoy it!

What is the most promising SETI radio signal for you guys? Do you think we will discover an intelligent civilization with the SKA array?

Cheers,
Alberto.
edit on 27-1-2019 by alfa015 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 27 2019 @ 09:53 PM
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I LOVE PROMISING SETI SIGNAL VIDEOS! THANKS FOR POSTING!



posted on Jan, 27 2019 @ 10:17 PM
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Very interesting and good job on the video. Good ATS class content!
Interesting that the majority of signals are in the 1.2 -1.4 Ghz ranges.



posted on Jan, 27 2019 @ 11:21 PM
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originally posted by: charlyv
Interesting that the majority of signals are in the 1.2 -1.4 Ghz ranges.


That leads me to wonder if the original source was equal to Phi(1.61803398875) ghz and we can use that to track it back to its origin.



edit on 27-1-2019 by wtfatta because: Autocorrect fail



posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 12:25 AM
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It's unlikely that someone more advanced would use radio waves to communicate. Also even more unlikely to find civilization that does and it's at our level of tech.



posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 02:20 AM
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a reply to: alfa015

Nice, although I thought they sussed out what the "wow" signal was.

I don't have a favourite or even think that SETI will ever be successful but that's not really the point.
The act of looking is enough for me.



posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: KiwiNite

But in the early days of an advanced civilization most would discover radio and use that first. These signals can be travelling for thousands of years. As are the ones that we sent out. it maybe they have advanced much further than radio but we are just getting their radio signals now because of the distance.



posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 06:05 AM
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originally posted by: KiwiNite
It's unlikely that someone more advanced would use radio waves to communicate. Also even more unlikely to find civilization that does and it's at our level of tech.


Humans discovered fire about 400,000 years ago. We've advanced leaps and bounds since then, yet we still use fire.

But on the whole, I agree.



posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 07:59 AM
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originally posted by: KiwiNite
It's unlikely that someone more advanced would use radio waves to communicate. Also even more unlikely to find civilization that does and it's at our level of tech.


We use more wireless communications now than ever. From VLF (Very Low Frequencies) to EHF (Extremely High Frequencies) and the com companies are always wanting more.

If an alien culture was at our technical ability and developed like we did, they'd be buzzing with RF chatter.



posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: alfa015

Thank you for posting this.





posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: KiwiNite
It's unlikely that someone more advanced would use radio waves to communicate.


As most radiowaves are indistinguishable from cosmic background radiation after a few light years, I agree. It's not a feasible method for actual communication.

It is, however, a great method of testing the technological level of a society in another system.

We could pump out broadcasts at the PHI frequency so that, who ever picks up the frequency and has an understanding of some higher order math, can use the signal to calculate where and when the signal was emitted.

That a society could even receive those signals is an indication of the technological advancements in that society.



posted on Jan, 28 2019 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: wtfatta

As most radiowaves are indistinguishable from cosmic background radiation after a few light years


Nonsense. An Arecibo dish 10 MW signal would be detectable by a same sized receiver at a distance of 1000 light years. That would cover about 50000 stars in our neighborhood.

The issue is more about having any meaningful communication over such distances at all, when it takes 2000 years to get an answer.


If all you want is to be noticed, you could create artificial transits, blocking sunlight with a #ton of foil or something.
edit on 28-1-2019 by moebius because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2019 @ 07:44 AM
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Moebius makes a good point. Because RF travels at the speed of light, then it would take far too long to use it as two way communication at such great distances, however, it is great for our local communications.

I guess that the question becomes what can we consider a communication?

If we pick up on any intelligent activity in deep space, can that be considered a signal? Even if some sort of ancient signal is ages old, can that be a beacon? Is this like sending out a call sign on a Ham radio to announce your presence on the frequency when no one else is transmitting?

A true communication would have the intention of sending information meant to be intercepted by a specific party. If it wasn't mean for us and we heard it, we would be simply be eavesdropping. Although that would be a one way exchange of information, it would be a form of communication none the less.



posted on Jan, 29 2019 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: wtfatta

65 years ago the dish in Arecibo was being used to listen to Russian port activity bouncing off the ionosphere.



posted on Jan, 30 2019 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

What else (earthly or otherwise) might be found within that range?



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: KiwiNite

What would they do instead? Use highly advanced technology that we don't have the technology to understand, receive or decode?

I imagine using as simple a method of communication as possible would increase the chances of someone recognising it as communication, and of someone being able to respond in kind.

If you went to a remote tribe in the middle of the Amazon who have never been exposed to the outside world before, you wouldn't introduce yourself via WhatsApp, would you.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: wtfatta

Nonsense. An Arecibo dish 10 MW signal would be detectable by a same sized receiver at a distance of 1000 light years. That would cover about 50000 stars in our neighborhood.



Actually what you state is nonsense. Have you ever done the math?

Your 10MW signal is reduced to 1.1 picowatt (0.0000000000011W) at a short 5 lightyears. That signal is after it gets the 72db gain of an Arecibo like antenna.

Radio telescopes attempt to receive weak signals like this by using extremely high gain preamplifiers that are super cooled. The cooling reduces the junction noise of the transistors in the amplifier. But, even with all that, a signal that weak might not be detectable using current technologies.

If we presume that ET can do better it becomes important to understand that this signal is FAR below the Cosmic background.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: KiwiNite
It's unlikely that someone more advanced would use radio waves to communicate. Also even more unlikely to find civilization that does and it's at our level of tech.


It doesn't matter if they are using radio for active communication.

If they EVER used radio, the waves are still coming.

Radio transmissions wouldn't disappear, just because they switched to quantum fiber optic communication or something.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: wtfatta

FRB 121102 blows out background radiation anytime we record it incoming.

There is an animated graphic, that radio burst has a large wake and completely eliminates cosmic microwave background that is near it.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 07:25 PM
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Two possibilities exist: either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying.



― Arthur C. Clarke




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